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Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28191987/it-s-out-of-my-hands-grasping-capacity-may-not-influence-perceived-object-size
#1
Elizabeth S Collier, Rebecca Lawson
Linkenauger, Witt, and Proffitt (2011) found that the perceived size of graspable objects was scaled by perceived grasping capacity. However, it is possible that this effect occurred because object size was estimated on the same trial as grasping capacity. This may have led to a conflation of estimates of perceived action capacity and spatial properties. In 5 experiments, we tested Linkenauger et al.'s claim that right-handed observers overestimate the grasping capacity of their right hand relative to their left hand, and that this, in turn, leads them to underestimate the size of objects to-be-grasped in their right hand relative to their left hand...
February 13, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182481/multisensory-cue-combination-after-sensory-loss-audio-visual-localization-in-patients-with-progressive-retinal-disease
#2
Sara E Garcia, Pete R Jones, Eleanor I Reeve, Michel Michaelides, Gary S Rubin, Marko Nardini
Human adults can combine perceptual estimates from different senses to minimize uncertainty, by taking a reliability-weighted average (the maximum likelihood estimate, MLE). Although research has shown that healthy human adults reweight estimates as their reliability changes from one trial to the next, less is known about how humans adapt to gradual long-term changes in sensory reliability. This study assessed whether individuals diagnosed with progressive visual deterioration, due to retinal disease, combined auditory and visual cues to location according to optimal (MLE) predictions...
February 9, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182480/are-portrait-artists-superior-face-recognizers-limited-impact-of-adult-experience-on-face-recognition-ability
#3
Jeremy J Tree, Ruth Horry, Howard Riley, Jeremy B Wilmer
Across 2 studies, the authors asked whether extensive experience in portrait art is associated with face recognition ability. In Study 1, 64 students completed a standardized face recognition test before and after completing a year-long art course that included substantial portraiture training. They found no evidence of an improvement in face recognition after training over and above what would be expected by practice alone. In Study 2, the authors investigated the possibility that more extensive experience might be needed for such advantages to emerge, by testing a cohort of expert portrait artists (N = 28), all of whom had many years of experience...
February 9, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182479/the-first-letter-position-effect-in-visual-word-recognition-the-role-of-spatial-attention
#4
Andrew J Aschenbrenner, David A Balota, Alexandra J Weigand, Michele Scaltritti, Derek Besner
A prominent question in visual word recognition is whether letters within a word are processed in parallel or in a left to right sequence. Although most contemporary models posit parallel processing, this notion seems at odds with well-established serial position effects in word identification that indicate preferential processing for the initial letter. The present study reports 4 experiments designed to further probe the locus of the first position processing advantage. The paradigm involved masked target words presented for short durations and required participants to subsequently select from 2 alternatives, 1 which was identical to the target and 1 that differed by a single letter...
February 9, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182478/haptic-search-for-movable-parts
#5
Myrthe A Plaisier, Krista E Overvliet
How do we know that we are touching 1 single object instead of 2 different ones? An important cue is movability: When different sources of input can move independently, it is likely that they belong to different objects or that the object consists of movable parts. We hypothesize that the haptic feature "movability" is used for making this differentiation and we expect movability to be detected efficiently. We investigated this hypothesis by using a haptic search task. In Experiment 1, participants were asked to press down on piano-like keys and respond whether 1 key was movable while the rest were static or the other way around (detection only)...
February 9, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182477/it-does-exist-a-left-to-right-spatial-numerical-association-of-response-codes-snarc-effect-among-native-hebrew-speakers
#6
Bar Zohar-Shai, Joseph Tzelgov, Avi Karni, Orly Rubinsten
Several studies, starting with Dehaene, Bossini, and Giraux (1993), have reported that, in parity-judgment tasks, the difference in response latencies generated by the right and left hand are negatively correlated with number magnitudes. This SNARC (spatial-numerical association of response codes) effect is in line with the notion that the "mental number line" extends from left to right. The SNARC effect has been found mainly in native speakers of Germanic/Romanic languages; it has been suggested that the SNARC effect may derive from the experience of reading from left to right...
February 9, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182476/evolving-the-keys-to-visual-crowding
#7
Erik Van der Burg, Christian N L Olivers, John Cass
Peripheral vision can be severely impaired by nearby clutter. Decades of research using sparse displays have established that this phenomenon, known as visual crowding, follows Bouma's rule: Interference occurs for target-distractor separations up to half the target's eccentricity. Although considered a fundamental constraint on human vision, it is unclear whether Bouma's rule holds in dense heterogeneous visual environments. Using a genetic algorithm we investigated crowding in densely cluttered displays. Participants were instructed to identify the orientation of a target line (6° eccentricity) among 284 distractor lines...
February 9, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28125254/is-that-a-human-categorization-dis-fluency-drives-evaluations-of-agents-ambiguous-on-human-likeness
#8
Evan W Carr, Galit Hofree, Kayla Sheldon, Ayse P Saygin, Piotr Winkielman
A fundamental and seemingly unbridgeable psychological boundary divides humans and nonhumans. Essentialism theories suggest that mixing these categories violates "natural kinds." Perceptual theories propose that such mixing creates incompatible cues. Most theories suggest that mixed agents, with both human and nonhuman features, obligatorily elicit discomfort. In contrast, we demonstrate top-down, cognitive control of these effects-such that the discomfort with mixed agents is partially driven by disfluent categorization of ambiguous features that are pertinent to the agent...
January 26, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095006/can-the-structure-of-motor-variability-predict-learning-rate
#9
David Barbado Murillo, Carla Caballero Sánchez, Janice Moreside, Francisco J Vera-García, Francisco J Moreno
Recent studies show that motor variability is actively regulated as an exploration tool to promote learning in reward-based tasks. However, its role in learning processes during error-based tasks, when a reduction of the motor variability is required to achieve good performance, is still unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that error-based learning not only depends on exploration but also on the individuals' ability to measure and predict the motor error. Previous studies identified a less auto-correlated motor variability as a higher ability to perform motion adjustments...
January 16, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095005/identifying-stimuli-that-cue-multiple-responses-triggers-the-congruency-sequence-effect-independent-of-response-conflict
#10
Daniel H Weissman, Katelyn M Colter, Lauren D Grant, Patrick G Bissett
According to most accounts of executive control, resisting distraction requires enhancing task-relevant processing, reducing task-irrelevant processing, or both. Consistent with this view, the congruency effect in Stroop-like tasks-a putative measure of distraction-is often smaller after highly distracting incongruent trials than after less distracting congruent trials. Competing accounts of executive control, however, differ on which aspect of an incongruent trial triggers this congruency sequence effect (CSE)...
January 16, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080115/reaching-into-response-selection-stimulus-and-response-similarity-influence-central-operations
#11
Tim Wifall, Aaron T Buss, Thomas A Farmer, John P Spencer, Eliot Hazeltine
To behave adaptively in complex and dynamic environments, one must link perception and action to satisfy internal states, a process known as response selection (RS). A largely unexplored topic in the study of RS is how interstimulus and interresponse similarity affect performance. To examine this issue, we manipulated stimulus similarity by using colors that were either similar or dissimilar and manipulated response similarity by having participants move a mouse cursor to locations that were either close together or far apart...
January 12, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080114/oculomotor-and-linguistic-processing-effects-in-reading-dynamic-horizontally-scrolling-text
#12
Hannah Harvey, Hayward J Godwin, Gemma Fitzsimmons, Simon P Liversedge, Robin Walker
Two experiments are reported investigating oculomotor behavior and linguistic processing when reading dynamic horizontally scrolling text (compared to reading normal static text). Three factors known to modulate processing time in normal reading were investigated: Word length and word frequency were examined in Experiment 1, and target word predictability in Experiment 2. An analysis of global oculomotor behavior across the 2 experiments showed that participants made fewer and longer fixations when reading scrolling text, with shorter progressive and regressive saccades between these fixations...
January 12, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080113/higher-order-cognitive-control-in-dual-tasks-evidence-from-task-pair-switching
#13
Patricia Hirsch, Sophie Nolden, Iring Koch
In the present study, we combined the psychological refractory period (PRP) paradigm with a novel task-pair switching logic which enabled us to isolate performance costs occurring at the global level of task-pairs. In Experiment 1, in which we used conceptually overlapping responses for Task 1 (T1) and Task 2 (T2), we generated 3 task-pairs by combining 1 of 3 visual tasks (T1) with an auditory task (T2). In addition to worse performance after a short SOA than a long SOA (i.e., PRP effect), we found impaired performance in n - 1 task-pair switches as compared to n - 1 task-pair repetitions (i...
January 12, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080112/beyond-trial-by-trial-adaptation-a-quantification-of-the-time-scale-of-cognitive-control
#14
Bart Aben, Tom Verguts, Eva Van den Bussche
The idea that adaptation to stimulus or response conflict can operate over different time scales takes a prominent position in various theories and models of cognitive control. The mechanisms underlying temporal variations in control are nevertheless poorly understood, which is partly due to a lack of appropriate empirical measures. Inspired by reinforcement learning models, we developed a method to quantify the time scale of control behaviorally, by computing trial-by-trial effects that go beyond the preceding trial...
January 12, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080111/generalized-movement-representation-in-haptic-perception
#15
Lucile Dupin, Vincent Hayward, Mark Wexler
The extraction of spatial information by touch often involves exploratory movements, with tactile and kinesthetic signals combined to construct a spatial haptic percept. However, the body has many tactile sensory surfaces that can move independently, giving rise to the source binding problem: when there are multiple tactile signals originating from sensory surfaces with multiple movements, are the tactile and kinesthetic signals bound to one another? We studied haptic signal combination by applying the tactile signal to a stationary fingertip while another body part (the other hand or a foot) or a visual target moves, and using a task that can only be done if the tactile and kinesthetic signals are combined...
January 12, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080110/spoken-words-can-make-the-invisible-visible-testing-the-involvement-of-low-level-visual-representations-in-spoken-word-processing
#16
Markus Ostarek, Falk Huettig
The notion that processing spoken (object) words involves activation of category-specific representations in visual cortex is a key prediction of modality-specific theories of representation that contrasts with theories assuming dedicated conceptual representational systems abstracted away from sensorimotor systems. In the present study, we investigated whether participants can detect otherwise invisible pictures of objects when they are presented with the corresponding spoken word shortly before the picture appears...
January 12, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080109/the-dynamic-range-of-response-set-activation-during-action-sequencing
#17
Lawrence P Behmer, Matthew J C Crump
We show that theories of response scheduling for sequential action can be discriminated on the basis of their predictions for the dynamic range of response set activation during sequencing, which refers to the momentary span of activation states for completed and to-be-completed actions in a response set. In particular, theories allow that future actions in a plan are partially activated, but differ with respect to the width of the range, which refers to the number of future actions that are partially activated...
January 12, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27918184/brain-responses-to-regular-and-octave-scrambled-melodies-a-case-of-predictive-coding
#18
Eitan Globerson, Roni Granot, Idan Tal, Yuval Harpaz, Maor Zeev-Wolf, Abraham Golstein
Melody recognition is an online process of evaluating incoming information and comparing this information to an existing internal corpus, thereby reducing prediction error. The predictive-coding model postulates top-down control on sensory processing accompanying reduction in prediction error. To investigate the relevancy of this model to melody processing, the current study examined early magnetoencephalogram (MEG) auditory responses to familiar and unfamiliar melodies in 25 participants. The familiar melodies followed and primed an octave-scrambled version of the same melody...
December 5, 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27893274/perceptual-adaptation-of-vowels-generalizes-across-the-phonology-and-does-not-require-local-context
#19
Kateřina Chládková, Václav Jonáš Podlipský, Anastasia Chionidou
Listeners usually understand without difficulty even speech that sounds atypical. When they encounter noncanonical realizations of speech sounds, listeners can make short-term adjustments of their long-term representations of those sounds. Previous research, focusing mostly on adaptation in consonants, has suggested that for perceptual adaptation to take place some local cues (lexical, phonotactic, or visual) have to guide listeners' interpretation of the atypical sounds. In the present experiment we investigated perceptual adaptation in vowels...
November 28, 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27893273/spontaneous-rereading-within-sentences-eye-movement-control-and-visual-sampling
#20
Sarah J White, Laura M T Lantz, Kevin B Paterson
Three experiments examine the role of previously read text in sentence comprehension and the control of eye movements during spontaneous rereading. Spontaneous rereading begins with a regressive saccade and involves reinspection of previously read text. All 3 experiments employed the gaze-contingent change technique to modulate the availability of previously read text. In Experiment 1, previously read text was permanently masked either immediately to the left of the fixated word (beyond wordn) or more than 1 word to the left (beyond wordn-1)...
November 28, 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
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