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Veterinary Microbiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28400145/vaccination-of-cattle-against-bovine-viral-diarrhea-virus
#1
Benjamin W Newcomer, Manuel F Chamorro, Paul H Walz
Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is responsible for significant losses to the cattle industry. Currently, modified-live viral (MLV) and inactivated viral vaccines are available against BVDV, often in combination with other viral and bacterial antigens. Inactivated and MLV vaccines provide cattle producers and veterinarians safe and efficacious options for herd immunization to limit disease associated with BVDV infection. Vaccination of young cattle against BVDV is motivated by prevention of clinical disease and limiting viral spread to susceptible animals...
April 6, 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28377131/bovine-herpesvirus-1-modified-live-virus-vaccines-for-cattle-reproduction-balancing-protection-with-undesired-effects
#2
Christopher C L Chase, Robert W Fulton, Donal O'Toole, Benjamin Gillette, Russell F Daly, George Perry, Travis Clement
Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) has long been associated with reproductive failure in cattle following infection of the ovary and/or fetus. Vaccination prior to breeding has been an effective approach to lessen the impact of BoHV-1 on reproduction. Prior studies in the 1980s and 1990s established the susceptibility of the ovary and particularly the corpus luteum (CL) to BoHV-1 infection. A series of studies at breeding time established that: (1) in naïve animals, the CL was the major target of BoHV-1 pathology; (2) CL lesions occurred within 4-9 days after estrus; (3) similar lesions was seen with BoHV-1 MLV vaccines; (4) ovarian lesions varied by the vaccine strain used; (5) progesterone decreased with or without CL lesions; and (6) following reactivation of BoHV-1 latent infection, ovaries could become reinfected in the face of BoHV-1 immunity...
March 23, 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28385270/host-genetics-of-response-to-porcine-reproductive-and-respiratory-syndrome-in-nursery-pigs
#3
REVIEW
Jack Dekkers, Raymond R R Rowland, Joan K Lunney, Graham Plastow
PRRS is the most costly disease in the US pig industry. While vaccination, biosecurity and eradication effort have had some success, the variability and infectiousness of PRRS virus strains have hampered the effectiveness of these measures. We propose the use of genetic selection of pigs as an additional and complementary effort. Several studies have shown that host response to PRRS infection has a sizeable genetic component and recent advances in genomics provide opportunities to capitalize on these genetic differences and improve our understanding of host response to PRRS...
March 22, 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28377132/a-review-of-potential-bluetongue-virus-vaccine-strategies
#4
Christie Mayo, Justin Lee, Jennifer Kopanke, N James MacLachlan
Bluetongue (BT) is an economically important, non-zoonotic arboviral disease of certain wild and domestic species of cloven-hooved ungulates. Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the causative agent and the occurrence of BTV infection is distinctly seasonal in temperate regions of the world, and dependent on the presence of vector biting midges (e.g. Culicoides sonorensis in much of North America). In recent years, severe outbreaks have occurred throughout Europe and BTV is endemic in most tropical and temperate regions of the world...
March 18, 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28341332/the-viral-innate-immune-antagonism-and-an-alternative-vaccine-design-for-prrs-virus
#5
REVIEW
Hanzhong Ke, Dongwan Yoo
Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) remains one of the most economically significant diseases in the swine industry worldwide. The current vaccines are less satisfactory to confer protections from heterologous infections and long-term persistence, and the need for better vaccines are urgent. The immunological hallmarks in PRRSV-infected pigs include the unusually poor production of type I interferons (IFNs-α/β) and the aberrant and delayed adaptive immune responses, indicating that PRRSV has the ability to suppress both innate and adaptive immune responses in the host...
March 18, 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28330692/preface
#6
EDITORIAL
Chang-Won Lee, Fernando A Osorio, Amelia R Woolums
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 6, 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318782/role-of-the-microbiome-in-swine-respiratory-disease
#7
REVIEW
Megan C Niederwerder
Microbiome is a term used to describe the community of microorganisms that live on the skin and mucosal surfaces of animals. The gastrointestinal microbiome is essential for proper nutrition and immunity. How the gastrointestinal microbiome impacts primary respiratory or systemic infections is an emerging area of study. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is caused by a systemic virus infection with primary lung pathology and continues to be the most costly disease of swine worldwide. Recent studies have demonstrated that improved outcome after experimental infection with PRRS virus and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is associated with increased fecal microbiome diversity and the presence of non-pathogenic Escherichia coli...
March 2, 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28292547/pathogenesis-and-control-of-the-chinese-highly-pathogenic-porcine-reproductive-and-respiratory-syndrome-virus
#8
REVIEW
Jun Han, Lei Zhou, Xinna Ge, Xin Guo, Hanchun Yang
Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has remained a major threat to the worldwide swine industry ever since its first discovery in the early 1990s. Under the selective pressures in the field, this positive-stranded RNA virus undergoes rapid genetic evolution that eventually leads to emergence in 2006 of the devastating Chinese highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV). The atypical nature of HP-PRRSV has caused colossal economic losses to the swine producers in China and the surrounding countries...
March 2, 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28292546/novel-insights-into-host-responses-and-reproductive-pathophysiology-of-porcine-reproductive-and-respiratory-syndrome-caused-by-prrsv-2
#9
REVIEW
John C S Harding, Andrea Ladinig, Predrag Novakovic, Susan E Detmer, Jamie M Wilkinson, Tianfu Yang, Joan K Lunney, Graham S Plastow
A large challenge experiment using North American porcine reproductive and respiratory virus (PRRSV-2) provided new insights into the pathophysiology of reproductive PRRS. Deep phenotyping of dams and fetuses identified maternal and fetal predictors of PRRS severity and resilience. PRRSV infection resulted in dramatic decreases in all leukocyte subsets by 2days post inoculation. Apoptosis in the interface region was positively related to endometrial vasculitis, viral load in endometrium and fetal thymus, and odds of meconium staining...
March 2, 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284415/sampling-guidelines-for-oral-fluid-based-surveys-of-group-housed-animals
#10
Marisa L Rotolo, Yaxuan Sun, Chong Wang, Luis Giménez-Lirola, David H Baum, Phillip C Gauger, Karen M Harmon, Marlin Hoogland, Rodger Main, Jeffrey J Zimmerman
Formulas and software for calculating sample size for surveys based on individual animal samples are readily available. However, sample size formulas are not available for oral fluids and other aggregate samples that are increasingly used in production settings. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop sampling guidelines for oral fluid-based porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) surveys in commercial swine farms. Oral fluid samples were collected in 9 weekly samplings from all pens in 3 barns on one production site beginning shortly after placement of weaned pigs...
February 17, 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28215617/genetic-engineering-alveolar-macrophages-for-host-resistance-to-prrsv
#11
REVIEW
Randall S Prather, Kristin M Whitworth, Susan K Schommer, Kevin D Wells
Standard strategies for control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) have not been effective, as vaccines have not reduced the prevalence of disease and many producers depopulate after an outbreak. Another method of control would be to prevent the virus from infecting the pig. The virus was thought to infect alveolar macrophages by interaction with a variety of cell surface molecules. One popular model had PRRSV first interacting with heparin sulfate followed by binding to sialoadhesin and then being internalized into an endosome...
February 10, 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28274496/next-generation-sequencing-as-a-tool-for-the-study-of-porcine-reproductive-and-respiratory-syndrome-virus-prrsv-macro-and-micro-molecular-epidemiology
#12
REVIEW
M Cortey, I Díaz, G E Martín-Valls, E Mateu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 9, 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28228336/evaluation-of-hydrophobic-chitosan-based-particulate-formulations-of-porcine-reproductive-and-respiratory-syndrome-virus-vaccine-candidate-t-cell-antigens
#13
Helen Mokhtar, Lucia Biffar, Satyanarayana Somavarapu, Jean-Pierre Frossard, Sarah McGowan, Miriam Pedrera, Rebecca Strong, Jane C Edwards, Margarita Garcia-Durán, Maria Jose Rodriguez, Graham R Stewart, Falko Steinbach, Simon P Graham
PRRS control is hampered by the inadequacies of existing vaccines to combat the extreme diversity of circulating viruses. Since immune clearance of PRRSV infection may not be dependent on the development of neutralising antibodies and the identification of broadly-neutralising antibody epitopes have proven elusive, we hypothesised that conserved T cell antigens represent potential candidates for development of a novel PRRS vaccine. Previously we had identified the M and NSP5 proteins as well-conserved targets of polyfunctional CD8 and CD4 T cells...
February 3, 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284629/fermented-rapeseed-meal-is-effective-in-controlling-salmonella-enterica-serovar-typhimurium-infection-and-improving-growth-performance-in-broiler-chicks
#14
Amin Ashayerizadeh, Behrouz Dastar, Mahmoud Shams Shargh, Alireza Sadeghi Mahoonak, Saeed Zerehdaran
The aim of present experiment was to assess the effects of fermented rapeseed meal (FRSM) on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) colonization and growth performance in broiler chicks. Two hundred forty day-old male Cobb 500 broiler chicks were divided into six experimental treatments with four replicates and 10 birds per each. The treatments were including two positive and negative controls which birds received a basal corn-soybean diet as well as four others which birds received the diets that rapeseed meal (RSM) or FRSM was replaced with soybean meal at 50 and 100% levels...
March 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284628/japanese-encephalitis-virus-infection-diagnosis-and-control-in-domestic-animals
#15
REVIEW
Karen L Mansfield, Luis M Hernández-Triana, Ashley C Banyard, Anthony R Fooks, Nicholas Johnson
Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a significant cause of neurological disease in humans throughout Asia causing an estimated 70,000 human cases each year with approximately 10,000 fatalities. The virus contains a positive sense RNA genome within a host-derived membrane and is classified within the family Flaviviridae. Like many flaviviruses, it is transmitted by mosquitoes, particularly those of the genus Culex in a natural cycle involving birds and some livestock species. Spill-over into domestic animals results in a spectrum of disease ranging from asymptomatic infection in some species to acute neurological signs in others...
March 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284627/lumpy-skin-disease-outbreaks-in-greece-during-2015-16-implementation-of-emergency-immunization-and-genetic-differentiation-between-field-isolates-and-vaccine-virus-strains
#16
Eirini I Agianniotaki, Konstantia E Tasioudi, Serafeim C Chaintoutis, Peristera Iliadou, Olga Mangana-Vougiouka, Aikaterini Kirtzalidou, Thomas Alexandropoulos, Achilleas Sachpatzidis, Evangelia Plevraki, Chrysostomos I Dovas, Eleni Chondrokouki
The objective of this study is to present epizootiological data from the lumpy skin disease (LSD) outbreaks in Greece during 2015-16, following the implementation of emergency vaccination and total stamping-out, along with laboratory data regarding the genetic differentiation between field isolates and live attenuated vaccine virus strains. Descriptive geographical chronology analysis was conducted to present the progressive shift of the outbreaks westwards, and at the same time, the absence of further outbreaks in previously affected regional units where high vaccination coverage was achieved...
March 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284626/rabbit-hepatitis-e-virus-is-an-opportunistic-pathogen-in-specific-pathogen-free-rabbits-with-the-capability-of-cross-species-transmission
#17
Baoyuan Liu, Yani Sun, Taofeng Du, Yiyang Chen, Xinjie Wang, Baicheng Huang, Huixia Li, Yuchen Nan, Shuqi Xiao, Gaiping Zhang, Julian A Hiscox, En-Min Zhou, Qin Zhao
Hepatitis E virus (HEV) has been detected in rabbits, a recently identified natural reservoir. In this study, anti-HEV antibodies and viral RNA were detected in rabbits sourced from a specific-pathogen-free (SPF) rabbit vendor in Shaanxi Province, China. BLAST results of partial HEV ORF2 genes cloned here indicated that two viral strains circulated in the rabbits. Sequence determination of the complete genome (7302bp) of one strain and a partial ORF1 gene (1537bp) of the other strain showed that they shared 90% identity with one another and 78%-94% identity with other known rabbit HEVs...
March 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284625/putative-vaccine-breakthrough-event-associated-with-heterotypic-rotavirus-infection-in-newborn-calves-turkey-2015
#18
Ilke Karayel, Enikő Fehér, Szilvia Marton, Nüvit Coskun, Krisztián Bányai, Feray Alkan
Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are regarded as major enteric pathogens of large ruminants, including cattle. Rotavirus vaccines administered to pregnant cows are commonly used to provide passive immunity that protects newborn calves from the clinical disease. In this study we report the detection of RVA from calves with severe diarrhea in a herd regularly vaccinated to prevent enteric infections including RVA. Diarrheic disease was observed in newborn calves aged 4-15days, with high morbidity and mortality rates, but no diarrhea was seen in adult animals...
March 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284624/attenuation-of-an-original-us-porcine-epidemic-diarrhea-virus-strain-pc22a-via-serial-cell-culture-passage
#19
Chun-Ming Lin, Yixuan Hou, Douglas G Marthaler, Xiang Gao, Xinsheng Liu, Lanlan Zheng, Linda J Saif, Qiuhong Wang
Although porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) has caused huge economic losses in the pork industry worldwide, an effective live, attenuated vaccine is lacking. In this study, an original US, highly virulent PED virus (PEDV) strain PC22A was serially passaged in Vero CCL81 and Vero BI cells. The virus growth kinetics in cell culture, virulence in neonatal pigs and the whole genomic sequences of selected passages were examined. Increased virus titers and sizes of syncytia were observed at the 65th passage level (P65) and P120, respectively...
March 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284623/prevalence-and-molecular-epidemiology-of-canine-parvovirus-2-in-diarrheic-dogs-in-colombia-south-america-a-possible-new-cpv-2a-is-emerging
#20
Yeison Duque-García, Manuela Echeverri-Zuluaga, Juanita Trejos-Suarez, Julian Ruiz-Saenz
Since its identification in 1978, Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) has been considered a pathogen of great importance in the canine population because it causes severe enteritis with high mortality rates in pups. CPV-2 is a virus belonging to the family Parvoviridae. Currently, there are three described antigenic variants (CPV-2a, CPV-2b, and CPV-2c). CPV-2c is an emerging virus that is seen as a global health hazard. The objective of this work was to confirm the presence of CPV-2 in dogs with acute gastroenteritis compatible with parvovirus and to molecularly characterize the antigenic variants circulating in two regions of Colombia...
March 2017: Veterinary Microbiology
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