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Journal of Economic Entomology

Dimitrios N Avtzis, Dimitrios Petsopoulos, George I Memtsas, Nickolas G Kavallieratos, Christos G Athanassiou, Maria C Boukouvala
In the present work, we sampled individuals of the processionary pine moth, Thaumetopoea pityocampa (Denis and Schiffermüller; Lepidoptera: Notodontidae) from different areas of Greece between 2014 and 2016. These samples were sequenced for a 760-bp long mtDNA COI locus and the haplotypes retrieved clearly showed that the occurrence of T. pityocampa in Greece is being considerably restricted, with only 8 individuals out of the 221 exhibiting T. pityocampa haplotypes and the rest being identified as T. pityocampa ENA clade haplotypes...
March 17, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Jocelyn L Smith, Victor Limay-Rios, David C Hooker, Arthur W Schaafsma
Western bean cutworm, Striacosta albicosta (Smith; Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) has become a key pest of maize, Zea mays (L.), in Ontario, Canada which is challenging to control due to its lack of susceptibility to most Bt-maize events. Injury by S. albicosta may exacerbate Fusarium graminearum (Schwabe; Hypocreales: Nectriaceae) infection through provision of entry points on the ear. The objectives of this study were to: investigate the relationship between injury by S. albicosta and deoxynivalenol (DON) accumulation; evaluate non-Bt and Bt-maize hybrids, with and without insecticide and fungicide application; and determine optimal insecticide-fungicide application timing for reducing S...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Benjamin D Jaffe, Peter J Landolt
Male and female codling moths, Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), were shown to be attracted to a three-chemical kairomonal lure consisting of pear ester, acetic acid, and n-butyl sulfide. A controlled-release device based on sachets was developed in the laboratory and field tested to optimize the attractiveness of C. pomonella to this combination of attractants, and to decrease material costs associated with the controlled-release of these chemicals. The lure was most effective when pear ester was released from a separate dispenser than when combined acetic acid and n-butyl sulfide...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Timothy F Vandervoet, Peter C Ellsworth, Yves Carrière, Steven E Naranjo
Conservation biological control can be an effective tactic for minimizing insect-induced damage to agricultural production. In the Arizona cotton system, a suite of generalist arthropod predators provides critical regulation of Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (MEAM1) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and other pests. Arthropod predator and B. tabaci populations were manipulated with a range of broad-spectrum and selective insecticide exclusions to vary predator to prey interactions in a 2-yr field study. Predator to prey ratios associated with B...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Neshat Golikhajeh, Bahram Naseri, Jabraeil Razmjou, Reza Hosseini, Marzieh Asadi Aghbolaghi
In order to understand the population genetic diversity and structure of Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), a serious pest of sugar beet in Iran and the world, we genotyped 133 individuals from seven regions in Iran using four microsatellite loci. Significant difference was seen between the observed and expected heterozygosity in all loci. A lower observed heterozygosity than expected heterozygosity indicated a low heterozygosity in these populations. The value of F showed a high genetic differentiation, so that the mean of Fst was 0...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Vivek Kumar, Antonio Francis, Pasco B Avery, Cindy L McKenzie, Lance S Osborne
Rugose spiraling whitefly (RSW), Aleurodicus rugioperculatus Martin (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a new invasive whitefly pest in the Florida landscape, known to feed on a wide range of plants including palms, woody ornamentals, shrubs, and fruits. With the objective to find an alternative to neonicotinoid insecticides, and develop an ecofriendly management program for RSW, in the current study we evaluated the efficacy of a biopesticide containing the entomopathogenic fungi, Isaria fumosorosea Wize (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae), and an insect growth regulator buprofezin applied alone and in combination under laboratory and field conditions...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Junxiang Wang, Guifang Lin, Khadija Batool, Shuaiqi Zhang, Mingfeng Chen, Jin Xu, Juan Wu, Liang Jin, Ivan Gelbic, Lei Xu, Lingling Zhang, Xiong Guan
Ectropis oblique Prout (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) is one of the main pests that damages the tea crop in Southeast Asia. To understand the molecular mechanisms of its feeding biology, transcriptomes of the alimentary tract (AT) and of the body minus the AT of E. oblique were successfully sequenced and analyzed in this study. A total of 36,950 unigenes from de novo sequences were assembled. After analysis using six annotation databases (e.g., Gene Ontology, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome, and NCBI nr), a series of putative genes were found for this insect species that were related to digestion, detoxification, the immune system, and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) receptors...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Daniel Nicodemo, Fábio Ermínio Mingatto, Amanda de Carvalho, Paulo Francisco Veiga Bizerra, Marco Aurélio Tavares, Kamila Vilas Boas Balieira, William Cesar Bellini
Silkworm cocoon production has been reduced due to a number of problems other than those inherent in sericulture, such as diseases, malnutrition, and inappropriate management. The use of pesticides in areas surrounding mulberry fields can contaminate these plants and consequently harm caterpillars. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the application of the fungicide pyraclostrobin in mulberry plants interferes with the mitochondrial bioenergetics and the productive performance of silkworms. Mulberry plants were treated with pyraclostrobin (0, 100, 200, and 300 g ha-1)...
March 9, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Frederico Hickmann, Alexssandro F de Morais, Eduarda S Bronzatto, Tiago Giacomelli, Jerson V C Guedes, Oderlei Bernardi
The lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer, 1797) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is considered the primary insect pest in broiler farms in Brazil. In this study, we characterized the susceptibility of A. diaperinus populations from broiler farms of southern Brazil to cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos. Larvae and adults of A. diaperinus were exposed to these technical insecticides diluted in acetone in residual bioassays. A geographic variation in the susceptibility of larvae and adults of A. diaperinus to both insecticides was detected...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Vinicius A D'Ávila, Wagner F Barbosa, Raul N C Guedes, G Christopher Cutler
Insecticides can affect biological control by parasitoids. Here, we examined the lethal and sublethal effects of two conventional insecticides, imidacloprid and lambda-cyhalothrin, and a reduced-risk bioinsecticide, spinosad, on the aphid parasitoid Aphidius colemani Viereck (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Concentration-mortality curves generated from insecticide residue bioassays found that wasps were nearly 20-fold more susceptible to spinosad than imidacloprid and lambda-cyhalothrin. Imidacloprid and lambda-cyhalothrin compromised adult parasitoid longevity, but not as dramatically as spinosad: concentrations >200 ng spinosad/cm2 reduced wasp longevity by half...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Tewodros T Wakie, Wee L Yee, Lisa G Neven
The European cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis cerasi (L.) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a highly destructive pest of cherries (Prunus spp.) (Rosaceae) in Europe and Asia. In 2016, R. cerasi was detected in Ontario, Canada, and in 2017 in New York State, USA, the first records of this pest in North America. The initial detections in Canada caused concern for the major cherry-growing states of Michigan, Washington, Oregon, and California in the United States. Establishment of R. cerasi in the United States could restrict cherry exports to other markets and increase costs needed for fly control, but it is unknown if R...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Yuki Henselek, Elisabeth J Eilers, Claire Kremen, Stephen D Hendrix, Alexandra-Maria Klein
Almond (Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D. A. Webb; Rosales: Rosaceae) is a cash crop with an estimated global value of over seven billion U.S. dollars annually and commercial varieties are highly dependent on insect pollination. Therefore, the understanding of basic pollination requirements of the main varieties including pollination efficiency of honey bees (Apis mellifera, Linnaeus, Hymenoptera: Apidae) and wild pollinators is essential for almond production. We first conducted two lab experiments to examine the threshold number of pollen grains needed for successful pollination and to determine if varietal identity or diversity promotes fruit set and weight...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Octavio Menocal, Paul E Kendra, Wayne S Montgomery, Jonathan H Crane, Daniel Carrillo
Ambrosia beetles have emerged as significant pests of avocado ((Persea americana Mill. [Laurales: Lauraceae])) due to their association with pathogenic fungal symbionts, most notably Raffaelea lauricola T.C. Harr., Fraedrich & Aghayeva (Ophiostomatales: Ophiostomataceae), the causal agent of the laurel wilt (LW) disease. We evaluated the interaction of ambrosia beetles with host avocado trees by documenting their flight height and daily flight periodicity in Florida orchards with LW. Flight height was assessed passively in three avocado orchards by using ladder-like arrays of unbaited sticky traps arranged at three levels (low: 0-2 m; middle: 2-4 m; high: 4-6 m)...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Andrew Galimberti, Andrei Alyokhin
Mineral oil is a product used to reduce Potato Virus Y transmission in potato fields. However, there is little information available about other effects that oil may have on insect pests of potato. To better understand how mineral oil affects potato pests, we performed a series of experiments testing the effects of oil on mortality, behavior, and development of potato aphids, Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), green peach aphids, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), and Colorado potato beetles, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
F H Arthur, M N Ghimire, S W Myers, T W Phillips
The khapra beetle, Trogoderma granarium Everts (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), is a serious pest of stored products and is the only stored product insect pest that triggers a quarantine response when it is found in the United States. The larvae of T. granarium feed on a wide range of dry food products of plant and animal origin, including cereals, dried fish, and museum specimens. In this study, we evaluated the residual efficacy of two pyrethroid insecticides, deltamethrin and cyfluthrin, applied on concrete, wood, painted wood, vinyl flooring tile, and metal surfaces using small and large T...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Kelly Breeds, N Francois V Burger, Anna-Maria Botha
Epigenetic modifications provide a means for aphid biotype development that a lack of genetic variation, owing to an anholocyclic reproduction lifecycle, fails to do. Here we present data on the DNA methylation status in four South African Russian wheat aphids (RWA), Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjomov) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) biotypes expressing different levels of virulence against its host, Triticum aestivum L. (Poales: Poaceae, Triticeae). The DNA methylation status of these biotypes was determined through the use of methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analysis, restriction site-specific fluorescence labeling-a novel technique, and measuring relative global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Joop C van Lenteren, V H P Bueno, F J Calvo, Ana M Calixto, Flavio C Montes
Tuta absoluta (Meyrick; Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) is a key pest of tomato and is quickly spreading over the world. We conducted an experiment aimed at evaluating the control capacity and risk for plant damage of three Neotropical mirid species, Campyloneuropsis infumatus (Carvalho; Hemiptera: Miridae), Engytatus varians (Distant; Hemiptera: Miridae) and Macrolophus basicornis (Stal; Hemiptera: Miridae) on T. absoluta infested tomato plants in large cages in an experimental greenhouse. During three successive periods of 9 wk each, we followed population development of the three mirids when exposed to T...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Frida A Zink, Luke R Tembrock, Alicia E Timm, Todd M Gilligan
The silver Y moth [Autographa gamma (Linneaus) (Noctuidae: Plusiinae)] is a pervasive crop pest in its native range but has not been found in moth surveys in the United States. Specimens of A. gamma are often intercepted at U.S. ports of entry, so the risk of introduction of this invasive species is high. Currently, identification of Plusiinae adults captured in domestic surveys is done by morphlogical comparison; however, this method is time consuming and misidentifications have occurred in the past. A recent study outlined a real-time PCR assay capable of rapidly identifying individual A...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Ary A Hoffmann, Perran A Ross
Insects and other invertebrates can readily adapt to a range of environmental conditions and these include conditions used in artificial rearing. This can lead to problems when mass rearing insects and mites for release as biocontrol agents or in sterile insect control programs, and when using laboratory strains to understand field population dynamics. Laboratory adaptation experiments also help to understand potential rates of trait evolution and repeatability of evolutionary changes. Here, we review evidence for laboratory adaptation across invertebrates, contrasting different taxonomic groups and providing estimates of the rate of evolutionary change across trait classes...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
Hehe Wang, George G Kennedy, Francis P F Reay-Jones, Dominic D Reisig, Michael D Toews, Phillip M Roberts, D Ames Herbert, Sally Taylor, Alana L Jacobson, Jeremy K Greene
Traditional identification of thrips species based on morphology is difficult, laborious, and especially challenging for immature thrips. To support monitoring and management efforts of thrips as consistent and widespread pests of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), a probe-based quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay with crude DNA extraction was developed to allow efficient and specific identification of the primary species of thrips infesting cotton. The assay was applied to identify over 5,000 specimens of thrips (including 3,366 immatures) collected on cotton seedlings from Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia in 2016...
February 28, 2018: Journal of Economic Entomology
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