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Journal of Fluency Disorders

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29735345/corrigendum-to-communication-attitudes-in-children-who-stutter-a-meta-analytic-review-j-fluency-disord-46c-2015-1-14
#1
Linn Stokke Guttormsen, Elaina Kefalianos, Kari-Anne B Naess
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 4, 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29723729/cortical-associates-of-emotional-reactivity-and-regulation-in-childhood-stuttering
#2
Hatun Zengin-Bolatkale, Edward G Conture, Alexandra P Key, Tedra A Walden, Robin M Jones
PURPOSE: This study sought to determine the cortical associates of emotional reactivity and emotion regulation (as indexed by the amplitude of evoked response potentials [ERP]) in young children who do and do not stutter during passive viewing of pleasant, unpleasant and neutral pictures. METHOD: Participants were 17 young children who stutter and 22 young children who do not stutter (between 4 years 0 months to 6 years 11 months). The dependent measures were (1) mean amplitude of late positive potential (LPP, an ERP sensitive to emotional stimuli) during passive (i...
April 19, 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29723728/fluency-bank-a-new-resource-for-fluency-research-and-practice
#3
Nan Bernstein Ratner, Brian MacWhinney
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 29, 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29602052/comparison-of-adults-who-stutter-with-and-without-social-anxiety-disorder
#4
Lisa Iverach, Mark Jones, Robyn Lowe, Susan O'Brian, Ross G Menzies, Ann Packman, Mark Onslow
PURPOSE: Social anxiety disorder is a debilitating anxiety disorder associated with significant life impairment. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate overall functioning for adults who stutter with and without a diagnosis of social anxiety disorder. METHOD: Participants were 275 adults who stuttered (18-80 years), including 219 males (79.6%) and 56 females (20.4%), who were enrolled to commence speech treatment for stuttering. Comparisons were made between participants diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (n = 82, 29...
March 19, 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29054456/from-locations-to-networks-can-brain-imaging-inform-treatment-of-stuttering
#5
EDITORIAL
Katrin Neumann, Anne L Foundas
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29050641/white-matter-pathways-in-persistent-developmental-stuttering-lessons-from-tractography
#6
Vered Kronfeld-Duenias, Oren Civier, Ofer Amir, Ruth Ezrati-Vinacour, Michal Ben-Shachar
PURPOSE: Fluent speech production relies on the coordinated processing of multiple brain regions. This highlights the role of neural pathways that connect distinct brain regions in producing fluent speech. Here, we aim to investigate the role of the white matter pathways in persistent developmental stuttering (PDS), where speech fluency is disrupted. METHODS: We use diffusion weighted imaging and tractography to compare the white matter properties between adults who do and do not stutter...
March 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28958627/assisted-and-unassisted-recession-of-functional-anomalies-associated-with-dysprosody-in-adults-who-stutter
#7
Katrin Neumann, Harald A Euler, Malte Kob, Alexander Wolff von Gudenberg, Anne-Lise Giraud, Tobias Weissgerber, Christian A Kell
PURPOSE: Speech in persons who stutter (PWS) is associated with disturbed prosody (speech melody and intonation), which may impact communication. The neural correlates of PWS' altered prosody during speaking are not known, neither is how a speech-restructuring therapy affects prosody at both a behavioral and a cerebral level. METHODS: In this fMRI study, we explored group differences in brain activation associated with the production of different kinds of prosody in 13 male adults who stutter (AWS) before, directly after, and at least 1 year after an effective intensive fluency-shaping treatment, in 13 typically fluent-speaking control participants (CP), and in 13 males who had spontaneously recovered from stuttering during adulthood (RAWS), while sentences were read aloud with 'neutral', instructed emotional (happy), and linguistically driven (questioning) prosody...
March 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28778745/a-systematic-literature-review-of-neuroimaging-research-on-developmental-stuttering-between-1995-and-2016
#8
REVIEW
Andrew C Etchell, Oren Civier, Kirrie J Ballard, Paul F Sowman
PURPOSE: Stuttering is a disorder that affects millions of people all over the world. Over the past two decades, there has been a great deal of interest in investigating the neural basis of the disorder. This systematic literature review is intended to provide a comprehensive summary of the neuroimaging literature on developmental stuttering. It is a resource for researchers to quickly and easily identify relevant studies for their areas of interest and enable them to determine the most appropriate methodology to utilize in their work...
March 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28648465/planum-temporale-asymmetry-in-people-who-stutter
#9
Patricia M Gough, Emily L Connally, Peter Howell, David Ward, Jennifer Chesters, Kate E Watkins
PURPOSE: Previous studies have reported that the planum temporale - a language-related structure that normally shows a leftward asymmetry - had reduced asymmetry in people who stutter (PWS) and reversed asymmetry in those with severe stuttering. These findings are consistent with the theory that altered language lateralization may be a cause or consequence of stuttering. Here, we re-examined these findings in a larger sample of PWS. METHODS: We evaluated planum temporale asymmetry in structural MRI scans obtained from 67 PWS and 63 age-matched controls using: 1) manual measurements of the surface area; 2) voxel-based morphometry to automatically calculate grey matter density...
March 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28595893/altered-morphology-of-the-nucleus-accumbens-in-persistent-developmental-stuttering
#10
Nicole E Neef, Christoph Bütfering, Tibor Auer, F Luise Metzger, Harald A Euler, Jens Frahm, Walter Paulus, Martin Sommer
PURPOSE: Neuroimaging studies in persistent developmental stuttering repeatedly report altered basal ganglia functions. Together with thalamus and cerebellum, these structures mediate sensorimotor functions and thus represent a plausible link between stuttering and neuroanatomy. However, stuttering is a complex, multifactorial disorder. Besides sensorimotor functions, emotional and social-motivational factors constitute major aspects of the disorder. Here, we investigated cortical and subcortical gray matter regions to study whether persistent developmental stuttering is also linked to alterations of limbic structures...
March 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577876/a-preliminary-study-on-the-neural-oscillatory-characteristics-of-motor-preparation-prior-to-dysfluent-and-fluent-utterances-in-adults-who-stutter
#11
Anna Mersov, Douglas Cheyne, Cecilia Jobst, Luc De Nil
PURPOSE: Recent literature on speech production in adults who stutter (AWS) has begun to investigate the neural mechanisms characterizing speech-motor preparation prior to speech onset. Compelling evidence has suggested that stuttering is associated with atypical processing within cortical and sub-cortical motor networks, particularly in the beta frequency range, that is effective before speech production even begins. Due to low stuttering frequency in experimental settings, however, the literature has so far predominantly reported on fluent speech production in AWS...
March 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28413060/stuttering-treatment-and-brain-research-in-adults-a-still-unfolding-relationship
#12
REVIEW
Roger J Ingham, Janis C Ingham, Harald A Euler, Katrin Neumann
PURPOSE: Brain imaging and brain stimulation procedures have now been used for more than two decades to investigate the neural systems that contribute to the occurrence of stuttering in adults, and to identify processes that might enhance recovery from stuttering. The purpose of this paper is to review the extent to which these dual lines of research with adults who stutter have intersected and whether they are contributing towards the alleviation of this impairment. METHOD: Several areas of research are reviewed in order to determine whether research on the neurology of stuttering is showing any potential for advancing the treatment of this communication disorder: (a) attempts to discover the neurology of stuttering, (b) neural changes associated with treated recovery, and (c) direct neural intervention...
March 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28216127/speaking-related-changes-in-cortical-functional-connectivity-associated-with-assisted-and-spontaneous-recovery-from-developmental-stuttering
#13
Christian A Kell, Katrin Neumann, Marion Behrens, Alexander W von Gudenberg, Anne-Lise Giraud
We previously reported speaking-related activity changes associated with assisted recovery induced by a fluency shaping therapy program and unassisted recovery from developmental stuttering (Kell et al., Brain 2009). While assisted recovery re-lateralized activity to the left hemisphere, unassisted recovery was specifically associated with the activation of the left BA 47/12 in the lateral orbitofrontal cortex. These findings suggested plastic changes in speaking-related functional connectivity between left hemispheric speech network nodes...
March 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214015/anomalous-network-architecture-of-the-resting-brain-in-children-who-stutter
#14
Soo-Eun Chang, Michael Angstadt, Ho Ming Chow, Andrew C Etchell, Emily O Garnett, Ai Leen Choo, Daniel Kessler, Robert C Welsh, Chandra Sripada
PURPOSE: We combined a large longitudinal neuroimaging dataset that includes children who do and do not stutter and a whole-brain network analysis in order to examine the intra- and inter-network connectivity changes associated with stuttering. Additionally, we asked whether whole brain connectivity patterns observed at the initial year of scanning could predict persistent stuttering in later years. METHODS: A total of 224 high-quality resting state fMRI scans collected from 84 children (42 stuttering, 42 controls) were entered into an independent component analysis (ICA), yielding a number of distinct network connectivity maps ("components") as well as expression scores for each component that quantified the degree to which it is expressed for each child...
March 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29602051/children-who-stutter-at-3-years-of-age-a-community-based-study
#15
Michiko Shimada, Akira Toyomura, Tetsunoshin Fujii, Takayuki Minami
PURPOSE: Lack of social resources to support children who stutter may be due, in part, to the absence of epidemiological data regarding stuttering. This study investigated the proportion of three-year-old children who stutter in a city located in Hokkaido, a northern island of Japan. METHODS: The speech of individual children was assessed as part of a routine, government-conducted health care examination for 3-year-old children. The number of children screened was 2274, or 94...
February 22, 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29494965/exogenously-triggered-response-inhibition-in-developmental-stuttering
#16
Kurt Eggers, Luc F De Nil, Bea R H Van den Bergh
PURPOSE: The purpose of the present study was to examine relations between children's exogenously triggered response inhibition and stuttering. METHOD: Participants were 18 children who stutter (CWS; mean age = 9;01 years) and 18 children who not stutter (CWNS; mean age = 9;01 years). Participants were matched on age (±3 months) and gender. Response inhibition was assessed by a stop signal task (Verbruggen, Logan, & Stevens, 2008). RESULTS: Results suggest that CWS, compared to CWNS, perform comparable to CWNS in a task where response control is externally triggered...
February 21, 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29454469/use-of-a-phoneme-monitoring-task-to-examine-lexical-access-in-adults-who-do-and-do-not-stutter
#17
Timothy A Howell, Nan Bernstein Ratner
Previous work has postulated that a deficit in lexicalization may be an underlying cause of a stuttering disorder (Prins, Main, & Wampler, 1997; Wingate, 1988). This study investigates the time course of lexicalization of nouns and verbs in adults who stutter. A generalized phoneme monitoring (PM) paradigm was used. Adults who stutter (AWS) and typically-fluent peers both showed an expected effect of word class (verbs yielded slower and less accurate monitoring than nouns), as well as phoneme position (word medial/final phonemes yielded slower and less accurate monitoring than word initial phonemes)...
February 6, 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29443692/executive-function-and-childhood-stuttering-parent-ratings-and-evidence-from-a-behavioral-task
#18
Katerina Ntourou, Julie D Anderson, Stacy A Wagovich
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the executive function (EF) abilities of preschool children who do (CWS) and do not stutter (CWNS) using a parent-report questionnaire and a behavioral task. METHOD: Participants were 75 CWS and 75 CWNS between the ages of 3;0 and 5;11 (years; months). Parents rated their children's EF abilities using the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Preschool Version (BRIEF-P; Gioia, Espy, & Isquith, 2003)...
December 30, 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29223687/effect-of-control-samples-and-listener-attributes-on-speech-naturalness-ratings-of-people-who-stutter
#19
Brenda Carey, Shane Erickson, Susan Block
PURPOSE: Speech restructuring treatment can effectively reduce stuttering but the resultant speech may sound unnatural. Martin et al. (1984) speech naturalness scale is widely used by clinicians and researchers, yet little is known about whether including normally fluent speech samples alters the judgement of the naturalness of speech samples of people who stutter, and whether attributes of listeners - specifically training and sex - influence ratings. METHODS: In this study 20 untrained listeners (male and female) and 19 speech language pathology students (female only) rated either the naturalness of 21 speech samples from adults who stutter obtained post-treatment, or the same 21 post-treatment samples randomly mixed with samples of 21 samples from normally fluent speakers matched for age and sex...
December 6, 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195626/effects-of-emotion-on-the-acoustic-parameters-in-adults-who-stutter-an-exploratory-study
#20
Kim R Bauerly, Jessica Paxton
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
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