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Biochemical Society Transactions

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913687/do-we-know-whether-potential-g-quadruplexes-actually-form-in-long-functional-rna-molecules
#1
REVIEW
Carika Weldon, Ian C Eperon, Cyril Dominguez
The roles of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) G-quadruplex structures in gene expression and telomere maintenance have been well characterized. Recent results suggest that such structures could also play pivotal roles in ribonucleic acid (RNA) biology, such as splicing or translation regulation. However, it has been difficult to show that RNA G-quadruplexes (G4s) exist in specific long RNA sequences, such as precursor messenger RNA, in a functional or cellular context. Most current methods for identifying G4s involve the use of short, purified RNA sequences in vitro, in the absence of competition with secondary structures or protein binding...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913686/micrognathia-in-mouse-models-of-ciliopathies
#2
REVIEW
Hadeel Adel Al-Lami, William B Barrell, Karen J Liu
Defects in the development of the mandible can lead to micrognathia, or small jaw, which manifests in ciliopathic conditions, such as orofaciodigital syndrome, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, and Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Although micrognathia occurs frequently in human and mouse ciliopathies, it has been difficult to pinpoint the underlying cellular causes. In this mini-review, we shed light on the tissue-specific contributions to ciliary dysfunction in the development of the mandible. First, we outline the steps involved in setting up the jaw primordium and subsequent steps in the outgrowth of the mandibular skeleton...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913685/novel-biomarkers-in-kidney-disease-roles-for-cilia-wnt-signalling-and-atmin-in-polycystic-kidney-disease
#3
REVIEW
Paraskevi Goggolidou, Patricia D Wilson
Biomarkers, the measurable indicators of biological conditions, are fast becoming a popular approach in providing information to track disease processes that could lead to novel therapeutic interventions for chronic conditions. Inherited, chronic kidney disease affects millions of people worldwide and although pharmacological treatments exist for some conditions, there are still patients whose only option is kidney dialysis and kidney transplantation. In the past 10 years, certain chronic kidney diseases have been reclassified as ciliopathies...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913684/transporter-oligomerization-form-and-function
#4
REVIEW
Yilmaz Alguel, Alexander D Cameron, George Diallinas, Bernadette Byrne
Transporters are integral membrane proteins with central roles in the efficient movement of molecules across biological membranes. Many transporters exist as oligomers in the membrane. Depending on the individual transport protein, oligomerization can have roles in membrane trafficking, function, regulation and turnover. For example, our recent studies on UapA, a nucleobase ascorbate transporter, from Aspergillus nidulans, have revealed both that dimerization of this protein is essential for correct trafficking to the membrane and the structural basis of how one UapA protomer can affect the function of the closely associated adjacent protomer...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913683/mitochondrial-fission-and-fusion
#5
REVIEW
Hakjoo Lee, Yisang Yoon
Mitochondrial fission and fusion have been recognized as critical processes in the health of mitochondria and cells. Two decades of studies have generated a great deal of information about mitochondrial fission and fusion; however, still much needs to be understood for the basic molecular mechanisms of these important cellular processes. The core protein factors for mitochondrial fission and fusion are dynamin proteins that possess membrane-remodeling properties. This short review covers a recent development and understanding of the mechanisms by which these mechanochemical enzymes mediate mitochondrial fission and fusion...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913682/translational-regulation-of-mitochondrial-biogenesis
#6
REVIEW
Yi Zhang, Hong Xu
Mitochondria are generated by the expression of genes on both nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Mitochondrial biogenesis is highly plastic in response to cellular energy demand, developmental signals and environmental stimuli. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway regulates mitochondrial biogenesis to co-ordinate energy homeostasis with cell growth. The local translation of mitochondrial proteins on the outer membrane facilitates their efficient import and thereby allows prodigious mitochondrial biogenesis during rapid cell growth and proliferation...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913681/the-borg-family-of-cdc42-effector-proteins-cdc42ep1-5
#7
REVIEW
Aaron J Farrugia, Fernando Calvo
Despite being discovered more than 15 years ago, the Borg (binder of Rho GTPases) family of Cdc42 effector proteins (Cdc42EP1-5) remains largely uncharacterised and relatively little is known about their structure, regulation and role in development and disease. Recent studies are starting to unravel some of the key functional and mechanistic aspects of the Borg proteins, including their role in cytoskeletal remodelling and signalling. In addition, the participation of Borg proteins in important cellular processes such as cell shape, directed migration and differentiation is slowly emerging, directly linking Borgs with important physiological and pathological processes such as angiogenesis, neurotransmission and cancer-associated desmoplasia...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913680/new-nuclear-and-perinuclear-functions-of-formins
#8
REVIEW
Tadamoto Isogai, Metello Innocenti
Formin family proteins (formins) represent an evolutionary conserved protein family encoded in the genome of a wide range of eukaryotes. Formins are hallmarked by a formin homology 1 (FH1) domain juxtaposed to an FH2 domain whereby they control actin and microtubule dynamics. Not surprisingly, formins are best known as key regulators of the cytoskeleton in a variety of morphogenetic processes. However, mounting evidence implicates several formins in the assembly and organization of actin within and around the nucleus...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913679/modelling-gtpase-dynamics-to-understand-rhoa-driven-cancer-cell-invasion
#9
REVIEW
Joseph H R Hetmanski, Jean-Marc Schwartz, Patrick T Caswell
Metastasis, initially driven by cells migrating and invading through the local environment, leads to most cancer-associated deaths. Cells can use a variety of modes to move in vitro, all of which depend on Rho GTPases at some level. While traditionally it was thought that Rac1 activity drives protrusive lamellipodia at the leading edge of a polarised cell while RhoA drives rear retraction, more recent work in 3D microenvironments has revealed a much more complicated picture of GTPase dynamics. In particular, RhoA activity can dominate the leading edge polymerisation of actin to form filopodial actin-spike protrusions that drive more invasive cell migration...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913678/regulation-of-protein-phosphatase-2a-pp2a-tumor-suppressor-function-by-pme-1
#10
REVIEW
Amanpreet Kaur, Jukka Westermarck
Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays a major role in maintaining cellular signaling homeostasis by dephosphorylation of a variety of signaling proteins and acts as a tumor suppressor. Protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) negatively regulates PP2A activity by highly complex mechanisms that are reviewed here. Importantly, recent studies have shown that PME-1 promotes oncogenic MAPK/ERK and AKT pathway activities in various cancer types. In human glioma, high PME-1 expression correlates with tumor progression and kinase inhibitor resistance...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913677/phlpping-through-history-a-decade-in-the-life-of-phlpp-phosphatases
#11
REVIEW
Agnieszka T Grzechnik, Alexandra C Newton
In the decade since their discovery, the PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatases (PHLPP) have emerged as critical regulators of cellular homeostasis, and their dysregulation is associated with various pathophysiologies, ranging from cancer to degenerative diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease. The two PHLPP isozymes, PHLPP1 and PHLPP2, were identified in a search for phosphatases that dephosphorylate Akt, and thus suppress growth factor signaling. However, given that there are over 200‚ÄČ000 phosphorylated residues in a single cell, and fewer than 50 Ser/Thr protein phosphatases, it is not surprising that PHLPP has many other cellular functions yet to be discovered, including a recently identified role in regulating the epigenome...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913676/translational-control-by-mtor-independent-routes-how-eif6-organizes-metabolism
#12
REVIEW
Annarita Miluzio, Sara Ricciardi, Nicola Manfrini, Roberta Alfieri, Stefania Oliveto, Daniela Brina, Stefano Biffo
Over the past few years, there has been a growing interest in the interconnection between translation and metabolism. Important oncogenic pathways, like those elicited by c-Myc transcription factor and mTOR kinase, couple the activation of the translational machinery with glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis. Eukaryotic initiation factor 6 (eIF6) is a factor necessary for 60S ribosome maturation. eIF6 acts also as a cytoplasmic translation initiation factor, downstream of growth factor stimulation. eIF6 is up-regulated in several tumor types...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913675/motility-and-adhesion-through-type-iv-pili-in-gram-positive-bacteria
#13
REVIEW
Kurt H Piepenbrink, Eric J Sundberg
Type IV pili are hair-like bacterial surface appendages that play a role in diverse processes such as cellular adhesion, colonization, twitching motility, biofilm formation, and horizontal gene transfer. These extracellular fibers are composed exclusively or primarily of many copies of one or more pilin proteins, tightly packed in a helix so that the highly hydrophobic amino-terminus of the pilin is buried in the pilus core. Type IV pili have been characterized extensively in Gram-negative bacteria, and recent advances in high-throughput genomic sequencing have revealed that they are also widespread in Gram-positive bacteria...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913674/immunoglobulins-and-their-receptors-and-subversion-of-their-protective-roles-by-bacterial-pathogens
#14
REVIEW
Jenny M Woof
Immunoglobulins (Igs) play critical roles in immune defence against infectious disease. They elicit potent elimination processes such as triggering complement activation and engaging specific Fc receptors present on immune cells, resulting in phagocytosis and other killing mechanisms. Many important pathogens have evolved mechanisms to subvert or evade Ig-mediated defence. One such mechanism used by several pathogenic bacteria features proteins that bind the Ig Fc region and compromise engagement of host effector molecules...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913673/structural-insights-into-functional-amyloid-inhibition-in-gram-ve-bacteria
#15
REVIEW
William Hawthorne, Sarah Rouse, Lee Sewell, Stephen J Matthews
Amyloids are proteinaceous aggregates known for their role in debilitating degenerative diseases involving protein dysfunction. Many forms of functional amyloid are also produced in nature and often these systems require careful control of their assembly to avoid the potentially toxic effects. The best-characterised functional amyloid system is the bacterial curli system. Three natural inhibitors of bacterial curli amyloid have been identified and recently characterised structurally. Here, we compare common structural features of CsgC, CsgE and CsgH and discuss the potential implications for general inhibition of amyloid...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913672/first-model-of-dimeric-lrrk2-the-challenge-of-unrevealing-the-structure-of-a-multidomain-parkinson-s-associated-protein
#16
REVIEW
Giambattista Guaitoli, Bernd K Gilsbach, Francesco Raimondi, Christian Johannes Gloeckner
Mutations within the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene represent the most common cause of Mendelian forms of Parkinson's disease, among autosomal dominant cases. Its gene product, LRRK2, is a large multidomain protein that belongs to the Roco protein family exhibiting GTPase and kinase activity, with the latter activity increased by pathogenic mutations. To allow rational drug design against LRRK2 and to understand the cross-regulation of the G- and the kinase domain at a molecular level, it is key to solve the three-dimensional structure of the protein...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913671/l-rrk-de-triomphe-a-solution-for-lrrk2-gtpase-activity
#17
REVIEW
Jonathon Nixon-Abell, Daniel C Berwick, Kirsten Harvey
Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a central protein in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), yet its normal function has proved stubbornly hard to elucidate. Even though it remains unclear how pathogenic mutations affect LRRK2 to cause PD, recent findings provide increasing cause for optimism. We summarise here the developing consensus over the effect of pathogenic mutations in the Ras of complex proteins and C-terminal of Roc domains on LRRK2 GTPase activity. This body of work has been greatly reinforced by our own study of the protective R1398H variant contained within the LRRK2 GTPase domain...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913670/screening-for-chemical-modulators-for-lrrk2
#18
REVIEW
Heather Mortiboys
After the discovery of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) as a risk factor for sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) and mutations in LRRK2 as a cause of some forms of familial PD, there has been substantial interest in finding chemical modulators of LRRK2 function. Most of the pathogenic mutations in LRRK2 are within the enzymatic cores of the protein; therefore, many screens have focused on finding chemical modulators of this enzymatic activity. There are alternative screening approaches that could be taken to investigate compounds that modulate LRRK2 cellular functions...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913669/the-unconventional-g-protein-cycle-of-lrrk2-and-roco-proteins
#19
REVIEW
Susanne Terheyden, Laura M Nederveen-Schippers, Arjan Kortholt
Mutations in the human leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most frequent cause of hereditary Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 belongs to the Roco family of proteins, which are characterized by the presence of a Ras of complex proteins domain (Roc), a C-terminal of Roc domain (COR) and a kinase domain. Despite intensive research, much remains unknown about activity and the effect of PD-associated mutations. Recent biochemical and structural studies suggest that LRRK2 and Roco proteins are noncanonical G-proteins that do not depend on guanine nucleotide exchange factors or GTPase-activating proteins for activation...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913668/cellular-functions-of-lrrk2-implicate-vesicular-trafficking-pathways-in-parkinson-s-disease
#20
REVIEW
Mark R Cookson
Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene, associated with Parkinson's disease, have been shown to affect intracellular trafficking pathways in a variety of cells and organisms. An emerging theme is that LRRK2 can bind to multiple membranous structures in cells, and several recent studies have suggested that the Rab family of small GTPases might be important in controlling the recruitment of LRRK2 to specific cellular compartments. Once localized to membranes, LRRK2 then influences downstream events, evidenced by changes in the autophagy-lysosome pathway...
December 15, 2016: Biochemical Society Transactions
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