Read by QxMD icon Read

Medical Clinics of North America

Scott Kahan, Robert F Kushner
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Edward R Bollard
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Jamy D Ard, Gary Miller, Scott Kahan
Obesity is a common disorder with complex causes. The epidemic has spurred significant advances in the understanding of nutritional approaches to treating obesity. Although the primary challenge is to introduce a dietary intake that creates an energy deficit, clinicians should also consider targeted risk factor modification with manipulation of the nutrient profile of the weight-reducing diet. These strategies produce significant weight loss and improvements in cardiometabolic risk factors. Future research is needed to better understand how to personalize nutrient prescriptions further to promote optimal risk modification and maintenance of long-term energy balance in the weight-reduced state...
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
David Heber, Zhaoping Li
Nutrition intervention supports the patient with malnutrition secondary to cancer and its treatment and has been used in the primary and secondary prevention of common forms of cancer. During the emotional stress of dealing with cancer at any stage, patients derive increased quality of life and a sense of control over their lives as the result of receiving supportive advice on diet and lifestyle. Therefore, the use of nutrition intervention in cancer patients is justified in the absence of absolute proof of efficacy as long as it is done safely and with the consent of the cancer patient...
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Carolina Frade Magalhaes Girardin Pimentel, Michelle Lai
The progressively increasing rates of obesity have led to a worldwide epidemic of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. It is currently the most common cause of liver disease worldwide and projected to be the leading indication for liver transplantation in the United States by 2020. NAFLD is associated with both liver-related and overall mortality. Undoubtedly, nutrition interventions are key in the treatment of NAFLD, to reverse the disease, and prevent disease progression, complications, and associated comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes...
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Michael A Via, Jeffrey I Mechanick
For individuals at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus or the metabolic syndrome, adherence to an idealized dietary pattern can drastically alter the risk and course of these chronic conditions. Target levels of carbohydrate intake should approximate 30% of consumed calories. Healthy food choices should include copious fruits, vegetables, and nuts while minimizing foods with high glycemic indices, especially processed foods.
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Cheryl A M Anderson, Hoang Anh Nguyen, Dena E Rifkin
Dietary modification is recommended in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Individuals with CKD often have multiple comorbidities, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease, for which dietary modification is also recommended. As CKD progresses, nutrition plays an important role in mitigating risk for cardiovascular disease and decline in kidney function. The objectives of nutrition interventions in CKD include management of risk factors, ensuring optimal nutritional status throughout all stages of CKD, preventing buildup of toxic metabolic products, and avoiding complications of CKD...
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Janet M de Jesus, Scott Kahan, Robert H Eckel
Nutrition therapy is effective at controlling cardiovascular disease risk factors and therefore reducing cardiovascular disease risk. Physicians should play an active role in providing nutrition interventions for patients who would benefit from cardiovascular disease risk reduction or refer them to other professionals as needed. The evidence on nutrition interventions for blood pressure and lipid control, including overall dietary patterns, dietary fat and macronutrients, dietary cholesterol, sodium, and alcohol intake, is discussed...
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Hope Barkoukis
Maintaining optimal health and well-being in the older adult requires understanding of how physiologic changes influence nutritional status, familiarity with the available validated tools to assess status, identification of factors predisposing older adults to malnutrition, and evidence-based practice regarding the nutritional needs of this age group. Evidence-based guidance on these core practice components is provided to the clinician in this article.
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Mark R Corkins, Stephen R Daniels, Sarah D de Ferranti, Neville H Golden, Jae H Kim, Sheela N Magge, Sarah Jane Schwarzenberg
Nutrition is a critical factor for appropriate child and adolescent development. Appropriate nutrition changes according to age. Nutrition is an important element for prevention of disease development, especially for chronic diseases. Many children and adolescents live in environments that do not promote optimum nutrition. Families must work to provide improved food environments to encourage optimum nutrition. Early primordial prevention of risk factors for chronic disease, such as cardiovascular disease, is important, and dietary habits established early may be carried through adult life...
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Michelle A Kominiarek, Priya Rajan
The nutritional status of a woman during pregnancy and lactation is not only critical for her health but for future generations. Although a nutritionist or registered dietitian can help facilitate dietary counseling and interventions, physicians also need to be cognizant of nutritional needs during pregnancy because they differ significantly compared with nonpregnant populations. Furthermore, an individualized approach to nutritional counseling that considers a woman's nutritional status and body mass index is recommended...
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Ruth W Kimokoti, Barbara E Millen
Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States and globally, and are attributable largely to poor nutrition and suboptimal lifestyle behaviors. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans promote healthy eating and lifestyle patterns across the lifespan to reduce risk of NCDs. Physicians are well positioned to provide lifestyle preventive interventions that are personalized to their patients' biological needs and cultural preferences through multidisciplinary team activities or referral to professional nutrition and physical activity experts...
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Ryan T Hurt, Stephen A McClave
Alterations in nutritional status are common and can be associated with increased morbidity and mortality. However, for healthcare providers, the definition of malnutrition is vague, insensitive, and poorly standardized. In contrast, nutrition risk is more easily defined, and recognizes that both poor nutritional status and disease severity contribute to increased morbidity and mortality. Clinicians need to identify patients who may already have evidence of nutrient deficiencies or have disease processes that affect nutrition risk...
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Robert F Kushner
Provision of dietary counseling in the office setting is enhanced by using team-based care and electronic tools. Effective provider-patient communication is essential for fostering behavior change: the key component of lifestyle medicine. The principles of communication and behavior change are skill-based and grounded in scientific theories and models. Motivational interviewing and shared decision making, a collaboration process between patients and their providers to reach agreement about a health decision, is an important process in counseling...
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Marc Shalaby, Edward R Bollard
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Meghan E Lembeck, Colette R Pameijer, Amy M Westcott
The decision of whether or not to use artificial nutrition or hydration is one with which many health care providers, patients, and families struggle. These decisions are particularly challenging in the setting of life-limiting illness, which is often associated with a prolonged decline because of medical advances in these patient populations. A patient-centered and family-centered approach helps to attain high-quality care in this special population.
September 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Jennifer Baldwin, Jaclyn Cox
The high prevalence of dyspnea at the end of life carries with it significant health and economic burden. Given the complex mechanism of dyspnea, management should be tailored to the individual patient experience and the underlying disease process. No clear role for supplemental oxygen has been established in the treatment of dyspnea in patients without no hypoxemia, and providers should consider the negative effects of oxygen supplementation. Symptom control with medications, exercise, behavioral therapy, treatment of associated anxiety, and the use of fans may be more effective and less costly than oxygen therapy...
September 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Margaret Kreher
Symptom control at the end of life is an identified ongoing gap in end-of-life care. Increased demand for high-quality symptom control; limited supply of specialty trained clinicians; lack of consistent high-quality evidence-based interventions; and education deficits among clinicians, patients, and families in end-of-life processes contribute to this gap. High-value end-of-life care is centered on high-quality communication about goals of care. This article reviews primary palliative care concepts of communication and symptom control to provide a framework for primary care physicians to use in the care of patients at the end of life...
September 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Ashley H Snyder, Allison Magnuson, Amy M Westcott
When screening for cancer in older adults, it is important to consider the risks of screening, how long it takes to benefit from screening, and the patient's comorbidities and life expectancy. Delivering high-value care requires the consideration of evidence-based screening guidelines and careful selection of patients. This article considers the impact of cancer. It explores perspectives on the costs of common cancer screening tests, illustrates how using life expectancy can help clinicians determine who will benefit most from screening, and provides tools to help clinicians discuss with their older patients when it may be appropriate to stop screening for cancer...
September 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Ruchir Trivedi, Marissa C Salvo
Dietary supplements are commonly used by patients as part of their medical care plan. Often clinicians may not be aware of their use, because patients do not always consider these to be medications. All clinicians need to continually ask patients about their use of dietary supplements when collecting a medication history. Dietary supplements and prescription medications often share similar enzymatic pathways for their metabolism. These interactions may lead to severe adverse reactions. This article reviews available evidence for a variety of dietary supplements in select disease categories...
September 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"