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American Naturalist

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731831/toward-a-predictive-framework-for-convergent-evolution-integrating-natural-history-genetic-mechanisms-and-consequences-for-the-diversity-of-life
#1
Anurag A Agrawal
A charm of biology as a scientific discipline is the diversity of life. Although this diversity can make laws of biology challenging to discover, several repeated patterns and general principles govern evolutionary diversification. Convergent evolution, the independent evolution of similar phenotypes, has been at the heart of one approach to understand generality in the evolutionary process. Yet understanding when and why organismal traits and strategies repeatedly evolve has been a central challenge. These issues were the focus of the American Society of Naturalists Vice Presidential Symposium in 2016 and are the subject of this collection of articles...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731830/convergence-and-divergence-in-a-long-term-experiment-with-bacteria
#2
Richard E Lenski
Suitably designed experiments offer the possibility of quantifying evolutionary convergence because the fraction of replicate populations that converge is known. Here I review an experiment with Escherichia coli, in which 12 populations were founded from the same ancestral strain and have evolved for almost 30 years and more than 65,000 generations under the same conditions. The tension between divergence and convergence has been a major focus of this experiment. I summarize analyses of competitive fitness, correlated responses to different environments, cell morphology, the capacity to use a previously untapped resource, mutation rates, genomic changes, and within-population polymorphisms...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731829/pattern-and-process-in-the-comparative-study-of-convergent-evolution
#3
D Luke Mahler, Marjorie G Weber, Catherine E Wagner, Travis Ingram
Understanding processes that have shaped broad-scale biodiversity patterns is a fundamental goal in evolutionary biology. The development of phylogenetic comparative methods has yielded a tool kit for analyzing contemporary patterns by explicitly modeling processes of change in the past, providing neontologists tools for asking questions previously accessible only for select taxa via the fossil record or laboratory experimentation. The comparative approach, however, differs operationally from alternative approaches to studying convergence in that, for studies of only extant species, convergence must be inferred using evolutionary process models rather than being directly measured...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731828/geographical-variation-in-community-divergence-insights-from-tropical-forest-monodominance-by-ectomycorrhizal-trees
#4
Tadashi Fukami, Mifuyu Nakajima, Claire Fortunel, Paul V A Fine, Christopher Baraloto, Sabrina E Russo, Kabir G Peay
Convergence occurs in both species traits and community structure, but how convergence at the two scales influences each other remains unclear. To address this question, we focus on tropical forest monodominance, in which a single, often ectomycorrhizal (EM) tree species occasionally dominates forest stands within a landscape otherwise characterized by diverse communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) trees. Such monodominance is a striking potential example of community divergence resulting in alternative stable states...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731827/convergence-consilience-and-the-evolution-of-temperate-deciduous-forests
#5
Erika J Edwards, David S Chatelet, Bo-Chang Chen, Jin Yao Ong, Shuichiro Tagane, Hironobu Kanemitsu, Kazuki Tagawa, Kentaro Teramoto, Brian Park, Kuo-Fang Chung, Jer-Ming Hu, Tetsukazu Yahara, Michael J Donoghue
The deciduous habit of northern temperate trees and shrubs provides one of the most obvious examples of convergent evolution, but how did it evolve? Hypotheses based on the fossil record posit that deciduousness evolved first in response to drought or darkness and preadapted certain lineages as cold climates spread. An alternative is that evergreens first established in freezing environments and later evolved the deciduous habit. We monitored phenological patterns of 20 species of Viburnum spanning tropical, lucidophyllous (subtropical montane and warm temperate), and cool temperate Asian forests...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731826/convergently-evolved-toxic-secondary-metabolites-in-plants-drive-the-parallel-molecular-evolution-of-insect-resistance
#6
Georg Petschenka, Vera Wagschal, Michael von Tschirnhaus, Alexander Donath, Susanne Dobler
Natural selection imposed by natural toxins has led to striking levels of convergent evolution at the molecular level. Cardiac glycosides represent a group of plant toxins that block the Na,K-ATPase, a vital membrane protein in animals. Several herbivorous insects have convergently evolved resistant Na,K-ATPases, and in some species, convergent gene duplications have also arisen, likely to cope with pleiotropic costs of resistance. To understand the genetic basis and predictability of these adaptations, we studied five independent lineages of leaf-mining flies (Diptera: Agromyzidae)...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731825/convergent-phenotypic-evolution-despite-contrasting-demographic-histories-in-the-fauna-of-white-sands
#7
Erica Bree Rosenblum, Christine E Parent, Eveline T Diepeveen, Clay Noss, Ke Bi
When are evolutionary outcomes predictable? Cases of convergent evolution can shed light on when, why, and how different species exhibit shared evolutionary trajectories. In particular, studying diverse species in a common environment can illuminate how different factors facilitate or constrain adaptive evolution. Here we integrate studies of pattern and process in the fauna at White Sands (New Mexico) to understand the determinants of convergent evolution. Numerous animal species at White Sands exhibit phenotypic convergence in response to a novel-and shared-selective environment: geologically young gypsum dunes...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731824/evolutionary-scenarios-and-primate-natural-history
#8
Harry W Greene
Scenarios summarize evolutionary patterns and processes by interpreting organismal traits and their natural history correlates in a phylogenetic context. They are constructed by (1) describing phenotypes (including physiology and behavior), ideally with attention to formative roles of development, experience, and culture; (2) inferring homologies, homoplasies, ancestral character states, and their transformations with phylogenetic analyses; and (3) integrating those components with ecological and other ancillary data...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731801/diversification-of-trait-combinations-in-coevolving-plant-and-insect-lineages
#9
John N Thompson, Christopher Schwind, Magne Friberg
Closely related species often have similar traits and sometimes interact with the same species. A crucial problem in evolutionary ecology is therefore to understand how coevolving species diverge when they interact with a set of closely related species from another lineage rather than with a single species. We evaluated geographic differences in the floral morphology of all woodland star plant species (Lithophragma, Saxifragaceae) that are pollinated by Greya (Prodoxidae) moths. Flowers of each woodland star species differed depending on whether plants interact locally with one, two, or no pollinating moth species...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731800/natural-history-constrains-the-macroevolution-of-foot-morphology-in-european-plethodontid-salamanders
#10
Dean C Adams, Dana Korneisel, Morgan Young, Annamaria Nistri
The natural history of organisms can have major effects on the tempo and mode of evolution, but few examples show how unique natural histories affect rates of evolution at macroevolutionary scales. European plethodontid salamanders (Plethodontidae: Hydromantes) display a particular natural history relative to other members of the family. Hydromantes commonly occupy caves and small crevices, where they cling to the walls and ceilings. On the basis of this unique and strongly selected behavior, we test the prediction that rates of phenotypic evolution will be lower in traits associated with climbing...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731799/multispecies-coexistence-without-diffuse-competition-or-why-phylogenetic-signal-and-trait-clustering-weaken-coexistence
#11
Simon Maccracken Stump
Related and phenotypically similar species often compete more strongly than unrelated and dissimilar species. Much is unknown about the community-level implications of such complex interactions. Here, we study how they affect community dynamics differently from diffuse interactions (competing equally with all heterospecifics). We derive results for a model that applies to many forms of density dependence and also examine specific cases using a site-occupancy model of forest dynamics. The results indicate that nondiffuse competition produces three effects that will not occur under diffuse competition: first, the central niche effect-if a species has high niche overlap with several competitors, then its average fitness is reduced; second, the common competitor effect-if a species has high niche overlap with more common species, then its average fitness is reduced (these two effects are usually equalizing, because more favorable niches are likely to contain more species and more abundant species); and, finally, the community redistribution effect-when a species falls to low density, the relative abundance of its competitors will change, altering its ability to recover...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731798/most-colorful-example-of-genetic-assimilation-exploring-the-evolutionary-destiny-of-recurrent-phenotypic-accommodation
#12
Alexander V Badyaev, Ahva L Potticary, Erin S Morrison
Evolution of adaptation requires both generation of novel phenotypic variation and retention of a locally beneficial subset of this variation. Such retention can be facilitated by genetic assimilation, the accumulation of genetic and molecular mechanisms that stabilize induced phenotypes and assume progressively greater control over their reliable production. A particularly strong inference into genetic assimilation as an evolutionary process requires a system where it is possible to directly evaluate the extent to which an induced phenotype is progressively incorporated into preexisting developmental pathways...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731797/quantitative-genetic-variation-in-and-environmental-effects-on-pathogen-resistance-and-temperature-dependent-disease-severity-in-a-wild-trout
#13
Paul Vincent Debes, Riho Gross, Anti Vasemägi
Health after pathogen contact varies among individuals because of differences in pathogen load (which is limited by resistance) and disease severity in response to pathogen load (which is limited by tolerance). To understand pathogen-induced host evolution, it is critical to know not only the relative contributions of nongenetic and genetic variation to resistance and tolerance but also how they change environmentally. We quantified nongenetic and genetic variation in parasite load and the associated temperature-dependent disease among trout siblings from two rivers...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731796/bees-without-flowers-before-peak-bloom-diverse-native-bees-find-insect-produced-honeydew-sugars
#14
Joan M Meiners, Terry L Griswold, David J Harris, S K Morgan Ernest
Bee foragers respond to complex visual, olfactory, and extrasensory cues to optimize searches for floral rewards. Their abilities to detect and distinguish floral colors, shapes, volatiles, and ultraviolet signals and even gauge nectar availability from changes in floral humidity or electric fields are well studied. Bee foraging behaviors in the absence of floral cues, however, are rarely considered. We observed 42 species of wild bees visiting inconspicuous, nonflowering shrubs during early spring in a protected Mediterranean habitat...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731795/plant-size-and-competitive-dynamics-along-nutrient-gradients
#15
Deborah E Goldberg, Jason P Martina, Kenneth J Elgersma, William S Currie
Resource competition theory in plants has focused largely on resource acquisition traits that are independent of size, such as traits of individual leaves or roots or proportional allocation to different functions. However, plants also differ in maximum potential size, which could outweigh differences in module-level traits. We used a community ecosystem model called mondrian to investigate whether larger size inevitably increases competitive ability and how size interacts with nitrogen supply. Contrary to the conventional wisdom that bigger is better, we found that invader success and competitive ability are unimodal functions of maximum potential size, such that plants that are too large (or too small) are disproportionately suppressed by competition...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731794/a-neutral-model-for-the-evolution-of-diet-breadth
#16
Matthew L Forister, Stephen H Jenkins
Variation in diet breadth among organisms is a pervasive feature of the natural world that has resisted general explanation. In particular, trade-offs in the ability to use one resource at the expense of another have been expected but rarely detected. We explore a spatial model for the evolution of specialization, motivated by studies of plant-feeding insects. The model is neutral with respect to the causes and consequences of diet breadth: the number of hosts utilized is not constrained by trade-offs, and specialization or generalization does not confer a direct advantage with respect to the persistence of populations or the probability of diversification...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731793/phylogeny-traits-and-biodiversity-of-a-neotropical-bat-assemblage-close-relatives-show-similar-responses-to-local-deforestation
#17
Hannah K Frank, Luke O Frishkoff, Chase D Mendenhall, Gretchen C Daily, Elizabeth A Hadly
If species' evolutionary pasts predetermine their responses to evolutionarily novel stressors, then phylogeny could predict species survival in an increasingly human-dominated world. To understand the role of phylogenetic relatedness in structuring responses to rapid environmental change, we focused on assemblages of Neotropical bats, an ecologically diverse and functionally important group. We examined how taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity shift between tropical forest and farmland. We then explored the importance of evolutionary history by ascertaining whether close relatives share similar responses to environmental change and which species traits might mediate these trends...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731792/the-evolution-of-energetic-scaling-across-the-vertebrate-tree-of-life
#18
Josef C Uyeda, Matthew W Pennell, Eliot T Miller, Rafael Maia, Craig R McClain
Metabolism is the link between ecology and physiology-it dictates the flow of energy through individuals and across trophic levels. Much of the predictive power of metabolic theories of ecology derives from the scaling relationship between organismal size and metabolic rate. There is growing evidence that this scaling relationship is not universal, but we have little knowledge of how it has evolved over macroevolutionary time. Here we develop a novel phylogenetic comparative method to investigate how often and in which clades the macroevolutionary dynamics of the metabolic scaling have changed...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731791/sensory-drive-color-and-color-vision
#19
Trevor D Price
Colors often appear to differ in arbitrary ways among related species. However, a fraction of color diversity may be explained because some signals are more easily perceived in one environment rather than another. Models show that not only signals but also the perception of signals should regularly evolve in response to different environments, whether these primarily involve detection of conspecifics or detection of predators and prey. Thus, a deeper understanding of how perception of color correlates with environmental attributes should help generate more predictive models of color divergence...
August 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731790/the-biased-evolution-of-generation-time
#20
Mélissa Verin, Salomé Bourg, Frédéric Menu, Etienne Rajon
Many life-history traits are important determinants of the generation time. For instance, semelparous species whose adults reproduce only once have shorter generation times than iteroparous species that reproduce on several occasions, assuming equal development duration. A shorter generation time ensures a higher growth rate in stable environments where resources are in excess and is therefore a positively selected feature in this situation. In a stable and limiting environment, all combinations of traits that produce the same number of viable offspring are selectively equivalent...
August 2017: American Naturalist
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