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Journal of Chemical Ecology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28918590/the-role-of-diet-in-shaping-the-chemical-signal-design-of-lacertid-lizards
#1
Simon Baeckens, Roberto García-Roa, José Martín, Raoul Van Damme
Lizards communicate with others via chemical signals, the composition of which may vary among species. Although the selective pressures and constraints affecting chemical signal diversity at the species level remain poorly understood, the possible role of diet has been largely neglected. The chemical signals of many lizards originate from the femoral glands that exude a mixture of semiochemicals, and may be used in a variety of contexts. We analyzed the lipophilic fraction of the glandular secretions of 45 species of lacertid lizard species by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry...
September 16, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28918495/the-stingless-bee-melipona-solani-deposits-a-signature-mixture-and-methyl-oleate-to-mark-valuable-food-sources
#2
David Alavez-Rosas, Edi A Malo, Miguel A Guzmán, Daniel Sánchez-Guillén, Rogel Villanueva-Gutiérrez, Leopoldo Cruz-López
Stingless bees foraging for food improve recruitment by depositing chemical cues on valuable food sites or pheromone marks on vegetation. Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and bioassays, we showed that Melipona solani foragers leave a mixture composed mostly of long chain hydrocarbons from their abdominal cuticle plus methyl oleate from the labial gland as a scent mark on rich food sites. The composition of hydrocarbons was highly variable among individuals and varied in proportions, depending on the body part...
September 16, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28894979/cuticular-hydrocarbons-of-tribolium-confusum-larvae-mediate-trail-following-and-host-recognition-in-the-ectoparasitoid-holepyris-sylvanidis
#3
Benjamin Fürstenau, Monika Hilker
Parasitic wasps which attack insects infesting processed stored food need to locate their hosts hidden inside these products. Their host search is well-known to be guided by host kairomones, perceived via olfaction or contact. Among contact kairomones, host cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) may provide reliable information for a parasitoid. However, the chemistry of CHC profiles of hosts living in processed stored food products is largely unknown. Here we showed that the ectoparasitoid Holepyris sylvanidis uses CHCs of its host Tribolium confusum, a worldwide stored product pest, as kairomones for host location and recognition at short range...
September 11, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28861807/oral-secretions-affect-hipvs-induced-by-generalist-mythimna-loreyi-and-specialist-parnara-guttata-herbivores-in-rice
#4
Islam S Sobhy, Atsushi Miyake, Tomonori Shinya, Ivan Galis
Plants synthesize variable mixtures of herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) as part of their evolutionary conserved defense. To elucidate the impact of chewing herbivores with different level of adaptation on HIPV profiles in rice, we measured HIPVs released from rice seedlings challenged by either the generalist herbivore Mythimna loreyi (MYL) or the specialist Parnara guttata (PAG). Both herbivores markedly elicited the emission of HIPVs, mainly on the second and third days after attack compared to control plants...
August 31, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28852942/sublethal-effects-of-neonicotinoid-insecticide-on-calling-behavior-and-pheromone-production-of-tortricid-moths
#5
Miguel A Navarro-Roldán, César Gemeno
In moths, sexual behavior combines female sex pheromone production and calling behavior. The normal functioning of these periodic events requires an intact nervous system. Neurotoxic insecticide residues in the agroecosystem could impact the normal functioning of pheromone communication through alteration of the nervous system. In this study we assess whether sublethal concentrations of the neonicotinoid insecticide thiacloprid, that competitively modulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the dendrite, affect pheromone production and calling behavior in adults of three economically important tortricid moth pests; Cydia pomonella (L...
August 29, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28852911/compositional-changes-in-foliage-phenolics-with-plant-age-a-natural-experiment-in-boreal-forests
#6
Hilde Karine Wam, Caroline Stolter, Line Nybakken
The composition of plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) extensively impacts ecosystem functioning. It is vital that we understand temporal patterns in the plants' allocation of resources to PSMs, particularly those influenced by human activity. Existing data are insufficient in the long-term perspective of perennial plants (age or ontogeny). We analysed phenolic concentrations in foliage from birch (Betula pubescens Ehr.) considered to be undamaged and growing on 5, 10 and 15 years old clear-cuts in two boreal forest landscapes in Norway, sampled at the peak of the growing season...
August 29, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28842787/what-are-the-mechanisms-behind-a-parasite-induced-decline-in-nestmate-recognition-in-ants
#7
Sara Beros, Susanne Foitzik, Florian Menzel
Social insects have developed sophisticated recognition skills to defend their nests against intruders. They do this by aggressively discriminating against non-nestmates with deviant cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) signatures. Studying nestmate recognition can be challenging as individual insects do not only vary in their discriminatory abilities, but also in their motivation to behave aggressively. To disentangle the influence of signaling and behavioral motivation on nestmate recognition, we investigated the ant Temnothorax nylanderi, where the presence of tapeworm-infected nestmates leads to reduced nestmate recognition among uninfected workers...
August 25, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28836040/two-gut-associated-yeasts-in-a-tephritid-fruit-fly-have-contrasting-effects-on-adult-attraction-and-larval-survival
#8
Alexander M Piper, Kevin Farnier, Tomas Linder, Robert Speight, John Paul Cunningham
Yeast-insect interactions have been well characterized in drosophilid flies, but not in tephritid fruit flies, which include many highly polyphagous pest species that attack ripening fruits. Using the Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni) as our model tephritid species, we identified yeast species present in the gut of wild-collected larvae and found two genera, Hanseniaspora and Pichia, were the dominant isolates. In behavioural trials using adult female B. tryoni, a fruit-agar substrate inoculated with Pichia kluyveri resulted in odour emissions that increased the attraction of flies, whereas inoculation with Hanseniaspora uvarum, produced odours that strongly deterred flies, and both yeasts led to decreased oviposition...
August 23, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28823100/-1s-3r-cis-chrysanthemyl-tiglate-sex-pheromone-of-the-striped-mealybug-ferrisia-virgata
#9
Jun Tabata, Ryoko T Ichiki
Derivatives of 2,2-dimethyl-3-(2-methylprop-1-enyl)cyclopropanecarboxylic acid (chrysanthemic acid) are classic natural pyrethroids discovered in pyrethrum plants and show insecticidal activity. Chrysanthemic acid, with two asymmetric carbons, has four possible stereoisomers, and most natural pyrethroids have the (1R,3R)-trans configuration. Interestingly, chrysanthemic acid-related structures are also found in insect sex pheromones; carboxylic esters of (1R,3R)-trans-(2,2-dimethyl-3-(2-methylprop-1-enyl)cyclopropyl)methanol (chrysanthemyl alcohol) have been reported from two mealybug species...
August 19, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28823016/de-novo-synthesis-of-linoleic-acid-in-multiple-collembola-species
#10
Miriama Malcicka, Joachim Ruther, Jacintha Ellers
Many ecological interactions in communities take place between consumers and the organisms they feed on. Continuous surplus of specific nutritional compounds in the diet may lead to evolutionary changes in the metabolic capacity of the consumer, leaving the biosynthesis of such compounds prone to genetic decay and render organisms auxotrophic. A nutrient that is essential to many organisms is the unsaturated fatty acid, linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6), which is important in the maintenance of cell membrane fluidity and as a precursor for signaling molecules...
August 19, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812177/host-plant-species-differentiation-in-a-polyphagous-moth-olfaction-is-enough
#11
Lucie Conchou, Peter Anderson, Göran Birgersson
Polyphagous herbivorous insects need to discriminate suitable from unsuitable host plants in complex plant communities. While studies on the olfactory system of monophagous herbivores have revealed close adaptations to their host plant's characteristic volatiles, such adaptive fine-tuning is not possible when a large diversity of plants is suitable. Instead, the available literature on polyphagous herbivore preferences suggests a higher level of plasticity, and a bias towards previously experienced plant species...
August 15, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28808822/is-prey-specificity-constrained-by-geography-semiochemically-mediated-oviposition-in-rhizophagus-grandis-coleoptera-monotomidae-with-its-specific-prey-dendroctonus-micans-coleoptera-curculionidae-scolytinae-and-with-exotic-dendroctonus-species
#12
Loïc Dohet, Jean-Claude Grégoire
Examples of totally specific predators are rare, and the mechanisms underlying this specificity are often poorly understood. In Eurasia, the Monotomid beetle Rhizophagus grandis is found only in the galleries of its prey, the bark beetle Dendroctonus micans. The specificity of R. grandis relies on kairomones which female predators use to adjust their oviposition to the number of prey larvae available in a gallery. Yet these chemical signals are still largely unknown. The North American D. punctatus and D. valens, which are not sympatric with R...
August 14, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28791540/the-scent-chemistry-of-heliconius-wing-androconia
#13
Florian Mann, Sohini Vanjari, Neil Rosser, Sandra Mann, Kanchon K Dasmahapatra, Chris Corbin, Mauricio Linares, Carolina Pardo-Diaz, Camilo Salazar, Chris Jiggins, Stefan Schulz
Neotropical Heliconius butterflies are members of various mimicry rings characterized by diverse colour patterns. In the present study we investigated whether a similar diversity is observed in the chemistry of volatile compounds present in male wing androconia. Recent research has shown that these androconia are used during courting of females. Three to five wild-caught male Heliconius individuals of 17 species and subspecies were analyzed by GC/MS. Most of the identified compounds originate from common fatty acids precursors, including aldehydes, alcohols, acetates or esters preferentially with a C18 and C20 chain, together with some alkanes...
August 8, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28780719/the-rare-north-american-cerambycid-beetle-dryobius-sexnotatus-shares-a-novel-pyrrole-pheromone-component-with-species-in-asia-and-south-america
#14
Natalie M Diesel, Yunfan Zou, Todd D Johnson, Donald A Diesel, Jocelyn G Millar, Judith A Mongold-Diers, Lawrence M Hanks
The compound 1-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1,2-propanedione ("pyrrole") is an important pheromone component of several Asian and South American species of longhorned beetles in the subfamily Cerambycinae. Here, we report the first confirmed identification of this compound as a pheromone component of a cerambycine species native to North America, the rare beetle Dryobius sexnotatus Linsley. Headspace volatiles from males contained (R)-3-hydroxyhexan-2-one and pyrrole (ratio 1:0.13), neither of which were detected in samples from a female...
August 5, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28770501/unsaturated-cuticular-hydrocarbons-enhance-responses-to-sex-pheromone-in-spruce-budworm-choristoneura-fumiferana
#15
P J Silk, E Eveleigh, L Roscoe, K Burgess, S Weatherby, G Leclair, P Mayo, M Brophy
The primary sex pheromone components of the female spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clem.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), are (E)- and (Z)-11-tetradecenal, produced in 95:5 ratio. However, male flight responses to calling females in a wind tunnel were faster and maintained longer than responses to any synthetic aldehyde blend. Analyses of cuticular extracts from spruce budworm adults revealed series of n-alkanes and n-monoalkenes with predominantly odd numbers of carbon atoms from C23- C29 in both sexes...
August 2, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28762003/chemical-heterogeneity-in-inbred-european-population-of-the-invasive-hornet-vespa-velutina-nigrithorax
#16
J Gévar, A-G Bagnères, J-P Christidès, E Darrouzet
Invasive social insect populations that have been introduced to a new environment through a limited number of introduction events generally exhibit reduced variability in their chemical signatures (cuticular hydrocarbons) compared to native populations of the same species. The reduced variability in these major recognition cues could be caused by a reduction of genetic diversity due to a genetic bottleneck. This hypothesis was tested in an inbred European population of the invasive hornet Vespa velutina nigrithorax...
July 31, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28752407/variation-in-the-volatile-profiles-of-black-and-manchurian-ash-in-relation-to-emerald-ash-borer-oviposition-preferences
#17
Chad M Rigsby, Nathaniel B McCartney, Daniel A Herms, James H Tumlinson, Don Cipollini
Emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis) is a devastating pest of ash (Fraxinus spp.) in its invaded range in North America. Its coevolved Asian hosts are more resistant and less preferred for oviposition than susceptible North American species. We compared EAB oviposition preferences and bark and canopy volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions of resistant Manchurian ash and susceptible black ash, and examined relationships between VOC profiles and oviposition. In the field, black ash was highly preferred for oviposition while no eggs were laid on Manchurian ash, and we found clear differences in the VOC profiles of Manchurian and black ash...
July 27, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28744733/arthropods-associate-with-their-red-wood-ant-host-without-matching-nestmate-recognition-cues
#18
Thomas Parmentier, Wouter Dekoninck, Tom Wenseleers
Social insect colonies provide a valuable resource that attracts and offers shelter to a large community of arthropods. Previous research has suggested that many specialist parasites of social insects chemically mimic their host in order to evade aggression. In the present study, we carry out a systematic study to test how common such chemical deception is across a group of 22 arthropods that are associated with red wood ants (Formica rufa group). In contrast to the examples of chemical mimicry documented in some highly specialized parasites in previous studies, we find that most of the rather unspecialized red wood ant associates surveyed did not use mimicry of the cuticular hydrocarbon recognition cues to evade host detection...
July 26, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28744732/medicago-truncatula-oleanolic-derived-saponins-are-correlated-with-caterpillar-deterrence
#19
Fanping Cai, Bonnie S Watson, David Meek, David V Huhman, Daniel J Wherritt, Cecile Ben, Laurent Gentzbittel, Brian T Driscoll, Lloyd W Sumner, Jacqueline C Bede
Plant resistance mechanisms to insect herbivory can potentially be bred into crops as an important strategy for integrated pest management. Medicago truncatula ecotypes inoculated with the rhizobium Ensifer medicae (Sinorhizobium medica) WSM419 were screened for resistance to herbivory by caterpillars of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, through leaf and whole plant choice studies; TN1.11 and F83005.5 are identified as the least and most deterrent ecotypes, respectively. In response to caterpillar herbivory, both ecotypes mount a robust burst of plant defensive jasmonate phytohormones...
July 25, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28744731/plant-community-chemical-composition-influences-trembling-aspen-populus-tremuloides-intake-by-sheep
#20
Kristen Y Heroy, Samuel B St Clair, Elizabeth A Burritt, Juan J Villalba
Nutrients and plant secondary compounds in aspen (Populus tremuloides) may interact with nutrients in the surrounding vegetation to influence aspen use by herbivores. Thus, this study aimed to determine aspen intake and preference by sheep in response to supplementary nutrients or plant secondary compounds (PSC) present in aspen trees. Thirty-two lambs were randomly assigned to one of four molasses-based supplementary feeds to a basal diet of tall fescue hay (N = 8) during three experiments. The supplements were as follows: (1) high-protein (60% canola meal), (2) a PSC (6% quebracho tannins), (3) 25% aspen bark, and (4) control (100% molasses)...
July 25, 2017: Journal of Chemical Ecology
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