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North Carolina Medical Journal

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228147/naloxone-prescribing-practices-a-missed-opportunity
#1
LETTER
Shane Stone, Erin Barnes, Christopher J McLouth, Candice J McNeil
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228146/running-the-numbers-trends-in-lead-poisoning-prevention-data-for-children-aged-6-years-in-north-carolina
#2
Kim Angelon-Gaetz, Ann Newman Chelminski
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228145/philanthropy-profile-protecting-north-carolina-s-health-by-investing-in-a-healthy-environment
#3
June Blotnick, H Kim Lyerly
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228144/clean-construction-practices-at-hospitals-improve-public-health
#4
Rachel McIntosh-Kastrinsky, Tom Zweng
Diesel exhaust has been linked to numerous health issues, especially for people with respiratory and cardiovascular conditions. The Clean Construction Partnership encourages health systems to use low-emission construction equipment and reduce idling at their construction sites. Every dollar spent on reducing diesel pollution results in $13 in public health benefits [1].
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228143/the-health-impacts-of-environmental-policy-the-north-carolina-clean-smokestacks-act
#5
Julia Kravchenko, H Kim Lyerly, William Ross
The North Carolina Clean Smokestacks Act and related policies led to substantial decreases of emitted air pollutants from coal-fired power plants. Improved air quality was associated with statewide improvements in respiratory, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular health in North Carolina. The effectiveness of environmental policies can be monitored for impact on both environmental and health outcomes.
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228142/connecting-environmental-justice-and-community-health-effects-of-hog-production-in-north-carolina
#6
Virginia T Guidry, Sarah M Rhodes, Courtney G Woods, Devon J Hall, Jessica L Rinsky
Environmental justice means equal access to a healthful environment for all. In North Carolina, many sources of pollution disproportionately affect low-income communities and communities of color. Clinicians who recognize effects of environmental injustices can improve patient care and community health. As an example, we present the effects of industrial-scale hog operations in North Carolina.
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228141/heat-exposure-and-health-impacts-in-north-carolina
#7
Margaret Kovach Sugg
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228140/on-the-front-lines-of-climate-health-effects-in-north-carolina
#8
Lauren Thie, Kimberly Thigpen Tart
Populations across the United States are vulnerable to- and experiencing health effects from-climate change, and North Carolina is no exception. Health professionals are vital when it comes to identifying and treating such impacts, as well as serving as trusted authorities in educating and protecting communities against climate health threats.
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228139/emerging-contaminants-and-environmental-health
#9
A Stanley Meiburg
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228138/safeguarding-children-s-health-time-to-enact-a-health-based-standard-and-comprehensive-testing-mitigation-and-communication-protocol-for-lead-in-drinking-water
#10
Jennifer Hoponick Redmon, Jacqueline MacDonald Gibson, Katherine P Woodward, Anna M Aceituno, Keith E Levine
Lead was a known toxin before the Roman Empire, yet exposure remains a public health concern today. Although there is no safe lead exposure level, a health-based drinking water standard has not been established. The Clean Water for Carolina Kids Study highlights the need for a health-based standard.
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228137/the-unexpected-health-effects-of-air-pollution
#11
David B Peden
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228136/ambient-air-quality-and-cardiovascular-health-translation-of-environmental-research-for-public-health-and-clinical-care
#12
Wayne E Cascio, Thomas C Long
Air pollution is intuitively associated with respiratory effects, but evidence has emerged over the past few decades that the cardiovascular effects of air pollution can be much more adverse and represent a greater public health burden. In this article, we present background on the sources, exposures, and health effects of air pollution and discuss the potential for intervention strategies in the health care system to help reduce individual and population exposure and the attendant risk from the cardiovascular effects of air pollution...
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228135/health-and-the-environment-in-north-carolina
#13
H Kim Lyerly, David B Peden
Environmental impacts on health are usually discussed from a global perspective. However, this issue of the North Carolina Medical Journal focuses on studies of health outcomes in North Carolina caused by local air and water pollution. While some people are clearly at increased risk, environmental threats to health ultimately impact all of us.
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228134/going-way-back-to-the-basics
#14
Peter J Morris
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228133/the-impact-of-coal-powered-electrical-plants-and-coal-ash-impoundments-on-the-health-of-residential-communities
#15
Julia Kravchenko, H Kim Lyerly
BACKGROUND In North Carolina, coal-burning power plants remain the major source of electrical production. Coal burning generates coal ash that is stored in landfills and slurry ponds that are often located near residential communities, signifying high potential for environmental contamination and increasing health risks. We reviewed the literature on potential health effects of coal-burning plants to summarize current knowledge on health risks. METHODS We searched English-language publications issued between January 1, 1987, and December 31, 2017, on PubMed and Google Scholar...
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228132/mortality-and-health-outcomes-in-north-carolina-communities-located-in-close-proximity-to-hog-concentrated-animal-feeding-operations
#16
Julia Kravchenko, Sung Han Rhew, Igor Akushevich, Pankaj Agarwal, H Kim Lyerly
BACKGROUND Life expectancy in southeastern North Carolina communities located in an area with multiple concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) after adjusting for socioeconomic factors remains low. We hypothesized that poor health outcomes in this region may be due to converging demographic, socioeconomic, behavioral, and access-to-care factors and are influenced by the presence of hog CAFOs. METHODS We studied mortality, hospital admissions, and emergency department (ED) usage for health conditions potentially associated with hog CAFOs-anemia, kidney disease, infectious diseases, and low birth weight (LBW)-in North Carolina communities located in zip codes with hog CAFOs (Study group 1), in zip codes with > 215hogs/km2 (Study group 2), and without hog CAFOs (Control group)...
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228131/climate-change-and-public-health-through-the-lens-of-rural-eastern-north-carolina
#17
Gregory D Kearney, Katherine Jones, Ronny A Bell, Marian Swinker, Thomas R Allen
BACKGROUND Recognizing that health outcomes are associated with climate threats is important and requires increased attention by health care providers and policymakers. The primary goal of this report is to provide information related to the public health threats of climate change, while identifying climate-sensitive populations primarily in rural, Eastern North Carolina. METHODS Publicly available data was used to evaluate regional (eg, Eastern, Piedmont, and Western) and county level socio-vulnerability characteristics of population groups in North Carolina, including: percent of persons living in poverty, percent of non-white persons, percent of persons under 18 years living in poverty, percent of elderly people living in poverty, percent of persons with a disability, and number of primary care physicians...
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228130/tar-heel-footprints-in-health-care-dr-bob-parr-takes-the-lead-in-tracking-pollution
#18
Rachel McIntosh-Kastrinsky
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29991624/spotlight-on-the-safety-net-the-mobile-area-health-clinic-addressing-community-needs-through-a-wellness-model
#19
Mari Moss
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29991623/philanthropy-profile-the-cone-health-foundation-expanding-integrated-care-for-the-uninsured
#20
Maggie A Bailey
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
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