journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30125060/crime-and-hypnosis-in-fin-de-si%C3%A3-cle-germany-the-czynski-case
#1
Heather Wolffram
Lurid tales of the criminal use of hypnosis captured both popular and scholarly attention across Europe during the closing decades of the nineteenth century, culminating not only in the invention of fictional characters such as du Maurier's Svengali but also in heated debates between physicians over the possibilities of hypnotic crime and the application of hypnosis for forensic purposes. The scholarly literature and expert advice that emerged on this topic at the turn of the century highlighted the transnational nature of research into hypnosis and the struggle of physicians in a large number of countries to prise hypnotism from the hands of showmen and amateurs once and for all...
June 20, 2017: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30125059/a-dangerous-method-the-german-discourse-on-hypnotic-suggestion-therapy-around-1900
#2
Andreas-Holger Maehle
In the late nineteenth century, German-speaking physicians and psychiatrists intensely debated the benefits and risks of treatment by hypnotic suggestion. While practitioners of the method sought to provide convincing evidence for its therapeutic efficacy in many medical conditions, especially nervous disorders, critics pointed to dangerous side effects, including the triggering of hysterical attacks or deterioration of nervous symptoms. Other critics claimed that patients merely simulated hypnotic phenomena in order to appease their therapist...
June 20, 2017: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30125058/from-transnational-to-regional-magnetic-fevers-the-making-of-a-law-on-hypnotism-in-late-nineteenth-century-belgium
#3
Kaat Wils
In May 1892, Belgium adopted a law on the exercise of hypnotism. The signing of the law constituted a temporary endpoint to six years of debate on the dangers and promises of hypnotism, a process of negotiation between medical doctors, members of parliament, legal professionals and lay practitioners. The terms of the debate were not very different from what happened elsewhere in Europe, where, since the mid 1880s, hypnotism had become an object of public concern. The Belgian law was nevertheless unique in its combined effort to regulate the use of hypnosis in public and private, for purposes of entertainment, research and therapy...
June 20, 2017: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30125057/between-charcot-and-bernheim-the-debate-on-hypnotism-in-fin-de-si%C3%A3-cle-italy
#4
Maria Teresa Brancaccio
In the late 1870s, a small group of Italian psychiatrists became interested in hypnotism in the wake of the studies conducted by the French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot. Eager to engage in hypnotic research, these physicians referred to the scientific authority of French and German scientists in order to overcome the scepticism of the Italian medical community and establish hypnotism as a research subject based on Charcot's neuropathological model. In the following years, French studies on hypnotism continued to exert a strong influence in Italy...
June 20, 2017: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30125056/hypnosis-lessons-by-stage-magnetizers-medical-and-lay-hypnotists-in-spain
#5
Andrea Graus
During the late nineteenth century, Spanish physicians had few chances to observe how hypnosis worked within a clinical context. However, they had abundant opportunities to watch lay hypnotizers in action during private demonstrations or on stage. Drawing on the exemplary cases of the magnetizers Alberto Santini Sgaluppi (a.k.a. Alberto Das) and Onofroff, in this paper I discuss the positive influence of stage magnetizers on medical hypnosis in Spain. I argue that, owing to the absence of medical training in hypnosis, the stage magnetizers’ demonstrations became practical hypnosis lessons for many physicians willing to learn from them instead of condemning them...
June 20, 2017: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30125055/%C3%A2-a-portion-of-truth%C3%A2-demarcating-the-boundaries-of-scientific-hypnotism-in-late-nineteenth-century-france
#6
Kim M Hajek
In fin-de-siècle France, hypnotism enjoyed an unprecedented level of medico-scientific legitimacy. Researchers studying hypnotism had nonetheless to manage relations between their new ‘science’ and its widely denigrated precursor, magnétisme animal, because too great a resemblance between the two could damage the reputation of ‘scientific’ hypnotism. They did so by engaging in the rhetorical activity of boundary-work. This paper analyses such demarcation strategies in major texts from the Salpêtrière and Nancy Schools – the rival groupings that dominated enquiry into hypnotism in the 1880s...
June 20, 2017: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30125054/history-of-hypnotism-in-europe-and-the-significance-of-place
#7
EDITORIAL
Andreas-Holger Maehle, Heather Wolffram
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 20, 2017: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30124281/the-%C3%A2-pay-to-publish%C3%A2-model-should-be-abolished
#8
Raghavendra Gadagkar
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 20, 2016: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30124279/engaging-civil-society-with-health-research
#9
Mary Madden
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 20, 2016: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30124277/the-future-of-scientific-periodicals-a-librarian-s-perspective
#10
Stella Butler
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 20, 2016: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30124274/the-disruptive-potential-of-data-publication
#11
Sabina Leonelli
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 20, 2016: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30124272/how-has-publishing-changed-in-the-last-twenty-years
#12
Sunetra Gupta
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 20, 2016: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30124270/science-publishing-2035
#13
Rebekah Higgitt
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 20, 2016: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30124269/rescaling-scientific-communication
#14
Mark Patterson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 20, 2016: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30124267/%C3%AF-communities-need-journals
#15
Cameron Neylon
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 20, 2016: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30124264/%C3%AF-distrust-and-expertise-can-scientific-journals-continue-as-gatekeepers
#16
Vanessa Heggie
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 20, 2016: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30124259/making-public-ahead-of-print-meetings-and-publications-at-the-royal-society-1752-1892
#17
Aileen Fyfe, Noah Moxham
This essay examines the interplay between the meetings and publications of learned scientific societies during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, when journals were an established but not yet dominant form of scholarly communication. The ‘making public’ of research at meetings, long before actual ‘publication’ in society periodicals, enabled a complex of more or less formal sites of communication and discussion ahead of print. Using two case studies from the Royal Society of London—Jan Ingen-Housz in 1782 and John Tyndall in 1857 to 1858—we reveal how different individuals navigated and exploited the power structures, social activities and seasonal rhythms of learned societies, all necessary precursors to gaining admission to the editorial processes of society journals, and trace the shifting significance of meetings in the increasingly competitive and diverse realm of Victorian scientific publishing...
December 20, 2016: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30124255/popularizers-participation-and-the-transformations-of-nineteenth-century-publishing-from-the-1860s-to-the-1880s
#18
Bernard Lightman
Focusing on the editors, journalists and authors who worked on the new ‘popular science’ periodicals and books from the 1860s to the 1880s, this piece will discuss how they conceived of their readers as co-participants in the creation of knowledge. The transformation of nineteenth-century publishing opened up opportunities for making science more accessible to a new polity of middle and working class readers. Editors, journalists and authors responded to the communications revolution, and the larger developments that accompanied it, by defining the exemplary scientist in opposition to the emerging conception of the professional scientist, by rejecting the notion that the laboratory was the sole legitimate site of scientific discovery and by experimenting with new ways of communicating scientific knowledge to their audience...
December 20, 2016: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30124253/what-do-you-mean-by-a-periodical-forms-and-functions
#19
Pietro Corsi
The word ‘periodical’ immediately calls to mind huge stacks of bound volumes neatly arranged on library shelves. Yet, in historical terms, it would be hard to claim that ‘periodical’ is a word endowed with a definite and univocal connotation. Even the criterion of ‘periodicity’ leaves a lot out of account. Forms historically assumed by periodicals often envisaged regular schedules of appearance, but this was often more of a wish than a reality. Thus, great care needs to be taken in accepting at face value the dating of issues and volumes...
December 20, 2016: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30124251/the-scientific-the-literary-and-the-popular-commerce-and-the-reimagining-of-the-scientific-journal-in-britain-1813%C3%A2-1825
#20
Jonathan R Topham
As scientists question the recent dominance of the scientific journal, the varied richness of its past offers useful materials for reflection. This paper examines four innovative journals founded and run by leading publishers and men of science in the 1810s and 1820s, which contributed to a significant reimagining of the form. Relying on a new distinction between the ‘literary’ and the ‘scientific’ to define their market, those who produced the journals intended to maximize their readership and profits by making them to some extent ‘popular’...
December 20, 2016: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
journal
journal
26090
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"