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Journal of Experimental Psychology. General

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29154619/complementarity-in-false-memory-illusions
#1
C J Brainerd, V F Reyna
For some years, the DRM illusion has been the most widely studied form of false memory. The consensus theoretical interpretation is that the illusion is a reality reversal, in which certain new words (critical distractors) are remembered as though they are old list words rather than as what they are-new words that are similar to old ones. This reality-reversal interpretation is supported by compelling lines of evidence, but prior experiments are limited by the fact that their memory tests only asked whether test items were old...
November 20, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29154618/atheist-horns-and-religious-halos-mental-representations-of-atheists-and-theists
#2
Jazmin L Brown-Iannuzzi, Stephanie McKee, Will M Gervais
Theists often receive the benefit of being stereotyped as trustworthy and moral, whereas atheists are viewed as untrustworthy and immoral. The extreme divergence between the stereotypes of theists and atheists suggests that mental images of the two groups may also diverge. We investigated whether people have biased mental images of theists and atheists. The results suggest that mental images of theists are associated with more positive attributes than images of atheists (Study 1), and these mental images influence who is believed to behave morally and immorally (Study 2)...
November 20, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29154617/objectifying-the-subjective-building-blocks-of-metacognitive-experiences-in-conflict-tasks
#3
Laurence Questienne, Anne Atas, Boris Burle, Wim Gevers
Metacognitive appraisals are essential for optimizing our information processing. In conflict tasks, metacognitive appraisals can result from different interrelated features (e.g., motor activity, visual awareness, response speed). Thanks to an original approach combining behavioral and electromyographic measures, the current study objectified the contribution of three features (reaction time [RT], motor hesitation with and without response competition, and visual congruency) to the subjective experience of urge-to-err in a priming conflict task...
November 20, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29154616/do-we-see-it-or-not-sensory-attenuation-in-the-visual-domain
#4
Katharina A Schwarz, Roland Pfister, Michel Kluge, Lisa Weller, Wilfried Kunde
Sensory consequences of an agent's actions are perceived less intensely than sensory stimuli that are not caused (and thus not predicted) by the observer. This effect of sensory attenuation has been discussed as a key principle of perception, potentially mediating various crucial functions such as agency and the discrimination of self-caused sensory stimulation from stimuli caused by external factors. Precise models describe the theoretical underpinnings of this phenomenon across a variety of modalities, especially the auditory, tactile, and visual domain...
November 20, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29154615/differential-discounting-and-present-impact-of-past-information
#5
Laura Brandimarte, Joachim Vosgerau, Alessandro Acquisti
How does information about a person's past, accessed now, affect individuals' impressions of that person? In 2 survey experiments and 2 experiments with actual incentives, we compare whether, when evaluating a person, information about that person's past greedy or immoral behaviors is discounted similarly to information about her past generous or moral behaviors. We find that, no matter how far in the past a person behaved greedily or immorally, information about her negative behaviors is hardly discounted at all...
November 20, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29154614/unrealistic-optimism-in-advice-taking-a-computational-account
#6
Yuan Chang Leong, Jamil Zaki
Expert advisors often make surprisingly inaccurate predictions about the future, yet people heed their suggestions nonetheless. Here we provide a novel, computational account of this unrealistic optimism in advice taking. Across 3 studies, participants observed as advisors predicted the performance of a stock. Advisors varied in their accuracy, performing reliably above, at, or below chance. Despite repeated feedback, participants exhibited inflated perceptions of advisors' accuracy, and reliably "bet" on advisors' predictions more than their performance warranted...
November 20, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29154613/the-ego-moving-metaphor-of-time-relies-on-visual-experience-no-representation-of-time-along-the-sagittal-space-in-the-blind
#7
Luca Rinaldi, Tomaso Vecchi, Micaela Fantino, Lotfi B Merabet, Zaira Cattaneo
In many cultures, humans conceptualize the past as behind the body and the future as in front. Whether this spatial mapping of time depends on visual experience is still not known. Here, we addressed this issue by testing early-blind participants in a space-time motor congruity task requiring them to classify a series of words as referring to the past or the future by moving their hand backward or forward. Sighted participants showed a preferential mapping between forward movements and future-words and backward movements and past-words...
November 20, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29154612/alexithymia-is-associated-with-a-multidomain-multidimensional-failure-of-interoception-evidence-from-novel-tests
#8
Jennifer Murphy, Caroline Catmur, Geoffrey Bird
Interoception, the perception of the body's internal state, contributes to numerous aspects of higher-order cognition. Several theories suggest a causal role for atypical interoception in specific psychiatric disorders, including a recent claim that atypical interoception represents a transdiagnostic impairment across disorders characterized by reduced perception of one's own emotion (alexithymia). Such theories are supported predominantly by evidence from only one interoceptive domain (cardiac); however, evidence of domain-specific interoceptive ability highlights the need to assess interoception in noncardiac domains...
November 20, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29072476/oxytocin-modulates-charismatic-influence-in-groups
#9
Ilanit Gordon, Yair Berson
Charismatic leaders have had tremendous effects on the fortunes and fates of individuals and societies across the world. Via verbal and nonverbal signaling, such leaders form profound emotional bonds with followers. Despite evidence for its powerful effects, we know very little about what facilitates the charismatic relationship. Here, we argue that the neuropeptide oxytocin (OT), known to be implicated in parent-child attachment, also enhances the effects of charismatic leaders in groups. In a double-blind placebo-controlled study, we administered intranasal OT to participants, led by a confederate trained to exhibit charisma, and monitored participants' responses to the confederate's signaling while leading a group task...
October 26, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29058942/the-effects-of-bedtime-writing-on-difficulty-falling-asleep-a-polysomnographic-study-comparing-to-do-lists-and-completed-activity-lists
#10
Michael K Scullin, Madison L Krueger, Hannah K Ballard, Natalya Pruett, Donald L Bliwise
Bedtime worry, including worrying about incomplete future tasks, is a significant contributor to difficulty falling asleep. Previous research showed that writing about one's worries can help individuals fall asleep. We investigated whether the temporal focus of bedtime writing-writing a to-do list versus journaling about completed activities-affected sleep onset latency. Fifty-seven healthy young adults (18-30) completed a writing assignment for 5 min prior to overnight polysomnography recording in a controlled sleep laboratory...
October 23, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29058941/implications-of-individual-differences-in-on-average-null-effects
#11
Jeff Miller, Wolf Schwarz
Most psychological models are intended to describe processes that operate within each individual. In many research areas, however, models are tested by looking at results averaged across many individuals, despite the fact that such averaged results may give a misleading picture of what is true for each one. We consider this conundrum with respect to the interpretation of on-average null effects. Specifically, even though an experimental manipulation might have no effect on average across individuals, it might still have demonstrable effects-albeit in opposite directions-for many or all of the individuals tested...
October 23, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29058940/much-ado-about-aha-insight-problem-solving-is-strongly-related-to-working-memory-capacity-and-reasoning-ability
#12
Adam Chuderski, Jan Jastrzębski
A battery comprising 4 fluid reasoning tests as well as 13 working memory (WM) tasks that involved storage, recall, updating, binding, and executive control, was applied to 318 adults in order to evaluate the true relationship of reasoning ability and WM capacity (WMC) to insight problem solving, measured using 40 verbal, spatial, math, matchstick, and remote associates problems (insight problems). WMC predicted 51.8% of variance in insight problem solving and virtually explained its almost isomorphic link to reasoning ability (84...
October 23, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29058939/tests-of-an-exemplar-memory-model-of-classification-learning-in-a-high-dimensional-natural-science-category-domain
#13
Robert M Nosofsky, Craig A Sanders, Mark A McDaniel
Experiments were conducted in which novice participants learned to classify pictures of rocks into real-world, scientifically defined categories. The experiments manipulated the distribution of training instances during an initial study phase, and then tested for correct classification and generalization performance during a transfer phase. The similarity structure of the to-be-learned categories was also manipulated across the experiments. A low-parameter version of an exemplar-memory model, used in combination with a high-dimensional feature-space representation for the rock stimuli, provided good overall accounts of the categorization data...
October 23, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28967763/effects-of-learning-on-somatosensory-decision-making-and-experiences
#14
Akib Ul Huque, Ellen Poliakoff, Richard J Brown
Operant conditioning has been shown to influence perceptual decision making in the auditory and visual modalities but the effects of conditioning on touch perception are unknown. If conditioning can be used to reduce the tendency to misinterpret somatic noise as signal (tactile false alarms), there may be the potential to use similar procedures in the treatment of excessive physical symptom reporting in clinical settings. We explored this possibility in 4 experiments investigating whether the false alarm (FA) rate in a somatic signal detection task (SSDT) could be altered with operant conditioning, and whether the resultant learning would transfer to other sensory decisions...
October 2, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28933892/erasing-and-blurring-memories-the-differential-impact-of-interference-on-separate-aspects-of-forgetting
#15
Sol Z Sun, Celia Fidalgo, Morgan D Barense, Andy C H Lee, Jonathan S Cant, Susanne Ferber
Interference disrupts information processing across many timescales, from immediate perception to memory over short and long durations. The widely held similarity assumption states that as similarity between interfering information and memory contents increases, so too does the degree of impairment. However, information is lost from memory in different ways. For instance, studied content might be erased in an all-or-nothing manner. Alternatively, information may be retained but the precision might be degraded or blurred...
September 21, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922001/reasons-probably-won-t-change-your-mind-the-role-of-reasons-in-revising-moral-decisions
#16
Matthew L Stanley, Ashley M Dougherty, Brenda W Yang, Paul Henne, Felipe De Brigard
Although many philosophers argue that making and revising moral decisions ought to be a matter of deliberating over reasons, the extent to which the consideration of reasons informs people's moral decisions and prompts them to change their decisions remains unclear. Here, after making an initial decision in 2-option moral dilemmas, participants examined reasons for only the option initially chosen (affirming reasons), reasons for only the option not initially chosen (opposing reasons), or reasons for both options...
September 18, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29094964/a-combined-experimental-and-individual-differences-investigation-into-mind-wandering-during-a-video-lecture
#17
Michael J Kane, Bridget A Smeekens, Claudia C von Bastian, John H Lurquin, Nicholas P Carruth, Akira Miyake
A combined experimental-correlational study with a diverse sample (N = 182) from 2 research sites tested a set of 5 a priori hypotheses about mind wandering and learning, using a realistic video lecture on introductory statistics. Specifically, the study examined whether students' vulnerability to mind wandering during the lecture would predict learning from, and situational interest in, the video and also whether longhand note-taking would help reduce mind wandering, at least for some students. One half of the participants took notes during the video, and all were subsequently tested on lecture content without notes...
November 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28714710/a-relative-bilingual-advantage-in-switching-with-preparation-nuanced-explorations-of-the-proposed-association-between-bilingualism-and-task-switching
#18
Alena Stasenko, Georg E Matt, Tamar H Gollan
Bilingual language switching may increase general switching efficiency, but the evidence on this question is mixed. We hypothesized that group differences in switching might be stronger at a long cue-target interval (CTI), which may better tap general switching abilities (Yehene & Meiran, 2007). Eighty Spanish-English bilinguals and 80 monolinguals completed a color-shape switching task, and an analogous language-switching task, varying CTI (short vs. long) in both tasks. With longer preparation time (long CTI), bilinguals exhibited significantly smaller task-switching costs than monolinguals, but only in the first half of trials...
November 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28967777/pseudo-set-framing
#19
Kate Barasz, Leslie K John, Elizabeth A Keenan, Michael I Norton
Pseudo-set framing-arbitrarily grouping items or tasks together as part of an apparent "set"-motivates people to reach perceived completion points. Pseudo-set framing changes gambling choices (Study 1), effort (Studies 2 and 3), giving behavior (Field Data and Study 4), and purchase decisions (Study 5). These effects persist in the absence of any reward, when a cost must be incurred, and after participants are explicitly informed of the arbitrariness of the set. Drawing on Gestalt psychology, we develop a conceptual account that predicts what will-and will not-act as a pseudo-set, and defines the psychological process through which these pseudo-sets affect behavior: over and above typical reference points, pseudo-set framing alters perceptions of (in)completeness, making intermediate progress seem less complete...
October 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28967776/power-as-an-emotional-liability-implications-for-perceived-authenticity-and-trust-after-a-transgression
#20
Peter H Kim, Alexandra Mislin, Ece Tuncel, Ryan Fehr, Arik Cheshin, Gerben A van Kleef
People may express a variety of emotions after committing a transgression. Through 6 empirical studies and a meta-analysis, we investigate how the perceived authenticity of such emotional displays and resulting levels of trust are shaped by the transgressor's power. Past findings suggest that individuals with power tend to be more authentic because they have more freedom to act on the basis of their own personal inclinations. Yet, our findings reveal that (a) a transgressor's display of emotion is perceived to be less authentic when that party's power is high rather than low; (b) this perception of emotional authenticity, in turn, directly influences (and mediates) the level of trust in that party; and (c) perceivers ultimately exert less effort when asked to make a case for leniency toward high rather than low-power transgressors...
October 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
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