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Journal of Thermal Biology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28797480/can-acclimation-of-thermal-tolerance-in-adults-and-across-generations-act-as-a-buffer-against-climate-change-in-tropical-marine-ectotherms
#1
S A Morley, K D Nguyen, L S Peck, C-H Lai, K S Tan
Thermal acclimation capacity was investigated in adults of three tropical marine invertebrates, the subtidal barnacle Striatobalanus amaryllis, the intertidal gastropod Volegalea cochlidium and the intertidal barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite. To test the relative importance of transgenerational acclimation, the developmental acclimation capacity of A. amphitrite was investigated in F1 and F2 generations reared at a subset of the same incubation temperatures. The increase in CTmax (measured through loss of key behavioural metrics) of F0 adults across the incubation temperature range 25...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28797479/paralysis-and-heart-failure-precede-ion-balance-disruption-in-heat-stressed-european-green-crabs
#2
Lisa B Jørgensen, Johannes Overgaard, Heath A MacMillan
Acute exposure of ectotherms to critically high temperatures causes injury and death, and this mortality has been associated with a number of physiological perturbations including impaired oxygen transport, loss of ion and water homeostasis, and neuronal failure. It is difficult to discern which of these factors, if any, is the proximate cause of heat injury because, for example, loss of ion homeostasis can impair neuromuscular function (including cardiac function), and conversely impaired oxygen transport reduces ATP supply and can thus reduce ion transport capacity...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28797478/heat-stress-is-associated-with-disruption-of-ion-balance-in-the-migratory-locust-locusta-migratoria
#3
James D B O'Sullivan, Heath A MacMillan, Johannes Overgaard
Thermal tolerance is important in determining the spatial and temporal distributions of insects but the mechanisms which determine upper thermal limits remain poorly understood. In terrestrial insects heat tolerance is unlikely to be limited by oxygen supply but in some arthropods, heat stress has been shown to cause haemolymph hyperkalaemia which is known to have detrimental effects on neuromuscular excitability. It is however unresolved if heat-induced hyperkalemia is the cause or the result of cellular heat injury...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28797477/effects-of-oxygen-on-responses-to-heating-in-two-lizard-species-sampled-along-an-elevational-gradient
#4
P Mason DuBois, Tanner K Shea, Natalie M Claunch, Emily N Taylor
Thermal tolerance is an important variable in predictive models about the effects of global climate change on species distributions, yet the physiological mechanisms responsible for reduced performance at high temperatures in air-breathing vertebrates are not clear. We conducted an experiment to examine how oxygen affects three variables exhibited by ectotherms as they heat-gaping threshold, panting threshold, and loss of righting response (the latter indicating the critical thermal maximum)-in two lizard species along an elevational (and therefore environmental oxygen partial pressure) gradient...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28797476/temperature-effects-on-aerobic-scope-and-cardiac-performance-of-european-perch-perca-fluviatilis
#5
Denise Lyager Jensen, Johannes Overgaard, Tobias Wang, Hans Gesser, Hans Malte
Several recent studies have highlighted how impaired cardiac performance at high temperatures and in hypoxia may compromise the capacity for oxygen transport. Thus, at high temperatures impaired cardiac capacity is proposed to reduce oxygen transport to a degree that lowers aerobic scope and compromises thermal tolerance (the oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis). To investigate this hypothesis, we measured aerobic and cardiac performance of a eurythermal freshwater teleost, the European perch (Perca fluviatilis)...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28797475/long-term-hypoxia-exposure-alters-the-cardiorespiratory-physiology-of-steelhead-trout-oncorhynchus-mykiss-but-does-not-affect-their-upper-thermal-tolerance
#6
Roman Motyka, Tommy Norin, Lene H Petersen, Duane B Huggett, A Kurt Gamperl
It has been suggested that exposure to high temperature or hypoxia may confer tolerance to the other oxygen-limited stressor (i.e., 'cross-tolerance'). Thus, we investigated if chronic hypoxia-acclimation (>3 months at 40% air saturation) improved the steelhead trout's critical thermal maximum (CTMax), or affected key physiological variables that could impact upper thermal tolerance. Neither CTMax (24.7 vs. 25.3°C) itself, nor oxygen consumption ( [Formula: see text] ), haematocrit, blood haemoglobin concentration, or heart rate differed between hypoxia- and normoxia-acclimated trout when acutely warmed...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28797474/an-introduction-to-the-special-issue-ocltt-a-universal-concept
#7
EDITORIAL
Timothy D Clark, Felix C Mark
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689727/temperature-stress-and-insect-immunity
#8
REVIEW
Iwona Wojda
This mini-review summarizes the recent knowledge concerning the role of temperature in the immune response of insects. The heat-shock is described as a common phenomenon in both homotherms and poikilotherms, and the role of heat-shock proteins in innate immunity is recalled taking into account its evolutionary aspects. Similar to homothermic animals, which show a febrile reaction to infection, poikilothermic invertebrates such as insects develop behavioural fever as part of their immune response. It can be elicited not only by the presence of the pathogen itself but also by injection of immune stimulators i...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689726/physical-mechanism-or-evolutionary-trade-off-factors-dictating-the-relationship-between-metabolic-rate-and-ambient-temperature-in-carabid-beetles
#9
Agnieszka Gudowska, Bartosz W Schramm, Marcin Czarnoleski, Jan Kozłowski, Ulf Bauchinger
The tight association between ambient temperature (T) and metabolic rate (MR) is a common occurrence in ectotherms, but the determinants of this association are not fully understood. This study examined whether the relationship between MR and T is the same among individuals, as predicted by the Universal Temperature Dependence hypothesis, or whether this relationship differs between them. We used flow-through respirometry to measure standard MR and to determine gas exchange patterns for 111 individuals of three Carabidae species which differ in size (Abax ovalis, Carabus linnei and C...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689725/phylogenetic-analysis-of-the-allometry-of-metabolic-rate-and-mitochondrial-basal-proton-leak
#10
Elias T Polymeropoulos, R Oelkrug, C R White, M Jastroch
The mitochondrial basal proton leak (MBPL) significantly contributes to high body temperatures (Tb) and basal metabolic rates (BMR) in endotherms. In endotherms at a given body mass (M), liver MBPL is higher than in ectotherms, supporting the notion that MBPL may partly explain the evolutionary increase in metabolic rate (MR), fostering endothermy. Here, we re-addressed this assumption by performing a phylogenetic analysis comparing all available liver MBPL data for ecto- and endotherms. While MBPL within endotherms negatively scales with M and BMR as shown previously, MBPL of ectotherms does not scale allometrically with M...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689724/thermal-biology-in-two-syntopic-lizards-phymaturus-extrilidus-and-liolaemus-parvus-in-the-puna-region-of-argentina
#11
Rodrigo Gómez Alés, Juan Carlos Acosta, Alejandro Laspiur
Body temperature is the most important ecophysiological variable affecting reptiles' life history. Moreover, thermoregulation in ectotherms implies a struggle to reach preferred temperatures in natural conditions due to the influence of biotic and abiotic factors. Our objective was to evaluate and compare the thermal biology of two syntopic species, Phymaturus extrilidus and Liolaemus parvus, in the Puna region of San Juan, Argentina. We determined body temperature (Tb), micro-environmental temperatures (Ta and Ts) and operative temperatures (Te) in the field...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689723/methods-and-pitfalls-of-measuring-thermal-preference-and-tolerance-in-lizards
#12
REVIEW
Agustín Camacho, Travis W Rusch
Understanding methodological and biological sources of bias during the measurement of thermal parameters is essential for the advancement of thermal biology. For more than a century, studies on lizards have deepened our understanding of thermal ecophysiology, employing multiple methods to measure thermal preferences and tolerances. We reviewed 129 articles concerned with measuring preferred body temperature (PBT), voluntary thermal tolerance, and critical temperatures of lizards to offer: a) an overview of the methods used to measure and report these parameters, b) a summary of the methodological and biological factors affecting thermal preference and tolerance, c) recommendations to avoid identified pitfalls, and d) directions for continued progress in our application and understanding of these thermal parameters...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689722/genetic-components-in-a-thermal-developmental-plasticity-of-the-beetle-tribolium-castaneum
#13
Marcin Czarnoleski, Paulina Kramarz, Dariusz Małek, Szymon M Drobniak
Low developmental temperatures cause ectotherms to retard growth, postpone maturation, and emerge at either larger or smaller adult size. In this study, we explored how these thermal responses evolved, focusing on their genetic basis. We applied a full diallel breeding design on inbred lines of the flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. To assess the proportional contributions of genetic and non-genetic effects, each genotype, a unique combination of parental haplotypes, was reared from an egg to imago at five developmental temperatures...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689721/studying-the-evolutionary-significance-of-thermal-adaptation-in-ectotherms-the-diversification-of-amphibians-energetics
#14
Roberto F Nespolo, Julio Figueroa, Jaiber J Solano-Iguaran
A fundamental problem in evolutionary biology is the understanding of the factors that promote or constrain adaptive evolution, and assessing the role of natural selection in this process. Here, comparative phylogenetics, that is, using phylogenetic information and traits to infer evolutionary processes has been a major paradigm . In this study, we discuss Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models (OU) in the context of thermal adaptation in ectotherms. We specifically applied this approach to study amphibians's evolution and energy metabolism...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689720/thermal-acclimation-in-american-alligators-effects-of-temperature-regime-on-growth-rate-mitochondrial-function-and-membrane-composition
#15
Edwin R Price, Tushar S Sirsat, Sarah K G Sirsat, Gurdeep Kang, Jantana Keereetaweep, Mina Aziz, Kent D Chapman, Edward M Dzialowski
We investigated the ability of juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) to acclimate to temperature with respect to growth rate. We hypothesized that alligators would acclimate to cold temperature by increasing the metabolic capacity of skeletal muscles and the heart. Additionally, we hypothesized that lipid membranes in the thigh muscle and liver would respond to low temperature, either to maintain fluidity (via increased unsaturation) or to maintain enzyme reaction rates (via increased docosahexaenoic acid)...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689719/the-thermal-environment-of-the-nest-affects-body-and-cell-size-in-the-solitary-red-mason-bee-osmia-bicornis-l
#16
Justyna Kierat, Hajnalka Szentgyörgyi, Marcin Czarnoleski, Michał Woyciechowski
Many ectotherms grow larger at lower temperatures than at higher temperatures. This pattern, known as the temperature-size rule, is often accompanied by plastic changes in cell size, which can mechanistically explain the thermal dependence of body size. However, the theory predicts that thermal plasticity in cell size has adaptive value for ectotherms because there are different optimal cell-membrane-to-cell-volume ratios at different temperatures. At high temperatures, the demand for oxygen is high; therefore, a large membrane surface of small cells is beneficial because it allows high rates of oxygen transport into the cell...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689718/long-term-and-acute-effects-of-temperature-and-oxygen-on-metabolism-food-intake-growth-and-heat-tolerance-in-a-freshwater-gastropod
#17
K Natan Hoefnagel, Wilco C E P Verberk
Temperature affects the physiology and life-history of ectothermic animals, often increasing metabolic rate and decreasing body size. Oxygen limitation has been put forward as a mechanism to explain thermal responses of body size and the ability to survive stress. However the time-scales involved in growth performance and heat tolerance differ radically. In order to increase our understanding of oxygen and temperature effects on body size and heat tolerance and the time scale involved, we reared Lymnaea stagnalis under six combinations of temperature and oxygen tension from hatching up to an age of 300 days and recorded shell length during this whole period...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689717/compensation-of-thermal-constraints-along-a-natural-environmental-gradient-in-a-malagasy-iguanid-lizard-oplurus-quadrimaculatus
#18
Ole Theisinger, W Berg, K H Dausmann
Physiological or behavioural adjustments are a prerequisite for ectotherms to cope with different thermal environments. One of the world's steepest environmental gradients in temperature and precipitation can be found in southeastern Madagascar. This unique gradient allowed us to study the compensation of thermal constraints in the heliothermic lizard Oplurus quadrimaculatus on a very small geographic scale. The lizard occurs from hot spiny forest to intermediate gallery and transitional forest to cooler rain forest and we investigated whether these habitat differences are compensated behaviourally or physiologically...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689716/exploring-physiological-plasticity-and-local-thermal-adaptation-in-an-intertidal-crab-along-a-latitudinal-cline
#19
Juan Diego Gaitán-Espitia, Leonardo D Bacigalupe, Tania Opitz, Nelson A Lagos, Sebastián Osores, Marco A Lardies
Intertidal organisms have evolved physiological mechanisms that enable them to maintain performance and survive during periods of severe environmental stress with temperatures close to their tolerance limits. The level of these adaptive responses in thermal physiology can vary among populations of broadly distributed species depending on their particular environmental context and genetic backgrounds. Here we examined thermal performances and reaction norms for metabolic rate (MR) and heart rate (HR) of seven populations of the porcelanid crab Petrolisthes violaceus from markedly different thermal environments across the latitudinal gradient of ~3000km...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689715/exploration-of-low-temperature-microrna-function-in-an-anoxia-tolerant-vertebrate-ectotherm-the-red-eared-slider-turtle-trachemys-scripta-elegans
#20
Kyle K Biggar, Kenneth B Storey
As a model for vertebrate long-term survival in oxygen-restricted environments, the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans) can adapt at the biochemical level to survive in oxygen-free (anoxic) cold water (<10°C). This impressive ability is enabled through a coordinated suppression of energy-expensive, non-essential, cell processes. This study explored the anoxia-responsive expression of several microRNA species (miR-1a, -133, -17, -107, -148a, -21, -103, -210, -20a, -365 and -29b) in adult turtles exposed to 5h and 20h anoxia (at 5±1°C)...
August 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
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