journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

American Naturalist

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351021/coupling-reinforcement-and-speciation
#1
Roger K Butlin, Carole M Smadja
During the process of speciation, populations may diverge for traits and at their underlying loci that contribute barriers to gene flow. These barrier traits and barrier loci underlie individual barrier effects, by which we mean the contribution that a barrier locus or trait-or some combination of barrier loci or traits-makes to overall isolation. The evolution of strong reproductive isolation typically requires the origin of multiple barrier effects. Critically, it also requires the coincidence of barrier effects; for example, two barrier effects, one due to assortative mating and the other due to hybrid inviability, create a stronger overall barrier to gene flow if they coincide than if they distinguish independent pairs of populations...
February 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351020/a-dynamic-state-model-of-migratory-behavior-and-physiology-to-assess-the-consequences-of-environmental-variation-and-anthropogenic-disturbance-on-marine-vertebrates
#2
Enrico Pirotta, Marc Mangel, Daniel P Costa, Bruce Mate, Jeremy A Goldbogen, Daniel M Palacios, Luis A Hückstädt, Elizabeth A McHuron, Lisa Schwarz, Leslie New
Integrating behavior and physiology is critical to formulating new hypotheses on the evolution of animal life-history strategies. Migratory capital breeders acquire most of the energy they need to sustain migration, gestation, and lactation before parturition. Therefore, when predicting the impact of environmental variation on such species, a mechanistic understanding of the physiology of their migratory behavior is required. Using baleen whales as a model system, we developed a dynamic state variable model that captures the interplay among behavioral decisions, energy, reproductive needs, and the environment...
February 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351019/keystone-individuals-alter-ecological-and-evolutionary-consumer-resource-dynamics
#3
Denon Start
Intraspecific variation is central to our understanding of evolution and ecology, but these fields generally consider either the mean trait value or its variance. Alternatively, the keystone individual concept from behavioral ecology posits that a single individual with an extreme phenotype can have disproportionate and irreplaceable effects on group dynamics. Here, I generalize this concept to include nonbehavioral traits and broader ecological and evolutionary dynamics. I test for the effects of individuals with extreme phenotypes on the ecology and evolution of a gall-forming fly and its natural enemies that select for opposite gall sizes...
February 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351018/the-behavior-and-reproductive-physiology-of-a-solitary-progressive-provisioning-vespid-wasp-evidence-for-a-solitary-cycle-origin-of-reproductive-castes
#4
Hans C Kelstrup, Klaus Hartfelder, Tiago Falcon Lopes, Theresa C Wossler
The emergence of queens and workers from solitary antecedents mark a major evolutionary transition in the history of life. The solitary progressive provisioning wasp Synagris cornuta, a member of the subfamily Eumeninae (basal to eusocial vespid wasps), alternates between behavioral states characterized as queenlike and worker-like. Akin to a queen in eusocial wasps, a S. cornuta female initiates construction of a cell into which she oviposits and then, similar to a worker, cares for the brood as it develops...
February 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351017/temperature-dependent-species-interactions-shape-priority-effects-and-the-persistence-of-unequal-competitors
#5
Tess Nahanni Grainger, Adam Ivan Rego, Benjamin Gilbert
The order of species arrival at a site can determine the outcome of competitive interactions when early arrivers alter the environment or deplete shared resources. These priority effects are predicted to be stronger at high temperatures, as higher vital rates caused by warming allow early arrivers to more rapidly impact a shared environment. We tested this prediction using a pair of congeneric aphid species that specialize on milkweed plants. We manipulated temperature and arrival order of the two aphid species and measured aphid population dynamics and milkweed survival and defensive traits...
February 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351016/patterns-of-local-community-composition-are-linked-to-large-scale-diversification-and-dispersal-of-clades
#6
John J Wiens
At any location, a group of organisms may be represented by several clades. What determines which clades will dominate local communities in terms of their species richness? Here, this relatively neglected question is addressed by analyzing 166 local assemblages of snakes distributed globally. For most regions, local assemblages are dominated by clades with higher global-scale diversification rates and more frequent dispersal into each region, and not by clades that have been present in that region longer. This result contrasts with many other studies of local richness (in other organisms), which show strong impacts of regional colonization time on overall local species richness of clades...
February 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351015/temperature-dependent-growth-and-fission-rate-plasticity-drive-seasonal-and-geographic-changes-in-body-size-in-a-clonal-sea-anemone
#7
Will H Ryan
The temperature-size rule is a commonly observed pattern where adult body size is negatively correlated with developmental temperature. In part, this may occur as a consequence of allometric scaling, where changes in the ratio of surface area to mass limit oxygen diffusion as body size increases. As oxygen demand increases with temperature, a smaller body should be favored as temperature increases. For clonal animals, small changes in growth and/or fission rate can rapidly alter the average body size of clonal descendants...
February 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351014/coinfection-timing-drives-host-population-dynamics-through-changes-in-virulence
#8
Katherine M Marchetto, Alison G Power
Infections of one host by multiple parasites are common, and several studies have found that the order of parasite invasion can affect both within-host competition and disease severity. However, it is unclear to what extent coinfection timing might be important to consider when modeling parasite impacts on host populations. Using a model system of two viruses infecting barley, we found that simultaneous infections of the two viruses were significantly more damaging to hosts than sequential coinfections. While priority effects were evident in within-host concentrations of sequential coinfections, priority did not influence any parameters (such as virulence or transmission rate) that affect host population dynamics...
February 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351013/leaf-form-evolution-in-viburnum-parallels-variation-within-individual-plants
#9
Elizabeth L Spriggs, Samuel B Schmerler, Erika J Edwards, Michael J Donoghue
Few studies have critically evaluated how morphological variation within individual organisms corresponds to variation within and among species. Subindividual variation in plants facilitates such studies because their indeterminate modular growth generates multiple serially homologous structures along growing axes. Focusing on leaf form, we evaluate how subindividual trait variation relates to leaf evolution across Viburnum, a clade of woody angiosperms. In Viburnum we infer multiple independent origins of wide/lobed leaves with toothed margins from ancestors with elliptical, smooth-margined leaves...
February 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351012/extreme-climate-induced-life-history-plasticity-in-an-amphibian
#10
François S Becker, Krystal A Tolley, G John Measey, Res Altwegg
Age-specific survival and reproduction are closely linked to fitness and therefore subject to strong selection that typically limits their variability within species. Furthermore, adult survival rate in vertebrate populations is typically less variable over time than other life-history traits, such as fecundity or recruitment. Hence, adult survival is often conserved within a population over time, compared to the variation in survival found across taxa. In stark contrast to this general pattern, we report evidence of extreme short-term variation of adult survival in Rose's mountain toadlet (Capensibufo rosei), which is apparently climate induced...
February 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351011/a-migratory-divide-in-the-painted-bunting-passerina-ciris
#11
C J Battey, Ethan B Linck, Kevin L Epperly, Cooper French, David L Slager, Paul W Sykes, John Klicka
In the painted bunting (Passerina ciris), a North American songbird, populations on the Atlantic coast and interior southern United States are known to be allopatric during the breeding season, but efforts to map connectivity with wintering ranges have been largely inconclusive. Using genomic and morphological data from museum specimens and banded birds, we found evidence of three genetically differentiated painted bunting populations with distinct wintering ranges and molt-migration phenologies. In addition to confirming that the Atlantic coast population remains allopatric throughout the annual cycle, we identified an unexpected migratory divide within the interior breeding range...
February 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351010/using-human-vision-to-detect-variation-in-avian-coloration-how-bad-is-it
#12
Zachary T Bergeron, Rebecca C Fuller
Assessing variation in animal coloration is difficult, as animals differ in their visual system properties. This has led some to propose that human vision can never be used to evaluate coloration, yet many studies have a long history of relying on human vision. To reconcile these views, we compared the reflectance spectra of preserved avian plumage elements with two measures that are human biased: RGB values from digital photographs and the corresponding reflectance spectra from a field guide. We measured 73 plumage elements across 14 bird species...
February 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351009/life-history-traits-evolved-jointly-with-climatic-niche-and-disturbance-regime-in-the-genus-leucadendron-proteaceae
#13
Jeanne Tonnabel, Frank M Schurr, Florian Boucher, Wilfried Thuiller, Julien Renaud, Emmanuel J P Douzery, Ophélie Ronce
Organisms have evolved a diversity of life-history strategies to cope with variation in their environment. Persistence as adults and/or seeds across recruitment events allows species to dampen the effects of environmental fluctuations. The evolution of life cycles with overlapping generations should thus permit the colonization of environments with uncertain recruitment. We tested this hypothesis in Leucadendron (Proteaceae), a genus with high functional diversity native to fire-prone habitats in the South African fynbos...
February 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29244567/temporal-variation-in-predation-risk-may-explain-daily-rhythms-of-foraging-behavior-in-an-orb-weaving-spider
#14
J Colton Watts, Thomas C Jones, Ashley Herrig, Madeleine Miller, Brigitte Tenhumberg
Daily rhythms occur in numerous physiological and behavioral processes across an immense diversity of taxa, but there remain few cases in which mechanistic links between rhythms of trait expression and organismal fitness have been established. We construct a dynamic optimization model to determine whether risk allocation provides an adaptive explanation for the daily foraging rhythm observed in many species using the orb-weaving spider Cyclosa turbinata as a case study. Our model predicts that female C. turbinata should generally start foraging at lower levels of energy reserves (i...
January 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29244566/the-price-equation-gradient-dynamics-and-continuous-trait-game-theory
#15
Jussi Lehtonen
A recent article convincingly nominated the Price equation as the fundamental theorem of evolution and used it as a foundation to derive several other theorems. A major section of evolutionary theory that was not addressed is that of game theory and gradient dynamics of continuous traits with frequency-dependent fitness. Deriving fundamental results in these fields under the unifying framework of the Price equation illuminates similarities and differences between approaches and allows a simple, unified view of game-theoretical and dynamic concepts...
January 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29244565/do-sperm-really-compete-and-do-eggs-ever-have-a-choice-adult-distribution-and-gamete-mixing-influence-sexual-selection-sexual-conflict-and-the-evolution-of-gamete-recognition-proteins-in-the-sea
#16
Don R Levitan
The evolution of gametic compatibility and the effectiveness of compatibility, within and across species, depend on whether sperm from different males directly compete for an egg and whether eggs ever have a choice. Direct sperm competition and egg choice depend on whether sperm from different males arrive at an egg in the brief interval between first sperm contact and fertilization. Although this process may be relevant for all sexually reproducing organisms, it is most easily examined in aquatic external fertilizers...
January 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29244564/2017-american-society-of-naturalists-awards
#17
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29244563/offspring-size-and-reproductive-allocation-in-harvester-ants
#18
Diane C Wiernasz, Blaine J Cole
A fundamental decision that an organism must make is how to allocate resources to offspring, with respect to both size and number. The two major theoretical approaches to this problem, optimal offspring size and optimistic brood size models, make different predictions that may be reconciled by including how offspring fitness is related to size. We extended the reasoning of Trivers and Willard (1973) to derive a general model of how parents should allocate additional resources with respect to the number of males and females produced, and among individuals of each sex, based on the fitness payoffs of each...
January 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29244562/learning-to-cooperate-the-evolution-of-social-rewards-in-repeated-interactions
#19
Slimane Dridi, Erol Akçay
Understanding the behavioral and psychological mechanisms underlying social behaviors is one of the major goals of social evolutionary theory. In particular, a persistent question about animal cooperation is to what extent it is supported by other-regarding preferences-the motivation to increase the welfare of others. In many situations, animals adjust their behaviors through learning by responding to the rewards they experience as a consequence of their actions. Therefore, we may ask whether learning in social situations can be driven by evolved other-regarding rewards...
January 2018: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29244561/mechanisms-of-assortative-mating-in-speciation-with-gene-flow-connecting-theory-and-empirical-research
#20
Michael Kopp, Maria R Servedio, Tamra C Mendelson, Rebecca J Safran, Rafael L Rodríguez, Mark E Hauber, Elizabeth C Scordato, Laurel B Symes, Christopher N Balakrishnan, David M Zonana, G Sander van Doorn
The large body of theory on speciation with gene flow has brought to light fundamental differences in the effects of two types of mating rules on speciation: preference/trait rules, in which divergence in both (female) preferences and (male) mating traits is necessary for assortment, and matching rules, in which individuals mate with like individuals on the basis of the presence of traits or alleles that they have in common. These rules can emerge from a variety of behavioral or other mechanisms in ways that are not always obvious...
January 2018: American Naturalist
journal
journal
25484
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"