journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Clinics in Perinatology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837762/assisted-ventilation-in-newborns-less-may-be-more
#1
EDITORIAL
Lucky Jain
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837761/noninvasive-ventilation
#2
EDITORIAL
Bradley A Yoder, Haresh Kirpalani
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837760/nasal-intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation-for-preterm-neonates-synchronized-or-not
#3
REVIEW
Markus Waitz, Lars Mense, Haresh Kirpalani, Brigitte Lemyre
Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an effective strategy to prevent invasive ventilation, failure rates are high and many babies require endotracheal intubation. Prolonged exposure to mechanical ventilation is linked with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and other morbidities. Different techniques of nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) have been proposed as an alternative to CPAP. Bilevel NIPPV and conventional mechanical ventilator-driven NIPPV are used in clinical practice...
December 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837759/noninvasive-support-does-it-really-decrease-bronchopulmonary-dysplasia
#4
REVIEW
Clyde J Wright, Richard A Polin
Noninvasive support of preterm infants with respiratory distress is an evidenced-based strategy to decrease the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the only noninvasive strategy with sufficient evidence to support its use in acute respiratory distress syndrome. It is unclear if one method for delivering CPAP is superior to another. Future research will focus on strategies (eg, sustained lung inflation, and administration of surfactant using a thin plastic catheter) that increase the likelihood of success with CPAP, especially in infants with a gestational age of less than 26 weeks...
December 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837758/the-role-of-caffeine-in-noninvasive-respiratory-support
#5
REVIEW
Nicole R Dobson, Ravi Mangal Patel
Caffeine is one of the most commonly prescribed medications in preterm neonates and is widely used to treat or prevent apnea of prematurity. Caffeine therapy is safe, effectively decreases apnea, and improves short- and long-term outcomes in preterm infants. In this review, the authors summarize the role of caffeine therapy for preterm infants receiving noninvasive respiratory support. As caffeine is already widely used, recent data are summarized that may guide clinicians in optimizing the use of caffeine therapy, with a review of the timing of initiation, dose, and duration of therapy...
December 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837757/minimally-invasive-surfactant-therapy-and-noninvasive-respiratory-support
#6
REVIEW
Angela Kribs
Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) caused by surfactant deficiency is major cause for neonatal mortality and short- and long-term morbidity of preterm infants. Continuous positive airway pressure and other modes of noninvasive respiratory support and intubation and positive pressure ventilation with surfactant therapy are efficient therapies for RDS. Because continuous positive airway pressure can fail in severe surfactant deficiency, and because traditional surfactant therapy requires intubation and positive pressure ventilation, this entails a risk of lung injury...
December 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837756/noninvasive-respiratory-support-during-transportation
#7
REVIEW
Donald Null, Kevin Crezee, Tamara Bleak
To minimize ventilator-associated lung injury in neonates, use of noninvasive (NIV) respiratory support has markedly increased over the past decade, especially in neonates younger than 28-weeks gestational age and 1250 g. Previously, neonates with respiratory failure who required anything greater than an oxyhood or low-flow nasal cannula were intubated for transport. This increased use has required transport teams to develop or incorporate a new set of support tools to minimize lung injury. This article reviews the various modes of NIV used during neonatal transport, important patient selection criteria, appropriate assessment, and the associated risks and benefits...
December 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837755/high-frequency-ventilation-as-a-mode-of-noninvasive-respiratory-support
#8
REVIEW
Amit Mukerji, Michael Dunn
High-frequency ventilation (HFV) as a mode of noninvasive respiratory support (NRS) in preterm neonates is gaining popularity. Benefits may accrue from combining the ventilatory efficiency of HFV delivered through a noninvasive interface, enhancing respiratory support while potentially limiting lung injury. Current evidence suggests that noninvasive HFV (NIHFV) may be superior to other NRS modes in eliminating carbon dioxide and preventing endotracheal ventilation after failure of other NRS modes. Animal data suggest NIHFV may promote improved alveolar development compared to endotracheal ventilation...
December 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837754/neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-for-noninvasive-support-in-neonates
#9
REVIEW
Kimberly S Firestone, Jennifer Beck, Howard Stein
Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is frequently used in the NICU to avoid intubation or as postextubation support for spontaneously breathing infants experiencing respiratory distress. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) is used as a mode of noninvasive support in which both the timing and degree of ventilatory assist are controlled by the patient. NIV-NAVA has been successfully used clinically in neonates as a mode of ventilation to prevent intubation, allow early extubation, and as a novel way to deliver nasal continuous positive airway pressure...
December 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837753/evidence-support-and-guidelines-for-using-heated-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannulae-in-neonatology-oxford-nasal-high-flow-therapy-meeting-2015
#10
REVIEW
Charles C Roehr, Bradley A Yoder, Peter G Davis, Kevin Ives
Nasal high-flow therapy (nHFT) has become a popular form of noninvasive respiratory support in neonatal intensive care units. A meeting held in Oxford, UK, in June 2015 examined the evidence base and proposed a consensus statement. In summary, nHFT is effective for support of preterm infants following extubation. There is growing evidence evaluating its use in the primary treatment of respiratory distress. Further study is needed to assess which clinical conditions are most amenable to nHFT support, the most effective flow rates, and escalation and weaning strategies...
December 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837752/nasal-high-flow-therapy-for-preterm-infants-review-of-neonatal-trial-data
#11
REVIEW
Brett J Manley
Heated, humidified, nasal high-flow (HF) therapy is a promising treatment for preterm infants, and almost certainly has a place in the clinical care of this population. It is only in the last few years that data have become available from randomized trials comparing HF with other noninvasive respiratory support modes, particularly nasal continuous positive airway pressure. This article discusses the evidence for HF use from randomized clinical trials in preterm infants and proposes recommendations for evidence-based practice...
December 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837751/continuous-positive-airway-pressure-strategies-with-bubble-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-not-all-bubbling-is-the-same-the-seattle-positive-airway-pressure-system
#12
REVIEW
Stephen E Welty
Premature neonates are predisposed to complications, including bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). BPD is associated with long-term pulmonary and neurodevelopmental consequences. Noninvasive respiratory support with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been recommended strongly by the American Academy of Pediatrics. However, CPAP implementation has shown at least a 50% failure rate. Enhancing nasal CPAP effectiveness may decrease the need for mechanical ventilation and reduce the incidence of BPD...
December 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837750/continuous-positive-airway-pressure-to-bubble-or-not-to-bubble
#13
REVIEW
Samir Gupta, Steven M Donn
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) systems can be broadly grouped into continuous flow or variable flow devices. Bubble CPAP (bCPAP) is a continuous flow device and has physiologic properties that could facilitate gas exchange. Its efficacy has been reported to be similar to variable flow CPAP systems when used as a primary mode of respiratory support. Post-extubation bCPAP is reported to significantly reduce extubation failure rates among preterm infants ventilated for less than 2 week when compared to Infant flow driver CPAP (variable flow)...
December 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837749/sustained-lung-inflation-physiology-and-practice
#14
REVIEW
Elizabeth E Foglia, Arjan B Te Pas
Lung aeration is the most critical task newborns must accomplish after birth. Almost all extremely preterm infants require respiratory support during this process, but the best method to promote lung aeration in preterm infants is unknown. The current standard practice is intermittent positive pressure ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure. Sustained inflation is a promising alternative strategy for lung liquid clearance and aeration. Here we review the physiologic rationale for sustained inflation and the available clinical evidence for sustained inflation in preterm infants...
December 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837748/physiologic-basis-for-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-heated-and-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-and-nasal-ventilation
#15
REVIEW
Kevin C Dysart
Noninvasive support modalities have become ever more present in the care of newborns with a wide variety of disease processes. As clinicians have continued to avoid intubation and mechanical ventilation in preterm and term infants, the technologies available to support these groups have grown. Despite this rapid growth they can be broken down into 3 large categories of support, all attempting to deliver both flow and pressure to the nasopharynx supporting both phases of spontaneous breathing. The goal of all of the therapies is to stabilize a heterogeneous group of disorders with some common pathologies and avoid invasive support modalities...
December 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27524458/birth-asphyxia-and-the-inextricable-intersection-of-fetal-and-neonatal-physiology
#16
EDITORIAL
Lucky Jain
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27524457/birth-asphyxia-providing-care-for-mothers-fetuses-and-newborns-across-the-perinatal-continuum
#17
EDITORIAL
Beena D Kamath-Rayne, Alan H Jobe
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27524456/global-burden-epidemiologic-trends-and-prevention-of-intrapartum-related-deaths-in-low-resource-settings
#18
REVIEW
Shabina Ariff, Anne Cc Lee, Joy Lawn, Zulfiqar A Bhutta
Intrapartum-related neonatal deaths include live-born infants who die in the first 28 days of life from neonatal encephalopathy or die before onset of neonatal encephalopathy and have evidence of intrapartum injury. A smaller portion of the population in poorer countries has access to basic obstetric and postnatal care causing neonatal mortality rates to be higher. Presence of a skilled birth attendant and provision of basic emergency obstetric care can reduce intrapartum birth asphyxia by 40%. With the announcement of Sustainable Development Goals and global Every Newborn Action Plan, there is hope that interventions around continuum of care will save lives...
September 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27524455/neonatal-resuscitation-in-low-resource-settings
#19
REVIEW
Sara K Berkelhamer, Beena D Kamath-Rayne, Susan Niermeyer
Almost one quarter of newborn deaths are attributed to birth asphyxia. Systematic implementation of newborn resuscitation programs has the potential to avert many of these deaths as basic resuscitative measures alone can reduce neonatal mortality. Simplified resuscitation training provided through Helping Babies Breathe decreases early neonatal mortality and stillbirth. However, challenges remain in providing every newborn the needed care at birth. Barriers include ineffective educational systems and programming; inadequate equipment, personnel and data monitoring; and limited political and social support to improve care...
September 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27524454/long-term-cognitive-outcomes-of-birth-asphyxia-and-the-contribution-of-identified-perinatal-asphyxia-to-cerebral-palsy
#20
REVIEW
Athina Pappas, Steven J Korzeniewski
Neonatal encephalopathy among survivors of presumed perinatal asphyxia is recognized as an important cause of cerebral palsy (CP) and neuromotor impairment. Recent studies suggest that moderate to severe neonatal encephalopathy contributes to a wide range of neurodevelopmental and cognitive impairments among survivors with and without CP. Nearly 1 of every 4 to 5 neonates treated with hypothermia has or develops CP. Neonatal encephalopathy is diagnosed in only approximately 10% of all cases. This article reviews the long-term cognitive outcomes of children with presumed birth asphyxia and describes what is known about its contribution to CP...
September 2016: Clinics in Perinatology
journal
journal
25624
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"