journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Journal of Medicine and Philosophy

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27932398/knowledge-and-belief-in-placebo-effect
#1
Daniele Chiffi, Renzo Zanotti
The beliefs involved in the placebo effect are often assumed to be self-fulfilling, that is, the truth of these beliefs would merely require the patient to hold them. Such a view is commonly shared in epistemology. Many epistemologists focused, in fact, on the self-fulfilling nature of these beliefs, which have been investigated because they raise some important counterexamples to Nozick's "tracking theory of knowledge." We challenge the self-fulfilling nature of placebo-based beliefs in multi-agent contexts, analyzing their deep epistemological nature and the role of higher-order beliefs involved in the placebo effect...
December 7, 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27932397/sound-trust-and-the-ethics-of-telecare
#2
Sander A Voerman, Philip J Nickel
The adoption of web-based telecare services has raised multifarious ethical concerns, but a traditional principle-based approach provides limited insight into how these concerns might be addressed and what, if anything, makes them problematic. We take an alternative approach, diagnosing some of the main concerns as arising from a core phenomenon of shifting trust relations that come about when the physician plays a less central role in the delivery of care, and new actors and entities are introduced. Correspondingly, we propose an applied ethics of trust based on the idea that patients should be provided with good reasons to trust telecare services, which we call sound trust...
December 7, 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27932396/narrative-aversion-challenges-for-the-illness-narrative-advocate
#3
Kathy Behrendt
Engaging in self-narrative is often touted as a powerful antidote to the bad effects of illness. However, there are various examples of what may broadly be termed "aversion" to illness narrative. I group these into three kinds: aversion to certain types of illness narrative; aversion to illness narrative as a whole; and aversion to illness narrative as an essentially therapeutic endeavor. These aversions can throw into doubt the advantages claimed for the illness narrator, including the key benefits of repair to the damage illness does to identity and life-trajectory...
December 7, 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27758806/beyond-the-anticipatory-corpse-future-perspectives-for-bioethics
#4
Hille Haker
This essay explores the two main objectives of Bishop's book, which he analyzes in the context of the care for the dying: (1) the medical metaphysics underlying medical science and (2) biopolitics as governance of the human body. This essay discusses Bishop's claims in view of newer developments in medicine, especially the turn to the construction of life, and confronts the concept of the patient's sovereignty with an alternative model of vulnerable agency. In order to overcome the impasses of contemporary bioethics, the essay argues that practical reason requires a two-fold ethics: first, it must develop a new hermeneutics of illness and disease, and second, in order to protect the individuals in the process of dying, moral claims concerning death must be based on the concept of human rights...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27758805/diagnosis-and-therapy-in-the-anticipatory-corpse-a-second-opinion
#5
Brett McCarty
In The Anticipatory Corpse, Jeffrey Bishop claims that modern medicine has lost formal and final causality as the dead body has become epistemologically normative, and that a singular focus on efficient and material causality has thoroughly distorted modern medical practice. Bishop implies that the renewal of medicine will require its housing in alternate social spaces. This essay critiques both Bishop's diagnosis and therapy by arguing, first, that alternate social imaginaries, though perhaps marginalized, are already present within the practice of medicine...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27659583/good-deaths-stupid-deaths-humane-medicine-and-the-call-of-invisible-bodies
#6
Maura A Ryan
Jeffrey Bishop's The Anticipatory Corpse exposes a functional metaphysics at the root of contemporary medical practice that gives rise to inhumane medicine, especially at the end of life. His critique of medicine argues for alternative spaces and practices in which the communal significance of the body, its telos, can be restored and the meaning of a "good death" enriched. This essay develops an alternative epistemology of the body, drawing from Christian theological accounts of the communal or Eucharistic body and linking liturgical practices to the cultivation of solidarity...
September 22, 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27659582/beyond-the-anticipatory-corpse-medicine-power-and-the-care-of-the-dying-a-theoretical-and-methodological-intervention-into-the-sociology-of-brain-implant-surgery
#7
Black Hawk Hancock, Daniel R Morrison
Drawing on and extending the Foucaultian philosophical framework that Jeffrey Bishop develops in his masterful book, The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying, we undertake a sociological analysis of the neurological procedure-deep brain stimulation (DBS)-which implants electrodes in the brain, powered by a pacemaker-like device, for the treatment of movement disorders. Following Bishop's work, we carry out this analysis through a two-fold strategy. First, we examine how a multidisciplinary team evaluates candidates for this implant at a major medical center...
September 22, 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27649992/from-the-anticipatory-corpse-to-the-participatory-body
#8
M Therese Lysaught
Jeffrey Bishop's The Anticipatory Corpse demonstrates how death is present in and cloaked by contemporary practices of end-of-life care. A key to Bishop's argument is that for modern medicine the cadaver has become epistemologically normative and that a metaphysics shorn of formal and final causes now shapes contemporary healthcare practices. The essays of this symposium laud and interrogate Bishop's argument in three ways. First, they raise critical methodological challenges from the perspectives of human rights, Charles Taylor's concept of social imaginaries, and economics...
September 20, 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27856647/subscriptions-page
#9
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27856646/cover
#10
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27856645/table-of-contents
#11
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27856644/corrigendum
#12
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27856643/the-journal-of-medicine-and-philosophy-would-like-to-thank-the-following-guest-reviewers-for-their-help-during-the-past-year
#13
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27856642/joseph-m-boyle-in-memoriam
#14
Christopher Tollefsen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27694242/from-anticipatory-corpse-to-posthuman-god
#15
Jeffrey P Bishop
The essays in this issue of JMP are devoted to critical engagement of my book, The Anticipatory Corpse The essays, for the most part, accept the main thrust of my critique of medicine. The main thrust of the criticism is whether the scope of the critique is too totalizing, and whether the proposed remedy is sufficient. I greatly appreciate these interventions because they allow me this occasion to respond and clarify, and to even further extend the argument of my book. In this response essay, I maintain that the regnant social imaginary of medicine is the regnant social imaginary of our time...
December 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27591214/subscriptions-page
#16
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27591213/editorial-board
#17
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27591212/cover
#18
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27591211/table-of-contents
#19
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27476188/the-experiential-paradoxes-of-pain
#20
Drew Leder
Pain is far more than an aversive sensation. Chronic pain, in particular, involves the sufferer in a complex experience filled with ambiguity and paradox. The tensions thereby established, the unknowns, pressures, and oscillations, form a significant part of the painfulness of pain. This paper uses a phenomenological method to examine nine such paradoxes. For example, pain can be both immediate sensation and mediated by complex interpretations. It is a certainty for the experiencer, yet highly uncertain in character...
October 2016: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
journal
journal
26833
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"