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Human Genetics

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28540413/a-recessive-mutation-in-beta-iv-spectrin-sptbn4-associates-with-congenital-myopathy-neuropathy-and-central-deafness
#1
Ellen Knierim, Esther Gill, Franziska Seifert, Susanne Morales-Gonzalez, Sathya D Unudurthi, Thomas J Hund, Werner Stenzel, Markus Schuelke
Congenital myopathies are a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders that are often genetically determined. Here, we investigated a boy with congenital myopathy, deafness, and neuropathy from a consanguineous Kurdish family by autozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing. We found a homozygous nonsense mutation in SPTBN4 [c.1597C>T, NM_020971.2; p.(Q533*), NP_066022.2; ClinVar SUB2292235] encoding βIV-spectrin, a non-erythrocytic member of the β-spectrin family. Western blot confirmed the absence of the full-length 288 kDa isoform in muscle and of a specific 72 kDa isoform in fibroblasts...
May 24, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28540412/a-distal-auxiliary-element-facilitates-cleavage-and-polyadenylation-of-dux4-mrna-in-the-pathogenic-haplotype-of-fshd
#2
Natoya Peart, Eric J Wagner
The degenerative muscle disorder facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is thought to be caused by the inappropriate expression of the Double Homeobox 4 (Dux4) protein in muscle cells leading to apoptosis. Expression of Dux4 in the major form of FSHD is a function of two contributing molecular changes: contractions in the D4Z4 microsatellite repeat region where Dux4 is located and an SNP present within a region downstream of the D4Z4. This SNP provides a functional, yet non-consensus polyadenylation signal (PAS) is used for the Dux4 mRNA 3' end processing...
May 24, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28528403/assessing-the-causal-relationship-between-obesity-and-venous-thromboembolism-through-a-mendelian-randomization-study
#3
Sara Lindström, Marine Germain, Marta Crous-Bou, Erin N Smith, Pierre-Emmanuel Morange, Astrid van Hylckama Vlieg, Hugoline G de Haan, Daniel Chasman, Paul Ridker, Jennifer Brody, Mariza de Andrade, John A Heit, Weihong Tang, Immaculata DeVivo, Francine Grodstein, Nicholas L Smith, David Tregouet, Christopher Kabrhel
Observational studies have shown an association between obesity and venous thromboembolism (VTE) but it is not known if observed associations are causal, due to reverse causation or confounding bias. We conducted a Mendelian Randomization study of body mass index (BMI) and VTE. We identified 95 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have been previously associated with BMI and assessed the association between genetically predicted high BMI and VTE leveraging data from a previously conducted GWAS within the INVENT consortium comprising a total of 7507 VTE cases and 52,632 controls of European ancestry...
May 20, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526948/an-innovative-strategy-to-clone-positive-modifier-genes-of-defects-caused-by-mtdna-mutations-mrps18c-as-suppressor-gene-of-m-3946g-a-mutation-in-mt-nd1-gene
#4
María Elena Rodríguez-García, Francisco Javier Cotrina-Vinagre, Patricia Carnicero-Rodríguez, Francisco Martínez-Azorín
We have developed a new functional complementation approach to clone modifier genes which overexpression is able to suppress the biochemical defects caused by mtDNA mutations (suppressor genes). This strategy consists in transferring human genes into respiratory chain-deficient fibroblasts, followed by a metabolic selection in a highly selective medium. We used a normalized expression cDNA library in an episomal vector (pREP4) to transfect the fibroblasts, and a medium with glutamine and devoid of any carbohydrate source to select metabolically...
May 19, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508290/crispr-cas9-mediated-somatic-and-germline-gene-correction-to-restore-hemostasis-in-hemophilia-b-mice
#5
Cong Huai, Chenqiang Jia, Ruilin Sun, Peipei Xu, Taishan Min, Qihan Wang, Chengde Zheng, Hongyan Chen, Daru Lu
Hemophilia B (HB) is an X-linked disorder caused by defects of F9 encoded coagulation factor IX, which is an ideal model for gene therapy. Most existing HB gene therapies are based on viral mediated gene supplementation, which could increase immunoreaction. In this study, CRISPR/Cas9 system was used for gene correction in an F9 mutant HB mouse model in both adult mice (in vivo) and in germline cells (ex vivo). In vivo, naked Cas9-sgRNA plasmid and donor DNA were delivered to HB mice livers to recover the mutation via hydrodynamic tail vein (HTV) injection...
May 15, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508289/somatic-mosaicism-with-reversion-to-normality-of-a-mutated-transthyretin-allele-related-to-a-familial-amyloidotic-polyneuropathy
#6
Concetta Federico, Ketty Dugo, Francesca Bruno, Anna Maria Longo, Agata Grillo, Salvatore Saccone
Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) is a progressive neuropathy, with onset in adulthood and high mortality. It is related to an altered transthyretin (TTR) plasma protein, mainly produced by the liver and responsible for amyloid deposit in the peripheral nervous system. SNPs in the TTR gene were associated with FAP, and the G>C substitution (NM_000371.3:c.325G>C) in the 109th codon (GAG vs CAG; NP_362.1:p.E109Q) was previously described in Sicily (Italy). Here, we report on a Sicilian family with several patients affected by FAP related to the E109Q mutation, which displayed a somatic mosaicism with the reversion to normality of the c...
May 15, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28500464/global-skin-colour-prediction-from-dna
#7
Susan Walsh, Lakshmi Chaitanya, Krystal Breslin, Charanya Muralidharan, Agnieszka Bronikowska, Ewelina Pospiech, Julia Koller, Leda Kovatsi, Andreas Wollstein, Wojciech Branicki, Fan Liu, Manfred Kayser
Human skin colour is highly heritable and externally visible with relevance in medical, forensic, and anthropological genetics. Although eye and hair colour can already be predicted with high accuracies from small sets of carefully selected DNA markers, knowledge about the genetic predictability of skin colour is limited. Here, we investigate the skin colour predictive value of 77 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 37 genetic loci previously associated with human pigmentation using 2025 individuals from 31 global populations...
May 12, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28497172/deep-intronic-mutations-and-human-disease
#8
REVIEW
Rita Vaz-Drago, Noélia Custódio, Maria Carmo-Fonseca
Next-generation sequencing has revolutionized clinical diagnostic testing. Yet, for a substantial proportion of patients, sequence information restricted to exons and exon-intron boundaries fails to identify the genetic cause of the disease. Here we review evidence from mRNA analysis and entire genomic sequencing indicating that pathogenic mutations can occur deep within the introns of over 75 disease-associated genes. Deleterious DNA variants located more than 100 base pairs away from exon-intron junctions most commonly lead to pseudo-exon inclusion due to activation of non-canonical splice sites or changes in splicing regulatory elements...
May 12, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28484853/protein-sequestration-as-a-normal-function-of-long-noncoding-rnas-and-a-pathogenic-mechanism-of-rnas-containing-nucleotide-repeat-expansions
#9
REVIEW
Ginny R Morriss, Thomas A Cooper
An emerging class of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) function as decoy molecules that bind and sequester proteins thereby inhibiting their normal functions. Titration of proteins by lncRNAs has wide-ranging effects affecting nearly all steps in gene expression. While decoy lncRNAs play a role in normal physiology, RNAs expressed from alleles containing nucleotide repeat expansions can be pathogenic due to protein sequestration resulting in disruption of normal functions. This review focuses on commonalities between decoy lncRNAs that regulate gene expression by competitive inhibition of protein function through sequestration and specific examples of nucleotide repeat expansion disorders mediated by toxic RNA that sequesters RNA-binding proteins and impedes their normal functions...
May 8, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28444561/a-rare-variant-in-the-fhl1-gene-associated-with-x-linked-recessive-hypoparathyroidism
#10
Nir Pillar, Oren Pleniceanu, Mingyan Fang, Limor Ziv, Einat Lahav, Shay Botchan, Le Cheng, Benjamin Dekel, Noam Shomron
Isolated familial hypoparathyroidism is an extremely rare disorder, which to date has been linked to several loci including mutations in CASR, GCM2, and PTH, as well as a rare condition defined as X-linked recessive hypoparathyroidism, previously associated with a 1.5 Mb region on Xq26-q27. Here, we report a patient with hypocalcemia-induced seizures leading to the diagnosis of primary hypoparathyroidism. Mutations in CASR, GCM2, and PTH were ruled out, while whole exome sequencing of the family suggested FHL1, located on chromosome Xq26, as the most likely causative gene variant (FHL1, exon 4, c...
April 25, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434044/faulty-rna-splicing-consequences-and-therapeutic-opportunities-in-brain-and-muscle-disorders
#11
REVIEW
Vittoria Pagliarini, Piergiorgio La Rosa, Claudio Sette
Alternative splicing is a powerful mechanism that largely expands the coding potential of eukaryotic genomes. Indeed, its complex and flexible regulation is exploited by cells to adapt to various environmental conditions, through production of protein variants displaying different functions. Such flexibility, however, is accompanied by high risk of errors, and dysregulation of splicing is now recognized as an important factor in human diseases. Notably, the RNA-based nature of splicing, which involves high specificity through base pair recognition, offers a remarkable therapeutic opportunity by allowing design of tools with elevated target selectivity...
April 22, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429085/the-role-of-rna-alternative-splicing-in-regulating-cancer-metabolism
#12
REVIEW
Itamar Kozlovski, Zahava Siegfried, Adi Amar-Schwartz, Rotem Karni
Tumor cells alter their metabolism by a wide array of mechanisms to promote growth and proliferation. Dysregulated expression and/or somatic mutations of key components of the glycolytic pathway/TCA cycle as well as other metabolic pathways allow tumor cells to improve their ability to survive harsh conditions such as hypoxia and the presence of reactive oxygen species, as well as the ability to obtain nutrients to increase lipids, protein, and nucleic acids biogenesis. Approximately 95% of the human protein encoding genes undergo alternative splicing (AS), a regulated process of gene expression that greatly diversifies the proteome by creating multiple proteins from a single gene...
April 20, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28405812/estimating-the-prevalence-of-functional-exonic-splice-regulatory-information
#13
REVIEW
Rosina Savisaar, Laurence D Hurst
In addition to coding information, human exons contain sequences necessary for correct splicing. These elements are known to be under purifying selection and their disruption can cause disease. However, the density of functional exonic splicing information remains profoundly uncertain. Several groups have experimentally investigated how mutations at different exonic positions affect splicing. They have found splice information to be distributed widely in exons, with one estimate putting the proportion of splicing-relevant nucleotides at >90%...
April 12, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28393272/heterozygous-hnrnpu-variants-cause-early-onset-epilepsy-and-severe-intellectual-disability
#14
Nuria C Bramswig, Hermann-Josef Lüdecke, Fadi F Hamdan, Janine Altmüller, Filippo Beleggia, Nursel H Elcioglu, Catharine Freyer, Erica H Gerkes, Yasemin Kendir Demirkol, Kelly G Knupp, Alma Kuechler, Yun Li, Daniel H Lowenstein, Jacques L Michaud, Kristen Park, Alexander P A Stegmann, Hermine E Veenstra-Knol, Thomas Wieland, Bernd Wollnik, Hartmut Engels, Tim M Strom, Tjitske Kleefstra, Dagmar Wieczorek
Pathogenic variants in genes encoding subunits of the spliceosome are the cause of several human diseases, such as neurodegenerative diseases. The RNA splicing process is facilitated by the spliceosome, a large RNA-protein complex consisting of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), and many other proteins, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). The HNRNPU gene (OMIM *602869) encodes the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U, which plays a crucial role in mammalian development. HNRNPU is expressed in the fetal brain and adult heart, kidney, liver, brain, and cerebellum...
April 9, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28393271/analysis-of-implantation-and-ongoing-pregnancy-rates-following-the-transfer-of-mosaic-diploid-aneuploid-blastocysts
#15
Elpida Fragouli, Samer Alfarawati, Katharina Spath, Dhruti Babariya, Nicoletta Tarozzi, Andrea Borini, Dagan Wells
Preimplantation genetic testing for aneuploidy (PGT-A) is widely used in IVF and aims to improve outcomes by avoiding aneuploid embryo transfers. Chromosomal mosaicism is extremely common in early development and could affect the efficacy of PGT-A by causing incorrect embryo classification. Recent innovations have allowed accurate mosaicism detection in trophectoderm samples taken from blastocysts. However, there is little data concerning the impact of mosaicism on viability, and the optimal clinical pathway for such embryos is unclear...
April 9, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28391526/trans-ethnic-fine-mapping-of-genetic-loci-for-body-mass-index-in-the-diverse-ancestral-populations-of-the-population-architecture-using-genomics-and-epidemiology-page-study-reveals-evidence-for-multiple-signals-at-established-loci
#16
Lindsay Fernández-Rhodes, Jian Gong, Jeffrey Haessler, Nora Franceschini, Mariaelisa Graff, Katherine K Nishimura, Yujie Wang, Heather M Highland, Sachiko Yoneyama, William S Bush, Robert Goodloe, Marylyn D Ritchie, Dana Crawford, Myron Gross, Myriam Fornage, Petra Buzkova, Ran Tao, Carmen Isasi, Larissa Avilés-Santa, Martha Daviglus, Rachel H Mackey, Denise Houston, C Charles Gu, Georg Ehret, Khanh-Dung H Nguyen, Cora E Lewis, Mark Leppert, Marguerite R Irvin, Unhee Lim, Christopher A Haiman, Loic Le Marchand, Fredrick Schumacher, Lynne Wilkens, Yingchang Lu, Erwin P Bottinger, Ruth J L Loos, Wayne H-H Sheu, Xiuqing Guo, Wen-Jane Lee, Yang Hai, Yi-Jen Hung, Devin Absher, I-Chien Wu, Kent D Taylor, I-Te Lee, Yeheng Liu, Tzung-Dau Wang, Thomas Quertermous, Jyh-Ming J Juang, Jerome I Rotter, Themistocles Assimes, Chao A Hsiung, Yii-Der Ida Chen, Ross Prentice, Lewis H Kuller, JoAnn E Manson, Charles Kooperberg, Paul Smokowski, Whitney R Robinson, Penny Gordon-Larsen, Rongling Li, Lucia Hindorff, Steven Buyske, Tara C Matise, Ulrike Peters, Kari E North
Most body mass index (BMI) genetic loci have been identified in studies of primarily European ancestries. The effect of these loci in other racial/ethnic groups is less clear. Thus, we aimed to characterize the generalizability of 170 established BMI variants, or their proxies, to diverse US populations and trans-ethnically fine-map 36 BMI loci using a sample of >102,000 adults of African, Hispanic/Latino, Asian, European and American Indian/Alaskan Native descent from the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology Study...
April 8, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28391525/regsnps-splicing-a-tool-for-prioritizing-synonymous-single-nucleotide-substitution
#17
Xinjun Zhang, Meng Li, Hai Lin, Xi Rao, Weixing Feng, Yuedong Yang, Matthew Mort, David N Cooper, Yue Wang, Yadong Wang, Clark Wells, Yaoqi Zhou, Yunlong Liu
While synonymous single-nucleotide variants (sSNVs) have largely been unstudied, since they do not alter protein sequence, mounting evidence suggests that they may affect RNA conformation, splicing, and the stability of nascent-mRNAs to promote various diseases. Accurately prioritizing deleterious sSNVs from a pool of neutral ones can significantly improve our ability of selecting functional genetic variants identified from various genome-sequencing projects, and, therefore, advance our understanding of disease etiology...
April 8, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28391524/intron-retention-as-a-component-of-regulated-gene-expression-programs
#18
REVIEW
Aishwarya G Jacob, Christopher W J Smith
Intron retention has long been an exemplar of regulated splicing with case studies of individual events serving as models that provided key mechanistic insights into the process of splicing control. In organisms such as plants and budding yeast, intron retention is well understood as a major mechanism of gene expression regulation. In contrast, in mammalian systems, the extent and functional significance of intron retention have, until recently, remained greatly underappreciated. Technical challenges to the global detection and quantitation of transcripts with retained introns have often led to intron retention being overlooked or dismissed as "noise"...
April 8, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28386624/mutated-pet117-causes-complex-iv-deficiency-and-is-associated-with-neurodevelopmental-regression-and-medulla-oblongata-lesions
#19
G H Renkema, G Visser, F Baertling, L T Wintjes, V M Wolters, J van Montfrans, G A P de Kort, P G J Nikkels, P M van Hasselt, S N van der Crabben, R J T Rodenburg
The genetic basis of the many progressive, multi systemic, mitochondrial diseases that cause a lack of cellular ATP production is heterogeneous, with defects found both in the mitochondrial genome as well as in the nuclear genome. Many different mutations have been found in the genes encoding subunits of the enzyme complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation system. In addition, mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in the assembly of these complexes are known to cause mitochondrial disorders. Here we describe two sisters with a mitochondrial disease characterized by lesions in the medulla oblongata, as demonstrated by brain magnetic resonance imaging, and an isolated complex IV deficiency and reduced levels of individual complex IV subunits...
April 6, 2017: Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28382513/rna-splicing-and-splicing-regulator-changes-in-prostate-cancer-pathology
#20
REVIEW
Jennifer Munkley, Karen Livermore, Prabhakar Rajan, David J Elliott
Changes in mRNA splice patterns have been associated with key pathological mechanisms in prostate cancer progression. The androgen receptor (abbreviated AR) transcription factor is a major driver of prostate cancer pathology and activated by androgen steroid hormones. Selection of alternative promoters by the activated AR can critically alter gene function by switching mRNA isoform production, including creating a pro-oncogenic isoform of the normally tumour suppressor gene TSC2. A number of androgen-regulated genes generate alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms, including a prostate-specific splice isoform of ST6GALNAC1 mRNA...
April 5, 2017: Human Genetics
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