journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29769371/how-are-we-currently-training-and-maintaining-clinical-readiness-of-us-and-uk-military-surgeons-responsible-for-managing-head-face-and-neck-wounds-on-deployment
#1
John Breeze, J G Combes, J DuBose, D B Powers
INTRODUCTION: The conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan provided military surgeons from the USA and the UK with extensive experience into the management of injuries to the head, face and neck (HFN) from high energy bullets and explosive weaponry. The challenge is now to maintain the expertise in managing such injuries for future military deployments. METHODS: The manner in which each country approaches four parameters required for a surgeon to competently treat HFN wounds in deployed military environments was compared...
May 16, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29769370/improving-survivability-from-blast-injury-shifting-the-goalposts-and-the-need-for-interdisciplinary-research
#2
EDITORIAL
A Phill Pearce, Jon Clasper
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 16, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29769369/comparison-of-severe-trauma-treatment-standards-in-civilian-china-with-current-practice-in-the-chinese-military-peacekeeping-level-2-military-hospital-in-gao-mali
#3
Jian Li, J Tian, Y B Wang, H Zhang
INTRODUCTION: The People's Republic of China has been successfully deploying medical teams to support the peacekeeping mission at the Level 2 Military Hospital in Mali since December 2013. The aim of this paper was to compare the current practice in Chinese Peacekeeping Level 2 Military Hospital with the severe trauma treatment standards reported in China. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted between 26 April 2014 and 18 May 2016 using records stored in the Chinese Peacekeeping Level 2 Hospital (CHN L2)...
May 16, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29769368/the-reconstructive-trauma-surgery-interface-fellowship-and-its-applicability-to-military-and-civilian-trainees
#4
EDITORIAL
Douglas Hammond, J Breeze, D Evriviades
The Reconstructive Trauma Surgery Fellowship is a based at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, and focuses on the multidisciplinary management of major trauma from presentation to discharge. It is unique to the UK in that it provides both management and leadership experience as well as operative surgical skills particularly in terms of reconstruction on complex trauma patients including those from the military. This paper describes the relevance of fellowships in modern surgical training, composition of the reconstructive trauma fellowship and the relevance for both civilian and military trainees...
May 16, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29769367/similarities-between-military-and-medical-service-stigma-of-seeking-mental-health-assistance
#5
EDITORIAL
Fergus Gardiner, E C Gardiner
Studies have identified that there are many barriers to treatment of mental health illnesses in military populations, including the negative-associated stigma. One such barrier includes perceptions of weakness, leading to concerns about leadership and competency and being seen as malingering. Furthermore, similarities can be seen in civilian health professionals, where concerns of negative perceptions can limit reporting and treatment of mental health illnesses. Despite the frequency of stressful events, military and health professionals do not become immune to stress and are often ill prepared to cope with acute stressors that can often build on each other until emotional exhaustion and/or crisis point...
May 16, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29764915/remote-physiological-monitoring-in-an-austere-environment-a-future-for-battlefield-care-provision
#6
Matthew J Smyth, J A Round, A J Mellor
Wearable technologies are making considerable advances into the mainstream as they become smaller and more user friendly. The global market for such devices is forecasted to be worth over US$5 billion in 2018, with one in six people owning a device. Many professional sporting teams use self-monitoring to assess physiological parameters and work rate on the pitch, highlighting the potential utility for military command chains. As size of device reduces and sensitivity improves, coupled with remote connectivity technology, integration into the military environment could be relatively seamless...
May 14, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29735488/military-health-outreach-on-exercise-askari-serpent-a-discussion-of-clinical-and-ethical-challenges
#7
EDITORIAL
Luke John Turner, D Wilkins, J I J A Woodhouse
Exercise ASKARI SERPENT (Ex AS) is an annual British Army medical exercise that sees the deployment of a medical regiment to rural Kenya. The exercise involves the delivery of health outreach clinics and health education to the civilian population alongside Kenyan governmental and non-governmental organisations. This article includes a post hoc analysis of the ethical and clinical challenges that clinicians faced during Ex AS, applying a four-quadrant approach to ethical decision-making. This article intends to stimulate further debate and discussion on how to best prepare clinicians for clinical challenges and ethical decision-making on future exercises and operations...
May 7, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29735487/guidelines-for-reproducing-blast-exposures-in-the-laboratory
#8
Tyson Josey, S Ouellet, D Bieler, I Cernak, A Franke, R Gupta, E Kirkman, M J Leggieri, H Orru, M Philippens, M Risling, J C Sarron, S Skriudalen, J A Teland, S Watts, S Bjarnason
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 7, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29735486/dispatches-from-the-editor-what-do-authors-want-from-our-military-health-journal
#9
Johno Breeze, C E J Langford
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 7, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29705736/one-man-s-wars
#10
EDITORIAL
S Jagdish, M J Roberts
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 28, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29691307/effects-of-anterior-compartment-fasciotomy-on-intramuscular-compartment-pressure-in-patients-with-chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome
#11
David Roscoe, A J Roberts, D Hulse, A F Shaheen, M P Hughes, A N Bennet
BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) have pain during exercise that usually subsides at rest. Diagnosis is usually confirmed by measurement of intramuscular compartment pressure (IMCP) following exclusion of other possible causes. Management usually requires fasciotomy but reported outcomes vary widely. There is little evidence of the effectiveness of fasciotomy on IMCP. Testing is rarely repeated postoperatively and reported follow-up is poor. Improved diagnostic criteria based on preselection and IMCP levels during dynamic exercise testing have recently been reported...
April 24, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29691306/blood-salvage-technology-after-combat-injury
#12
EDITORIAL
Mohamed Sahloul, D Bowley, E Kirkman, H Doughty
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 24, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29680818/fatal-head-and-neck-injuries-in-military-underbody-blast-casualties
#13
Sarah K Stewart, A P Pearce, Jon C Clasper
INTRODUCTION: Death as a consequence of underbody blast (UBB) can most commonly be attributed to central nervous system injury. UBB may be considered a form of tertiary blast injury but is at a higher rate and somewhat more predictable than injury caused by more classical forms of tertiary injury. Recent studies have focused on the transmission of axial load through the cervical spine with clinically relevant injury caused by resultant compression and flexion. This paper seeks to clarify the pattern of head and neck injuries in fatal UBB incidents using a pragmatic anatomical classification...
April 21, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29666201/guidelines-for-conducting-epidemiological-studies-of-blast-injury
#14
Dan Bieler, I Cernak, L Martineau, S Bjarnason, A Franke, E Kirkman, M J Leggieri, H Orru, S Ouellet, M Philippens, M G Risling, J-C Sarron, S Skriudalen, J A Teland, S Watts, R Gupta
Blast injuries are often caused by more than one mechanism, do not occur in isolation, and typically elicit a secondary multi-system response. Research efforts often do not separate blast injuries caused by blast waves from those caused by blunt force trauma and other mechanisms. 15 experts from nine different NATO nations developed in the HFM Research Task Group (RTG; HFM-234 (RTG)) 'Environmental Toxicology of Blast Exposures: Injury Metrics, Modelling, Methods and Standards' Guidelines for Conducting Epidemiological Studies of Blast Injury...
April 17, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29666200/knowing-when-not-to-stop-rejecting-futility-in-ebola-virus-disease-treatment
#15
EDITORIAL
Michael Jacobs
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 17, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29666199/does-magnesium-sulfate-have-a-role-in-the-management-of-severe-traumatic-brain-injury-in-civilian-and-military-populations-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#16
REVIEW
Marc W H Lyons, W J Blackshaw
INTRODUCTION: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of combat morbidity. Currently, the medical management of TBI is limited to supportive critical care. Magnesium sulfate has been studied as a potentially beneficial therapeutic agent. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis was undertaken, examining the role of magnesium in the management of severe TBI in adults. The primary outcome of the study was all-cause mortality, with secondary outcomes of Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) and GCS...
April 17, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29653938/lessons-identified-from-the-2017-manchester-and-london-terrorism-incidents-part-1-introduction-and-the-prehospital-phase
#17
REVIEW
Paul Hunt
This is the first article in a three-part series detailing the lessons identified during the NHS England clinical debrief meetings which followed the response to the 2017 Manchester and London terrorist incidents. It covers the prehospital phase including the overall key learning points, timeline information, scene challenges, resource utilisation, triage, distribution and helicopter emergency medical service feedback.
April 13, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29653937/unusual-case-of-suspected-recurrent-scarlet-fever-in-a-uk-serviceman
#18
Rachel Phillips, A J Martin-Bates, R Withnall
The UK prevalence of scarlet fever, a Group A streptococcal infection, is increasing. We present an unusual case of suspected recurrent scarlet fever in a member of the UK Armed Forces. Treatments, occupational implication and public health measures to mitigate the risk of disease spread.
April 13, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29643122/guidelines-for-using-animal-models-in-blast-injury-research
#19
Sarah Watts, E Kirkman, D Bieler, S Bjarnason, A Franke, R Gupta, M J Leggieri, H Orru, S Ouellet, M Philippens, J-C Sarron, S Skriudalen, J A Teland, M Risling, I Cernak
Blast injury is a very complex phenomenon and frequently results in multiple injuries. One method to investigate the consequences of blast injuries is with the use of living systems (animal models). The use of animals allows the examination and evaluation of injury mechanisms in a more controlled manner, allowing variables such as primary or secondary blast injury for example, to be isolated and manipulated as required. To ensure a degree of standardisation across the blast research community a set of guidelines which helps researchers navigate challenges of modelling blast injuries in animals is required...
April 10, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29643121/fast-in-the-deployed-military-setting
#20
Nicholas James Carter, D Gay
INTRODUCTION: Focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST) is historically an effective method of assessing the patient in the trauma bay in order to aid decision-making and optimise patient outcomes. However, in the UK civilian practice, the use of FAST may decline given a recent change in National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance as a result of improvement in CT availability and resuscitation techniques. METHOD: In the Role 3 Medical Treatment Facility, Camp Bastion, 187 patients with trauma who received FAST in the trauma bay in 2014 were reviewed to determine the accuracy of FAST in the deployed environment...
April 10, 2018: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
journal
journal
26062
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"