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Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

Nicole R Giuliani, Junaid S Merchant, Danielle Cosme, Elliot T Berkman
Recently, there has been an increase in the number of human neuroimaging studies seeking to predict behavior above and beyond traditional measurements such as self-report. This trend has been particularly notable in the area of food consumption, as the percentage of people categorized as overweight or obese continues to rise. In this review, we argue that there is considerable utility in this form of health neuroscience, modeling the neural bases of eating behavior and dietary change in healthy community populations...
March 15, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Viktor Müller, Johanna Sänger, Ulman Lindenberger
When playing music in an ensemble, musicians need to precisely coordinate their actions with one another. As shown in our previous studies on guitar duets, interbrain synchronization plays an essential role during such interactions. In this study, we simultaneously recorded electroencephalograms from four guitarists during quartet playing, to explore the extent and the functional significance of synchronized cortical activity across four brains. We found that hyperbrain networks based on intra- and interbrain connectivity across four brains dwell on higher frequencies for intrabrain communication and on lower frequencies for interbrain connections...
March 15, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Vera Leo, Aleksi J Sihvonen, Tanja Linnavalli, Mari Tervaniemi, Matti Laine, Seppo Soinila, Teppo Särkämö
Coupling novel verbal material with a musical melody can potentially aid in its learning and recall in healthy subjects, but this has never been systematically studied in stroke patients with cognitive deficits. In a counterbalanced design, we presented novel verbal material (short narrative stories) in both spoken and sung formats to stroke patients at the acute poststroke stage and 6 months poststroke. The task comprised three learning trials and a delayed recall trial. Memory performance on the spoken and sung tasks did not differ at the acute stage, whereas sung stories were learned and recalled significantly better compared with spoken stories at the 6 months poststroke stage...
March 15, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Lison Fanuel, Sophie Portrat, Barbara Tillmann, Gaën Plancher
Recent evidence suggests that working memory (WM) performance can be enhanced in the presence of an isochronous rhythm during the retention interval because it improves refreshing. Considering the cognitive load (CL) effect as an indicator of refreshing, the present study investigated whether an isochronous rhythm might benefit memory performance under varying cognitive load. For that goal, the presence of a regular rhythm and the cognitive load of the concurrent task (i.e., reading of digits that were either same or different within a trial) were systematically varied...
March 15, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Yoav Kessler
Removal has been suggested to play a key role in controlling the contents of working memory. The present study examined the aftereffects of removal in a working memory updating task. Participants performed the reference-back paradigm, a version of the n-back task that is composed of two trial types: reference trials that required working memory updating and comparison trials that did not require updating. N-2 repetition effects-the difference in performance between trials that presented the same stimulus as the one presented two trials before (ABA sequences) and trials in which the stimulus differed from the two previous stimuli (ABC sequences)-were examined...
March 15, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Ayako Uchinaka, Yuri Kawashima, Yuki Sano, Shogo Ito, Yusuke Sano, Kai Nagasawa, Natsumi Matsuura, Mamoru Yoneda, Yuichiro Yamada, Toyoaki Murohara, Kohzo Nagata
Melatonin regulates circadian rhythms but also has antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects that ameliorate metabolic disorders. We investigated the effects of the selective melatonin agonist ramelteon on cardiac and adipose tissue pathology in the DahlS.Z-Leprfa /Leprfa (DS/obese) rat, a model of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Rats were treated with a low (0.3 mg/kg per day) or high (8 mg/kg per day) dose of ramelteon from 9 to 13 weeks of age. Ramelteon treatment at either dose attenuated body weight gain, left ventricular fibrosis, and diastolic dysfunction, as well as cardiac oxidative stress and inflammation, without affecting hypertension or insulin resistance...
March 15, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Henkjan Honing
In recent years, music and musicality have been the focus of an increasing amount of research effort. This has led to a growing role and visibility of the contribution of (bio)musicology to the field of neuroscience and cognitive sciences at large. While it has been widely acknowledged that there are commonalities between speech, language, and musicality, several researchers explain this by considering musicality as an epiphenomenon of language. However, an alternative hypothesis is that musicality is an innate and widely shared capacity for music that can be seen as a natural, spontaneously developing set of traits based on and constrained by our cognitive abilities and their underlying biology...
March 15, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Valérie Camos, Matthew Johnson, Vanessa Loaiza, Sophie Portrat, Alessandra Souza, Evie Vergauwe
Working memory is one of the most important topics of research in cognitive psychology. The cognitive revolution that introduced the computer metaphor to describe human cognitive functioning called for this system in charge of the temporary storage of incoming or retrieved information to permit its processing. In the past decades, one particular mechanism of maintenance, attentional refreshing, has attracted an increasing amount of interest in the field of working memory. However, this mechanism remains rather mysterious, and its functioning is conceived in very different ways across the literature...
March 15, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Wei-En J Tseng, Siew-Na Lim, Lu-An Chen, Shuo-Bin Jou, Hsiang-Yao Hsieh, Mei-Yun Cheng, Chun-Wei Chang, Han-Tao Li, Hsing-I Chiang, Tony Wu
Whether the cognitive processing of music and speech relies on shared or distinct neuronal mechanisms remains unclear. Music and language processing in the brain are right and left temporal functions, respectively. We studied patients with musicogenic epilepsy (ME) that was specifically triggered by popular songs to analyze brain hyperexcitability triggered by specific stimuli. The study included two men and one woman (all right-handed, aged 35-55 years). The patients had sound-triggered left temporal ME in response to popular songs with vocals, but not to instrumental, classical, or nonvocal piano solo versions of the same song...
March 15, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Stefan Elmer, Lutz Jäncke
Numerous studies have documented the behavioral advantages conferred on professional musicians and children undergoing music training in processing speech sounds varying in the spectral and temporal dimensions. These beneficial effects have previously often been associated with local functional and structural changes in the auditory cortex (AC). However, this perspective is oversimplified, in that it does not take into account the intrinsic organization of the human brain, namely, neural networks and oscillatory dynamics...
March 15, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Klaus Oberauer
To function properly, working memory must be rapidly updated. Updating requires the removal of information no longer relevant. I present six experiments designed to explore the boundary conditions and the time course of removal. A condition in which three out of six memory items can be removed was compared to two baseline conditions in which either three or six items were encoded and maintained in working memory. The time for removal was varied. In experiment 1, in the removal condition, a distinct subset of three words was cued to be irrelevant after encoding all six words...
March 12, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Deniz Erturk-Hasdemir, Dennis L Kasper
Starting from birth, all animals develop a symbiotic relationship with their resident microorganisms that benefits both the microbe and the host. Recent advances in technology have substantially improved our ability to direct research toward the identification of important microbial species that affect host physiology. The identification of specific commensal molecules from these microbes and their mechanisms of action is still in its early stages. Polysaccharide A (PSA) of Bacteroides fragilis is the archetypical example of a commensal molecule that can modulate the host immune system in health and disease...
March 12, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Martin Beniston
This paper reports on the influence that extreme values in the tails of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) Index probability density function (PDF) can exert on temperatures in Europe. When the NAO Index enters into its lowest (10% quantile or less) and highest (90% quantile or higher) modes, European temperatures often exhibit large negative or positive departures from their mean values, respectively. Analyses of the joint quantiles of the Index and temperatures (i.e., the simultaneous exceedance of particular quantile thresholds by the two variables) show that temperatures enter into the upper or lower tails of their PDF when the NAO Index also enters into its extreme tails, more often that could be expected from random statistics...
March 10, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Renée C Firman
Males and females rarely have identical evolutionary interests over reproduction, and when the fitness of both sexes is dependent upon paternity outcomes, sexual conflict over fertilization is inevitable. In internal fertilizers, the female tract is a formidable selective force on the number and integrity of sperm that reach the egg. Selection on sperm quality is intensified when females mate multiply and rival males are forced to compete for fertilizations. While male adaptations to sperm competition have been well documented (e...
March 10, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Graham J Hitch, Yanmei Hu, Richard J Allen, Alan D Baddeley
Previous research on memory for a short sequence of visual stimuli indicates that access to the focus of attention (FoA) can be achieved in either of two ways. The first is automatic and is indexed by the recency effect, the enhanced retention of the final item. The second is strategic and based on instructions to prioritize items differentially, a process that draws on executive capacity and boosts retention of information deemed important. In both cases, the increased level of retention can be selectively reduced by presenting a poststimulus distractor (or suffix)...
March 10, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Clément Belletier, Valérie Camos
Recent studies suggest that social presence undermines performance in difficult tasks because the presence of others would automatically capture the attention needed to achieve these tasks. Here, we tested whether this attentional capture (caused by the experimenter presence) affects working memory. Several models suggest that maintenance in working memory relies on an attentional mechanism. Besides this mechanism, another nonattentional verbal rehearsal could also maintain verbal information. In experiment 1, we varied the presence of the experimenter while participants had to memorize letters during a short retention interval...
March 10, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Shinichi Furuya, Yuta Furukawa, Kazumasa Uehara, Takanori Oku
An integration of afferent sensory information from the visual, auditory, and proprioceptive systems into execution and update of motor programs plays crucial roles in control and acquisition of skillful sequential movements in musical performance. However, conventional behavioral and neurophysiological techniques that have been applied to study simplistic motor behaviors limit elucidating online sensorimotor integration processes underlying skillful musical performance. Here, we propose two novel techniques that were developed to investigate the roles of auditory and proprioceptive feedback in piano performance...
March 10, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
María Carmen Sánchez-González, Verónica Pérez-Cabezas, Inmaculada López-Izquierdo, Estanislao Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Carmen Ruiz-Molinero, Manuel Rebollo-Salas, José Jesús Jiménez-Rejano
The aim of this study was to establish whether there is a relationship between conditions of accommodative visual dysfunctions and cervical complaints. Fifty-two participants were included. Variables were accommodative amplitude, positive and negative relative accommodation (NRA), accommodative response, and accommodative facility. Subjects were classified as accommodative insufficiency, accommodative excess, or normal. Neck complaints were measured with the Neck Disability Index, the Visual Analogue Scale, and by cervical range of motion, deep flexor muscle activation score, and performance index...
March 10, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Masayo Fujita, Soichiro Ide, Kazutaka Ikeda
A common notion is that essentially all addictive drugs, including opioids, activate dopaminergic pathways in the brain reward system, and the inappropriate use of such drugs induces drug dependence. However, an opioid reward response is reportedly still observed in several models of dopamine depletion, including in animals that are treated with dopamine blockers, animals that are subjected to dopaminergic neuron lesions, and dopamine-deficient mice. The intracranial self-stimulation response is enhanced by stimulants but reduced by morphine...
March 7, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Laura K Cirelli, Sandra E Trehub, Laurel J Trainor
Infants typically experience music through social interactions with others. One such experience involves caregivers singing to infants while holding and bouncing them rhythmically. These highly social interactions shape infant music perception and may also influence social cognition and behavior. Moving in time with others-interpersonal synchrony-can direct infants' social preferences and prosocial behavior. Infants also show social preferences and selective prosociality toward singers of familiar, socially learned melodies...
March 7, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
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