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Journal of Fluency Disorders

Kurt Eggers, Luc F De Nil, Bea R H Van den Bergh
PURPOSE: The purpose of the present study was to examine relations between children's exogenously triggered response inhibition and stuttering. METHOD: Participants were 18 children who stutter (CWS; mean age = 9;01 years) and 18 children who not stutter (CWNS; mean age = 9;01 years). Participants were matched on age (±3 months) and gender. Response inhibition was assessed by a stop signal task (Verbruggen, Logan, & Stevens, 2008). RESULTS: Results suggest that CWS, compared to CWNS, perform comparable to CWNS in a task where response control is externally triggered...
February 21, 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Timothy A Howell, Nan Bernstein Ratner
Previous work has postulated that a deficit in lexicalization may be an underlying cause of a stuttering disorder (Prins, Main, & Wampler, 1997; Wingate, 1988). This study investigates the time course of lexicalization of nouns and verbs in adults who stutter. A generalized phoneme monitoring (PM) paradigm was used. Adults who stutter (AWS) and typically-fluent peers both showed an expected effect of word class (verbs yielded slower and less accurate monitoring than nouns), as well as phoneme position (word medial/final phonemes yielded slower and less accurate monitoring than word initial phonemes)...
February 6, 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Katerina Ntourou, Julie D Anderson, Stacy A Wagovich
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the executive function (EF) abilities of preschool children who do (CWS) and do not stutter (CWNS) using a parent-report questionnaire and a behavioral task. METHOD: Participants were 75 CWS and 75 CWNS between the ages of 3;0 and 5;11 (years; months). Parents rated their children's EF abilities using the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Preschool Version (BRIEF-P; Gioia, Espy, & Isquith, 2003). Children's ability to integrate cognitive flexibility, inhibitory control, and working memory was measured using a behavioral task, the Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders (HTKS; Cameron Ponitz, McClelland, Matthews, & Morrison, 2009)...
December 30, 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Katrin Neumann, Anne L Foundas
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Brenda Carey, Shane Erickson, Susan Block
PURPOSE: Speech restructuring treatment can effectively reduce stuttering but the resultant speech may sound unnatural. Martin et al. (1984) speech naturalness scale is widely used by clinicians and researchers, yet little is known about whether including normally fluent speech samples alters the judgement of the naturalness of speech samples of people who stutter, and whether attributes of listeners - specifically training and sex - influence ratings. METHODS: In this study 20 untrained listeners (male and female) and 19 speech language pathology students (female only) rated either the naturalness of 21 speech samples from adults who stutter obtained post-treatment, or the same 21 post-treatment samples randomly mixed with samples of 21 samples from normally fluent speakers matched for age and sex...
December 6, 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Kim R Bauerly, Jessica Paxton
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Debora Freud, Ruth Ezrati-Vinacour, Nitza Katz-Bernstein, Leah Fostick
PURPOSE: This groundbreaking research compares the experience of stuttering among adult male People Who Stutter (PWS) from the ultra-Orthodox (UO) Jewish community in Israel to those from Secular/Traditional (ST) backgrounds. METHODS: Participants were 32 UO and 31 ST PWS, aged 18-67 years. Self-report questionnaires utilized: Perceived Stuttering Severity (PSS); Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering (OASES-A); Students' Life Satisfaction Scale (SLSS); Situation Avoidance Behavior Checklist (SABC)...
December 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Alice Carter, Lauren Breen, J Scott Yaruss, Janet Beilby
PURPOSE: Self-efficacy has emerged as a potential predictor of quality of life for adults who stutter. Research has focused primarily on the positive relationship self-efficacy has to treatment outcomes, but little is known about the relationship between self-efficacy and quality of life for adults who stutter. The purpose of this mixed- methods study is to determine the predictive value of self-efficacy and its relationship to quality of life for adults who stutter. METHOD: The Self-Efficacy Scale for Adult Stutterers and the Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience with Stuttering were administered to 39 adults who stutter, aged 18- 77...
December 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Courtney T Byrd, Robyn Croft, Zoi Gkalitsiou, Elizabeth Hampton
PURPOSE: The purpose of the present study was to explore the clinical utility of self-disclosure, particularly, whether disclosing in an informative manner would result in more positive observer ratings of the speaker who stutters than either disclosing in an apologetic manner or choosing not to self-disclose at all. METHOD: Observers (N=338) were randomly assigned to view one of six possible videos (i.e., adult male informative self-disclosure, adult male apologetic self-disclosure, adult male no self-disclosure, adult female informative self-disclosure, adult female apologetic self-disclosure, adult female no self-disclosure)...
December 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Emily Monteagudo, Jean Sawyer, Alyssa Sivek-Eskra
PURPOSE: To determine the efficacy of treatment based on Kristin Linklater's technique for vocal preparation for performance for use with people who stutter. METHOD: A protocol for a treatment for stuttering involving breathing exercises, relaxation techniques, and focus on awareness was designed by the first author from Linklater's published exercises in her book Freeing the Natural Voice (2006). Four adults who stutter participated in a 12-week, single-case reversal design study...
December 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Aysu Erdemir, Tedra A Walden, Caswell M Jefferson, Dahye Choi, Robin M Jones
PURPOSE: This study investigated the possible association of emotional processes and articulation rate in pre-school age children who stutter and persist (persisting), children who stutter and recover (recovered) and children who do not stutter (nonstuttering). METHODS: The participants were ten persisting, ten recovered, and ten nonstuttering children between the ages of 3-5 years; who were classified as persisting, recovered, or nonstuttering approximately 2-2...
November 22, 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Yoshikazu Kikuchi, Toshiro Umezaki, Taira Uehara, Hiroo Yamaguchi, Koji Yamashita, Akio Hiwatashi, Motohiro Sawatsubashi, Kazuo Adachi, Yumi Yamaguchi, Daisuke Murakami, Jun-Ichi Kira, Takashi Nakagawa
Both developmental and acquired stuttering are related to the function of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical loop, which includes the putamen. Here, we present a case of stuttering- and palilalia-like dysfluencies that manifested as an early symptom of multiple system atrophy-parkinsonian type (MSA-P) and bilateral atrophy of the putamen. The patient was a 72-year-old man with no history of developmental stuttering who presented with a stutter for consultation with our otorhinolaryngology department. The patient was diagnosed with MSA-P based on parkinsonism, autonomic dysfunction, and bilateral putaminal atrophy revealed by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging...
November 14, 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Naomi Eichorn, Klara Marton, Steven Pirutinsky
PURPOSE: Multifactorial explanations of developmental stuttering suggest that difficulties in self-regulation and weak attentional flexibility contribute to persisting stuttering. We tested this prediction by examining whether preschool-age children who stutter (CWS) shift their attention less flexibly than children who do not stutter (CWNS) during a modified version of the Dimension Card Change Sort (DCCS), a reliable measure of attention switching for young children. METHODS: Sixteen CWS (12 males) and 30 children CWNS (11 males) participated in the study...
November 13, 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Yvonne Tran, Elaine Blumgart, Ashley Craig
PURPOSE: Many adults who stutter have elevated negative mood states like anxiety and depressive mood. Little is known about how mood states change over time. The purpose of this study was to determine the trajectories or sub-types of mood states in adults who stutter over a 6 month period, and establish factors that contribute to these sub-types. METHOD: Participants included 129 adults who stutter who completed an assessment regimen at baseline, including a measure of mood states (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised)...
October 28, 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Michael P Boyle, Alison N Fearon
PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to identify potential relationships between self-stigma (stigma awareness and stigma application) and stress, physical health, and health care satisfaction among a large sample of adults who stutter. It was hypothesized that both stigma awareness and stigma application would be inversely related to measures of physical health and health care satisfaction, and positively related to stress. Furthermore, it was anticipated that stress mediated the relationship between self-stigma and physical health...
October 24, 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Vered Kronfeld-Duenias, Oren Civier, Ofer Amir, Ruth Ezrati-Vinacour, Michal Ben-Shachar
PURPOSE: Fluent speech production relies on the coordinated processing of multiple brain regions. This highlights the role of neural pathways that connect distinct brain regions in producing fluent speech. Here, we aim to investigate the role of the white matter pathways in persistent developmental stuttering (PDS), where speech fluency is disrupted. METHODS: We use diffusion weighted imaging and tractography to compare the white matter properties between adults who do and do not stutter...
September 13, 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Katrin Neumann, Harald A Euler, Malte Kob, Alexander Wolff von Gudenberg, Anne-Lise Giraud, Tobias Weissgerber, Christian A Kell
PURPOSE: Speech in persons who stutter (PWS) is associated with disturbed prosody (speech melody and intonation), which may impact communication. The neural correlates of PWS' altered prosody during speaking are not known, neither is how a speech-restructuring therapy affects prosody at both a behavioral and a cerebral level. METHODS: In this fMRI study, we explored group differences in brain activation associated with the production of different kinds of prosody in 13 male adults who stutter (AWS) before, directly after, and at least 1 year after an effective intensive fluency-shaping treatment, in 13 typically fluent-speaking control participants (CP), and in 13 males who had spontaneously recovered from stuttering during adulthood (RAWS), while sentences were read aloud with 'neutral', instructed emotional (happy), and linguistically driven (questioning) prosody...
September 9, 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Mohammad Alameer, Lotte Meteyard, David Ward
INTRODUCTION: Generalization of treatment is considered a difficult task for clinicians and people who stutter (PWS), and can constitute a barrier to long-term treatment success. To our knowledge, there are no standardized tests that collect measurement of the behavioral and cognitive aspects alongside the client's self-perception in real-life speaking situations. PURPOSE: This paper describes the preliminary development of a Stuttering Generalization Self-Measure (SGSM)...
September 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Christopher Dominick Constantino, Walter H Manning, Susan Naomi Nordstrom
PURPOSE: The experience of passing as fluent, also called covert stuttering, has been uncritically framed as an inherently negative pursuit. Historically passing has been understood as a repression of one's true, authentic self in response to either psychological distress or social discrimination. The authors of this paper seek a more nuanced understanding of passing. We ask, how must a person relate to herself in order to pass as fluent? METHODOLOGY: This is a qualitative research study in which the authors utilized the ethical theories of philosopher Michel Foucault to contextualize data obtained from semi-structured interviews with nine participants who pass as fluent...
September 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
Robert van de Vorst, Vincent L Gracco
PURPOSE: To investigate if non-verbal sensorimotor synchronization abilities in adult individuals who stutter (IWS) differ from non-stuttering controls (NS) under various performance conditions (tempo, auditory feedback, use of hands [single/both] and rhythm). METHODS: Participants were 11 IWS (5 males, 6 females, Mean age=25.8, SD=8.7) and 11 age- and gender-matched controls (Mean age=24.4, SD=8.4). During the experiment, participants were asked to prepare three melodies and subsequently perform them with a metronome at different rates and auditory feedback modalities (non-altered and suppressed)...
September 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
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