journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425733/contingent-capture-is-weakened-in-search-for-multiple-features-from-different-dimensions
#1
Dan Biderman, Natalie Biderman, Alon Zivony, Dominique Lamy
Can observers maintain more than 1 attentional set and search for 2 features in parallel? Previous studies that relied on attentional capture by irrelevant distractors to answer this question focused on features from the same dimension and specifically, on color. They showed that 2 separate color templates can guide attention selectively and simultaneously. Here, the authors investigated attentional guidance by 2 features from different dimensions. In three spatial-cueing experiments, they compared contingent capture during single-set versus dual-set search...
April 20, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425732/distractor-probability-changes-the-shape-of-the-attentional-template
#2
Joy J Geng, Nicholas E DiQuattro, Jonathan Helm
Theories of attention commonly refer to the "attentional template" as the collection of features in working memory that represent the target of visual search. Many models of attention assume that the template contains a veridical representation of target features, but recent studies have shown that the target representation is "shifted" away from distractor features in order to optimize their distinctiveness and facilitate visual search. Here, we manipulated the probability of target-similar distractors during a visual search task in 2 groups, and separately measured the contents of the attentional template...
April 20, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425731/changes-in-perception-action-tuning-over-long-time-scales-how-children-and-adults-perceive-and-act-on-dynamic-affordances-when-crossing-roads
#3
Elizabeth E O'Neal, Yuanyuan Jiang, Lucas J Franzen, Pooya Rahimian, Junghum Paul Yon, Joseph K Kearney, Jodie M Plumert
This investigation examined developmental change in how children perceive and act on dynamic affordances when crossing roads on foot. Six- to 14-year-olds and adults crossed roads with continuous cross-traffic in a large-screen, immersive pedestrian simulator. We observed change both in children's gap choices and in their ability to precisely synchronize their movement with the opening of a gap. Younger children were less discriminating than older children and adults, choosing fewer large gaps and more small gaps...
April 20, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28414501/spelling-ability-selectively-predicts-the-magnitude-of-disruption-in-unspaced-text-reading
#4
Aaron Veldre, Denis Drieghe, Sally Andrews
We examined the effect of individual differences in written language proficiency on unspaced text reading in a large sample of skilled adult readers who were assessed on reading comprehension and spelling ability. Participants' eye movements were recorded as they read sentences containing a low or high frequency target word, presented with standard interword spacing, or in one of three unsegmented text conditions that either preserved or eliminated word boundary information. The average data replicated previous studies: unspaced text reading was associated with increased fixation durations, a higher number of fixations, more regressions, reduced saccade length, and an inflation of the word frequency effect...
April 17, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28414500/location-coding-account-versus-affordance-activation-account-in-handle-to-hand-correspondence-effects-evidence-of-simon-like-effects-based-on-the-coding-of-action-direction
#5
Antonello Pellicano, Iring Koch, Ferdinand Binkofski
An increasing number of studies have shown a close link between perception and action, which is supposed to be responsible for the automatic activation of actions compatible with objects' properties, such as the orientation of their graspable parts. It has been observed that left and right hand responses to objects (e.g., cups) are faster and more accurate if the handle orientation corresponds to the response location than when it does not. Two alternative explanations have been proposed for this handle-to-hand correspondence effect: location coding and affordance activation...
April 17, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28414499/executive-and-perceptual-distraction-in-visual-working-memory
#6
Richard J Allen, Alan D Baddeley, Graham J Hitch
The contents of visual working memory are likely to reflect the influence of both executive control resources and information present in the environment. We investigated whether executive attention is critical in the ability to exclude unwanted stimuli by introducing concurrent potentially distracting irrelevant items to a visual working memory paradigm, and manipulating executive load using simple or more demanding secondary verbal tasks. Across 7 experiments varying in presentation format, timing, stimulus set, and distractor number, we observed clear disruptive effects of executive load and visual distraction, but relatively minimal evidence supporting an interactive relationship between these factors...
April 17, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28414498/neighing-barking-and-drumming-horses-object-related-sounds-help-and-hinder-picture-naming
#7
Andreas Mädebach, Stefan Wöhner, Marie-Luise Kieseler, Jörg D Jescheniak
The study presented here investigated how environmental sounds influence picture naming. In a series of four experiments participants named pictures (e.g., the picture of a horse) while hearing task-irrelevant sounds (e.g., neighing, barking, or drumming). Experiments 1 and 2 established two findings, facilitation from congruent sounds (e.g., picture: horse, sound: neighing) and interference from semantically related sounds (e.g., sound: barking), both relative to unrelated sounds (e.g., sound: drumming). Experiment 3 replicated the effects in a situation in which participants were not familiarized with the sounds prior to the experiment...
April 17, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406690/the-inversion-part-whole-and-composite-effects-reflect-distinct-perceptual-mechanisms-with-varied-relationships-to-face-recognition
#8
Constantin Rezlescu, Tirta Susilo, Jeremy B Wilmer, Alfonso Caramazza
Face recognition is thought to rely on specific mechanisms underlying a perceptual bias toward processing faces as undecomposable wholes. This face-specific "holistic processing" is commonly quantified using 3 measures: the inversion, part-whole, and composite effects. Consequently, many researchers assume that these 3 effects measure the same cognitive mechanism(s) and these mechanisms contribute to the wide range of individual differences seen in face recognition ability. We test these assumptions in a large sample (N = 282), with individual face recognition abilities measured by the well-validated Cambridge Face Perception Test...
April 13, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406689/caloric-primary-rewards-systematically-alter-time-perception
#9
Bowen J Fung, Carsten Murawski, Stefan Bode
Human time perception can be influenced by contextual factors, such as the presence of reward. Yet, the exact nature of the relationship between time perception and reward has not been conclusively characterized. We implemented a novel experimental paradigm to measure estimations of time across a range of suprasecond intervals, during the anticipation and after the consumption of fruit juice, a physiologically relevant primary reward. We show that average time estimations were systematically affected by the consumption of reward, but not by the anticipation of reward...
April 13, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406688/reading-sentences-of-uniform-word-length-evidence-for-the-adaptation-of-the-preferred-saccade-length-during-reading
#10
Michael G Cutter, Denis Drieghe, Simon P Liversedge
In the current study, the effect of removing word length variability within sentences on spatial aspects of eye movements during reading was investigated. Participants read sentences that were uniform in terms of word length, with each sentence consisting entirely of three-, four-, or five-letter words, or a combination of these word lengths. Several interesting findings emerged. Adaptation of the preferred saccade length occurred for sentences with different uniform word length; participants would be more accurate at making short saccades while reading uniform sentences of three-letter words, while they would be more accurate at making long saccades while reading uniform sentences of five-letter words...
April 13, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406687/investigating-the-relationship-between-media-multitasking-and-processes-involved-in-task-switching
#11
Reem Alzahabi, Mark W Becker, David Z Hambrick
Although multitasking with media has increased dramatically in recent years (Rideout, Foehr, & Roberts, 2010), the association between media multitasking and cognitive performance is poorly understood. In addition, the literature on the relationship between media multitasking and task-switching, one measure of cognitive control, has produced mixed results (Alzahabi & Becker, 2013; Minear et al., 2013; Ophir, Nass, & Wagner, 2009). Here we use an individual differences approach to investigate the relationship between media multitasking and task-switching performance by first examining the structure of task-switching and identifying the latent factors that contribute to switch costs...
April 13, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406686/cueing-cognitive-flexibility-item-specific-learning-of-switch-readiness
#12
Yu-Chin Chiu, Tobias Egner
The rich behavioral repertoire of the human species derives from our ability to flexibly reconfigure processing strategies (task sets) in response to changing requirements. This updating of task sets is effortful, as reflected by longer response times when switching a task than repeating it (switch costs). However, some recent data suggest that switch costs can be reduced by cueing switch readiness bottom-up, by associating particular stimuli with frequent switch requirements. This type of "stimulus-control (S-C) learning" would be highly adaptive, as it combines the speed of automatic (bottom-up) processing with the flexibility and generalizability of controlled (top-down) processing...
April 13, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406685/individual-differences-in-working-memory-capacity-predict-learned-control-over-attentional-capture
#13
Matthew K Robison, Nash Unsworth
Although individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC) typically predict susceptibility to attentional capture in various paradigms (e.g., Stroop, antisaccade, flankers), it sometimes fails to correlate with the magnitude of attentional capture effects in visual search (e.g., Stokes, 2016), which is 1 of the most frequently studied tasks to study capture (Theeuwes, 2010). But some studies have shown that search modes can mitigate the effects of attentional capture (Leber & Egeth, 2006). Therefore, the present study examined whether or not the relationship between WMC and attentional capture changes as a function of the search modes available...
April 13, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406684/redundant-encoding-strengthens-segmentation-and-grouping-in-visual-displays-of-data
#14
Christine Nothelfer, Michael Gleicher, Steven Franconeri
The availability and importance of data are accelerating, and our visual system is a critical tool for understanding it. The research field of data visualization seeks design guidelines-often inspired by perceptual psychology-for more efficient visual data analysis. We evaluated a common guideline: When presenting multiple sets of values to a viewer, those sets should be distinguished not just by a single feature, such as color, but redundantly by multiple features, such as color and shape. Despite the broad use of this practice across maps and graphs, it may carry costs, and there is no direct evidence for a benefit...
April 13, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406683/evaluating-the-sources-and-functions-of-gradiency-in-phoneme-categorization-an-individual-differences-approach
#15
Efthymia C Kapnoula, Matthew B Winn, Eun Jong Kong, Jan Edwards, Bob McMurray
During spoken language comprehension listeners transform continuous acoustic cues into categories (e.g., /b/ and /p/). While long-standing research suggests that phonetic categories are activated in a gradient way, there are also clear individual differences in that more gradient categorization has been linked to various communication impairments such as dyslexia and specific language impairments (Joanisse, Manis, Keating, & Seidenberg, 2000; López-Zamora, Luque, Álvarez, & Cobos, 2012; Serniclaes, Van Heghe, Mousty, Carré, & Sprenger-Charolles, 2004; Werker & Tees, 1987)...
April 13, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383966/enhancement-and-suppression-of-tactile-signals-during-reaching
#16
Dimitris Voudouris, Katja Fiehler
The perception of tactile stimuli presented on a moving hand is systematically suppressed. Such suppression has been attributed to the limited capacity of the brain to process task-irrelevant sensory information. Here, we examined whether humans do not only suppress movement-irrelevant but also enhance in parallel movement-relevant tactile signals when performing a goal-directed reaching movement. Participants reached to either a visual (LED) or somatosensory target (thumb or index finger of their unseen static hand) and discriminated 2 simultaneously presented tactile stimuli: a reference stimulus on the little finger of their static hand and a comparison stimulus on the index finger of their moving hand...
April 6, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383965/is-orthographic-information-from-multiple-parafoveal-words-processed-in-parallel-an-eye-tracking-study
#17
Michael G Cutter, Denis Drieghe, Simon P Liversedge
In the current study we investigated whether orthographic information available from 1 upcoming parafoveal word influences the processing of another parafoveal word. Across 2 experiments we used the boundary paradigm (Rayner, 1975) to present participants with an identity preview of the 2 words after the boundary (e.g., hot pan), a preview in which 2 letters were transposed between these words (e.g., hop tan), or a preview in which the same 2 letters were substituted (e.g., hob fan). We hypothesized that if these 2 words were processed in parallel in the parafovea then we may observe significant preview benefits for the condition in which the letters were transposed between words relative to the condition in which the letters were substituted...
April 6, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383964/adding-depth-to-overlapping-displays-can-improve-visual-search-performance
#18
Hayward J Godwin, Tamaryn Menneer, Simon P Liversedge, Kyle R Cave, Nick S Holliman, Nick Donnelly
Standard models of visual search have focused upon asking participants to search for a single target in displays where the objects do not overlap one another, and where the objects are presented on a single depth plane. This stands in contrast to many everyday visual searches wherein variations in overlap and depth are the norm, rather than the exception. Here, we addressed whether presenting overlapping objects on different depths planes to one another can improve search performance. Across 4 different experiments using different stimulus types (opaque polygons, transparent polygons, opaque real-world objects, and transparent X-ray images), we found that depth was primarily beneficial when the displays were transparent, and this benefit arose in terms of an increase in response accuracy...
April 6, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383963/on-the-origin-of-body-related-influences-on-visual-perception
#19
Wladimir Kirsch, Oliver Herbort, Benjamin Ullrich, Wilfried Kunde
The human body and the potential to move it affect the way we perceive the world. Here we explored a possible origin of such action-specific effects on perception. Participants were asked to enclose a virtual object by movements of their index finger and thumb and judged either the actual finger-thumb distance or the size of the virtual object subsequently. The visual-haptic discrepancy that comes with such virtual grasping resulted in a mutual impact of visual and body-related signals: the visual judgments of object's size were attracted by the felt finger posture and vice versa, judged finger distance was attracted by the size of the grasped object...
April 6, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383962/digit-color-synaesthesia-only-enhances-memory-for-colors-in-a-specific-context-a-new-method-of-duration-thresholds-to-measure-serial-recall
#20
A Lina Teichmann, Mark R Nieuwenstein, Anina N Rich
For digit-color synaesthetes, digits elicit vivid experiences of color that are highly consistent for each individual. The conscious experience of synaesthesia is typically unidirectional: Digits evoke colors but not vice versa. There is an ongoing debate about whether synaesthetes have a memory advantage over non-synaesthetes. One key question in this debate is whether synaesthetes have a general superiority or whether any benefit is specific to a certain type of material. Here, we focus on immediate serial recall and ask digit-color synaesthetes and controls to memorize digit and color sequences...
April 6, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
journal
journal
25704
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"