journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Journal of Medicine and Philosophy

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29850842/a-potential-tension-in-dsm-5-the-general-definition-of-mental-disorder-versus-some-specific-diagnostic-criteria
#1
M Cristina Amoretti, Elisabetta Lalumera
The general concept of mental disorder specified in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is definitional in character: a mental disorder might be identified with a harmful dysfunction. The manual also contains the explicit claim that each individual mental disorder should meet the requirements posed by the definition. The aim of this article is two-fold. First, we shall analyze the definition of the superordinate concept of mental disorder to better understand what necessary (and sufficient) criteria actually characterize such a concept...
May 30, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29986067/michel-foucault-and-the-problematics-of-power-theorizing-dtca-and-medicalized-subjectivity
#2
Black Hawk Hancock
This article explores Foucault's two different notions of power: one where the subject is constituted by power-knowledge relations and another that emphasizes how power is a central feature of human action. By drawing out these two conceptualizations of power, Foucault's work contributes three critical points to the formation of medicalized subjectivities: (1) the issue of medicalization needs to be discussed both in terms of both specific practices and holistically (within the carceral archipelago); (2) we need to think how we as human beings are "disciplined" and "subjectivated" through medicalization, as discourses, practices, and institutions are all crystallizations of power relations; and (3) we need to reflect on how we can "resist" this process of subjectification, since "power comes from below" and patients shape themselves through "technologies of the self...
July 9, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29986066/boorse-s-theory-of-disease-why-do-values-matter
#3
Brent M Kious
There has been much debate about whether the concept of disease articulated in Boorse's biostatistical theory is value-neutral or value-laden. Here, I want to examine whether this debate matters. I suggest that there are two basic respects in which value-ladenness might be important: it could threaten either scientific legitimacy or moral permissibility. I argue that value-ladenness does not threaten the scientific legitimacy of our disease-concept because the concept makes little difference to the formulation and testing of scientific hypotheses...
July 9, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29986065/a-new-approach-to-defining-disease
#4
Mary Jean Walker, Wendy A Rogers
In this paper, we examine recent critiques of the debate about defining disease, which claim that its use of conceptual analysis embeds the problematic assumption that the concept is classically structured. These critiques suggest, instead, developing plural stipulative definitions. Although we substantially agree with these critiques, we resist their implication that no general definition of "disease" is possible. We offer an alternative, inductive argument that disease cannot be classically defined and that the best explanation for this is that the concept is structured as a cluster...
July 9, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29986064/a-practice-oriented-review-of-health-concepts
#5
Beatrijs Haverkamp, Bernice Bovenkerk, Marcel F Verweij
Whereas theories on health generally argue in favor of one specific concept, we argue that, given the variety of health practices, we need different concepts of health. We thus approach health concepts as a Wittgensteinian family of thick concepts. By discussing five concepts of health offered by (philosophical) theory, we argue that all capture something that seems relevant when we talk and think about health. Classifying these concepts reveals their family resemblances: each of these concepts differs from the others in at least one respect and resembles the others in several respects...
July 9, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29986063/an-epistemic-argument-for-research-practice-integration-in-medicine
#6
Robyn Bluhm, Kirstin Borgerson
Arguments in favor of greater research-practice integration in medicine have tended to be ethical, political, or pragmatic. There are good epistemic reasons to pursue greater integration, and it is important to think through these reasons in order to avoid inadvertently designing new systems in ways that replicate the epistemic elitism common within current systems. Meaningful transformation within health care is possible with close attention to all reasons in favor of greater research-practice integration, including epistemic reasons...
July 9, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29746687/medicine-without-cure-a-cluster-analysis-of-the-nature-of-medicine
#7
Thaddeus Metz
In his article "Prediction, Understanding, and Medicine," Alex Broadbent argues that the nature of medicine is determined by its competences, that is, which things it can do well. He argues that although medicine cannot cure well, it can do a good job of enabling people not only to understand states of the human organism and of what has caused them, but also to predict future states of it. From this, Broadbent concludes that medicine is (at least in part) essentially a practice of understanding and predicting, not curing...
May 9, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29746686/taking-respect-seriously-clinical-research-and-the-demands-of-informed-consent
#8
Lynn A Jansen
There is broad agreement among research ethicists that investigators have a duty to obtain the informed consent of all subjects who participate in their research trials. On a common view, the duty to obtain this informed consent follows from the need to respect persons and their autonomous decisions. However, the nature of informed consent and the demands it places on investigators are open to dispute and recently have been challenged. Respect for persons, it has been claimed, does not require investigators to guarantee that the subjects enrolled in their trials comprehend the risk/benefit information disclosed to them or even that they appreciate the difference between research and therapy...
May 9, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29746685/the-continuing-allure-of-cure-a-response-to-alex-broadbent-s-prediction-understanding-and-medicine
#9
Chadwin Harris
In "Prediction, Understanding, and Medicine," Alex Broadbent rejects the curative thesis, the view that the core medical competence is to cure, in favor of his predictive thesis that the main intellectual medical competence is to explain and the main practical medical competence is to predict. Broadbent thinks his account explains the phenomenon of multiple consultation, which is the fact that people persist in consulting alternative medical traditions despite having access to mainstream medicine...
May 9, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29746684/prediction-understanding-and-medicine
#10
Alex Broadbent
What is medicine? One obvious answer in the context of the contemporary clinical tradition is that medicine is the process of curing sick people. However, this "curative thesis" is not satisfactory, even when "cure" is defined generously and even when exceptions such as cosmetic surgery are set aside. Historian of medicine Roy Porter argues that the position of medicine in society has had, and still has, little to do with its ability to make people better. Moreover, the efficacy of medicine for improving population health has been famously doubted by historians and epidemiologists...
May 9, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29746683/intellectualizing-medicine-a-reply-to-commentaries-on-prediction-understanding-and-medicine
#11
Alex Broadbent
This article is a reply to two critics of my "Prediction, Understanding, and Medicine," published elsewhere in this journal issue. In that essay, I argued that medicine is best understood not as essentially a curative enterprise, but rather as one essentially oriented towards prediction and understanding. Here, I defend this position from several criticisms made of it.
May 9, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29546416/embodied-concepts-and-mental-health
#12
Somogy Varga
Often drawing on the phenomenological tradition, a number of philosophers and cognitive scientists working in the field of "embodied cognition" subscribe to the general view that cognition is grounded in aspects of its sensorimotor embodiment and should be comprehended as the result of a dynamic interaction of nonneural and neural processes. After a brief introduction, the paper critically engages Lakoff and Johnson's "conceptual metaphor theory" (CMT), and provides a review of recent empirical evidence that appears to support it...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29546415/misconceptions-inherent-in-the-substance-ontology-approach-to-assigning-moral-status-a-reply-to-patrick-lee-christopher-tollefsen-and-robert-george
#13
Jason Z Morris
I have argued that substance ontology cannot be used to determine the moral status of embryos. Patrick Lee, Christopher Tollefsen, and Robert George wrote a Reply to those arguments in this Journal. In that Reply, Lee, Tollefsen, and George defended and clarified their position that their substance ontology arguments prove that the zygote and the adult into which it develops are the same entity that share the same essence. Here, I show the following: (A) Even using the substance ontology framework to which Lee, Tollefsen, and George subscribe, we cannot know when in development substance changes cease...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29546414/donation-after-the-circulatory-determination-of-death-some-responses-to-recent-criticisms
#14
Andrew McGee, Dale Gardiner
This article defends the criterion of permanence as a valid criterion for declaring death against some well-known recent objections. We argue that it is reasonable to adopt the criterion of permanence for declaring death, given how difficult it is to know when the point of irreversibility is actually reached. We claim that this point applies in all contexts, including the donation after circulatory determination of death context. We also examine some of the potentially unpalatable ramifications, for current death declaration practices, of adopting the irreversibility criterion...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29546413/human-animal-chimeras-and-hybrids-an-ethical-paradox-behind-moral-confusion
#15
Dietmar Hübner
The prospect of creating and using human-animal chimeras and hybrids (HACHs) that are significantly human-like in their composition, phenotype, cognition, or behavior meets with divergent moral judgments: on the one side, it is claimed that such beings might be candidates for human-analogous rights to protection and care; on the other side, it is supposed that their existence might disturb fundamental natural and social orders. This paper tries to show that both positions are paradoxically intertwined: they rely on two kinds of species arguments, "individual species arguments" and "group species arguments," which formulate opposing demands but are conceptually interdependent...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29546412/the-moral-status-of-the-human-embryo
#16
Mark T Brown
Moral status ascribes equal obligations and rights to individuals on the basis of membership in a protected group. Substance change is an event that results in the origin or cessation of individuals who may be members of groups with equal moral status. In this paper, two substance changes that affect the moral status of human embryos are identified. The first substance change begins with fertilization and ends with the formation of the blastocyst, a biological individual with moral status comparable to that ascribed to human organs...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29301011/should-mitochondrial-donation-be-anonymous
#17
John B Appleby
Currently in the United Kingdom, anyone donating gametes has the status of an open-identity donor. This means that, at the age of 18, persons conceived with gametes donated since April 1, 2005 have a right to access certain pieces of identifying information about their donor. However, in early 2015, the UK Parliament approved new regulations that make mitochondrial donors anonymous. Both mitochondrial donation and gamete donation are similar in the basic sense that they involve the contribution of gamete materials to create future persons...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29342286/the-ethics-of-general-population-preventive-genomic-sequencing-rights-and-social-justice
#18
Clair Morrissey, Rebecca L Walker
Advances in DNA sequencing technology open new possibilities for public health genomics, especially in the form of general population preventive genomic sequencing (PGS). Such screening programs would sit at the intersection of public health and preventive health care, and thereby at once invite and resist the use of clinical ethics and public health ethics frameworks. Despite their differences, these ethics frameworks traditionally share a central concern for individual rights. We examine two putative individual rights-the right not to know, and the child's right to an open future-frequently invoked in discussions of predictive genetic testing, in order to explore their potential contribution to evaluating this new practice...
January 12, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29342285/serial-participation-and-the-ethics-of-phase-1-healthy-volunteer-research
#19
Rebecca L Walker, Marci D Cottingham, Jill A Fisher
Phase 1 healthy volunteer clinical trials-which financially compensate subjects in tests of drug toxicity levels and side effects-appear to place pressure on each joint of the moral framework justifying research. In this article, we review concerns about phase 1 trials as they have been framed in the bioethics literature, including undue inducement and coercion, unjust exploitation, and worries about compromised data validity. We then revisit these concerns in light of the lived experiences of serial participants who are income-dependent on phase 1 trials...
January 12, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29342284/two-ways-to-kill-a-patient
#20
Ben Bronner
According to the Standard View, a doctor who withdraws life-sustaining treatment does not kill the patient but rather allows the patient to die-an important distinction, according to some. I argue that killing (and causing death) can be understood in either of two ways, and given the relevant understanding, the Standard View is insulated from typical criticisms. I conclude by noting several problems for the Standard View that remain to be fully addressed.
January 12, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
journal
journal
26833
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"