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Accident; Analysis and Prevention

Zhuanglin Ma, Honglu Zhang, Steven I-Jy Chien, Jin Wang, Chunjiao Dong
To investigate the relationship between crash frequency and potential influence factors, the accident data for events occurring on a 50km long expressway in China, including 567 crash records (2006-2008), were collected and analyzed. Both the fixed-length and the homogeneous longitudinal grade methods were applied to divide the study expressway section into segments. A negative binomial (NB) model and a random effect negative binomial (RENB) model were developed to predict crash frequency. The parameters of both models were determined using the maximum likelihood (ML) method, and the mixed stepwise procedure was applied to examine the significance of explanatory variables...
October 17, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Yunzhu Meng, Wansoo Pak, Berkan Guleyupoglu, Bharath Koya, F Scott Gayzik, Costin D Untaroiu
Child pedestrian protection deserves more attention in vehicle safety design since they are the most vulnerable road users who face the highest mortality rate. Pediatric Finite Element (FE) models could be used to simulate and understand the pedestrian injury mechanisms during crashes in order to mitigate them. Thus, the objective of the study was to develop a computationally efficient (simplified) six-year-old (6YO-PS) pedestrian FE model and validate it based on the latest published pediatric data. The 6YO-PS FE model was developed by morphing the existing GHBMC adult pedestrian model...
October 16, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Feng Li, Guangxi Wang, Yongjuan Li, Ronggang Zhou
This study aimed to examine the effects of both hindrance and challenge demands on driving anger within the framework of the job demands-resources (JD-R) model. We collected self-reported data from 411 office workers driving to and from work each day in five cities in China. The results from a structural equation modeling analysis indicated that both hindrance and challenge demands were positively related to emotional exhaustion, which was in turn positively correlated with driving anger. Moreover, work engagement was positively correlated with driving anger...
October 16, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Mingxia Huang, Motohiro Fujita, Wisinee Wisetjindawat
This paper presents an analysis of drivers' stopping and traversing behaviors during inter-green periods. Eight intersections were observed in Changchun, China both with and without countdown timers and/or video surveillance during summer and winter. The impacts of the devices on the drivers' behavior were examined and compared between the two seasons from a safety perspective. During winter abrupt braking on icy road can be very dangerous. The analysis was performed by dividing the approach leg into 10m intervals up to 90m upstream from the stop line...
October 14, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
R Dubbeldam, C Baten, J H Buurke, J S Rietman
Older cyclists remain at high risk of sustaining an injury after a fall with their bicycle. A growing awareness for the need and possibilities to support safety of older cyclists has been leading to bicycle design ideas. However, the effectiveness and acceptance of such designs has not been studied yet. This study aims to analyse the effect of 3 support systems: an automatic adjustable saddle height, optimised frame and wheel geometry and drive-off assistance. The support systems are integrated on the SOFIE bicycle, a prototype bicycle designed to support older cyclists during (dis-)mounting and at lower cycling speeds...
October 13, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Blazej Palat, Françoise Paran, Patricia Delhomme
Based on an extended Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB, Ajzen, 1985, 1991), we conducted surveys in order to explain and predict violations at a railroad crossing, among pedestrians (n=153) and car drivers (n=151). Measures were made with respect to three chronologically related railroad crossing situations that varied in risk level. The situations were described in scenarios and depicted on photographs. The participants were recruited in the suburbs of Paris, at two automated railroad crossings with four half-barriers...
October 13, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Milla Niemi, Christer M Rolandsen, Wiebke Neumann, Tuomas Kukko, Raisa Tiilikainen, Jyrki Pusenius, Erling J Solberg, Göran Ericsson
Collisions with wild ungulates are an increasing traffic safety issue in boreal regions. Crashes involving smaller-bodied deer species usually lead to vehicle damage only, whereas collisions with a large animal, such as the moose, increase the risk of personal injuries. It is therefore important to understand both the factors affecting the number of moose-vehicle collisions (MVCs) and the underlying causes that turn an MVC into an accident involving personal injuries or fatalities. As a basis for temporal mitigation measures, we examined the annual and monthly variation of MVCs with and without personal injuries...
October 7, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
John N Ivan, Kevin McKernan, Yaohua Zhang, Nalini Ravishanker, Sha A Mamun
This paper describes a comparison of pedestrian compliance at traffic signals with two types of pedestrian phasing: concurrent, where both pedestrians and vehicular traffic are directed to move in the same directions at the same time, and exclusive, where pedestrians are directed to move during their own dedicated phase while all vehicular traffic is stopped. Exclusive phasing is usually perceived to be safer, especially by senior and disabled advocacy groups, although these safety benefits depend upon pedestrians waiting for the walk signal...
October 7, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Samantha L Schoell, Andrea N Doud, Ashley A Weaver, Jennifer W Talton, Ryan T Barnard, James E Winslow, Joel D Stitzel
BACKGROUND: Occult injuries are not easily detected and can be potentially life-threatening. The purpose of this study was to quantify the perceived occultness of the most frequent motor vehicle crash injuries according to emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. STUDY DESIGN: An electronic survey was distributed to 1,125 EMS professionals who were asked to quantify the likelihood that first responders would miss symptoms related to a particular injury on a 5-point Likert scale...
October 7, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Dimitrios I Tselentis, George Yannis, Eleni I Vlahogianni
The objective of this paper is to provide a review of the most popular and often implemented methodologies related to Usage-based motor insurance (UBI). UBI schemes, such as Pay-as-you-drive (PAYD) and Pay-how-you-drive (PHYD), are a new innovative concept that has recently started to be commercialized around the world. The main idea is that instead of a fixed price, drivers have to pay a premium based on their travel and driving behaviour. Despite the fact that it has been implemented only for a few years, it appears to be a very promising practice with a significant potential impact on traffic safety as well as on traffic congestion mitigation and pollution emissions reduction...
October 7, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Rashmi P Payyanadan, Adam Maus, Fabrizzio A Sanchez, John D Lee, Lillian Miossi, Amsale Abera, Jacob Melvin, Xufan Wang
To reduce exposure to risky and challenging driving situations and prolong mobility and independence, older drivers self-regulate their driving behavior. But self-regulation can be challenging because it depends on drivers' ability to assess their limitations. Studies using self-reports, survey data, and hazard and risk perception tests have shown that driving behavior feedback can help older drivers assess their limitations and adjust their driving behavior. But only limited work has been conducted in developing feedback technology interventions tailored to meet the information needs of older drivers, and the impact these interventions have in helping older drivers self-monitor their driving behavior and risk outcomes...
October 6, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Robert B Noland, Yuhan Zhou
An analysis of state-level data from 1984 to 2014 provides evidence on the relationship between economic recessions and US traffic fatalities. While there are large reductions associated with decreases in household median income, other policy variables tend to have additional and in some cases, larger effects. An increase in the inequality of the income distribution, measured by the Gini index, has reduced traffic fatalities. Graduated licensing policies, cell phone laws, and motorcycle helmet requirements are all associated with reductions in fatalities...
October 5, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Falko Brieger, Robert Hagen, Daniela Vetter, Carsten F Dormann, Ilse Storch
Every year, approximately 500 human fatalities occur due to animal-vehicle collisions in the United States and Europe. Especially heavy-bodied animals affect road safety. For more than 50 years, light-reflecting devices such as wildlife warning reflectors have been employed to alert animals to traffic when crossing roads during twilight and night. Numerous studies addressed the effectiveness of light-reflecting devices in reducing collisions with animals in past decades, but yielded contradictory results. In this study, we conducted a systematic literature review to investigate whether light-reflecting devices contribute to an effective prevention of animal-vehicle collisions...
October 4, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Courtney Coughenour, Sheila Clark, Ashok Singh, Eudora Claw, James Abelar, Joshua Huebner
INTRODUCTION: In the US people of color are disproportionately affected by pedestrian crashes. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential for racial bias in driver yielding behaviors at midblock crosswalks in low and high income neighborhoods located in the sprawling metropolitan area of Las Vegas, NV. METHODS: Participants (1 white, 1 black female) crossed at a midblock crosswalk on a multilane road in a low income and a high income neighborhood. Trained observers recorded (1) number of cars that passed in the nearest lane before yielding while the pedestrian waited near the crosswalk at the curb (2) number of cars that passed through the crosswalk with the pedestrian in the same half of the roadway...
October 4, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Caitlin Northcutt Pope, Tyler Reed Bell, Despina Stavrinos
Performing secondary tasks, such as texting while driving, is associated with an increased risk of motor vehicle collisions (MVCs). While cognitive processes, such as executive function, are involved in driving, little is known about the relationship between executive control and willingness to engage in distracted driving. This study investigated the relationship between age, behavioral manifestations of executive function, and self-reported distracted driving behaviors. Executive difficulty (assessed with the BRIEF-A) as well as demographics (age and gender) was considered as possible predictors of engagement in distracted driving behaviors...
October 4, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Vanessa K Bowden, Shayne Loft, Monica Tatasciore, Troy A W Visser
Speed enforcement reduces incidences of speeding, thus reducing traffic accidents. Accordingly, it has been argued that stricter speed enforcement thresholds could further improve road safety. Effective speed monitoring however requires driver attention and effort, and human information-processing capacity is limited. Emphasizing speed monitoring may therefore reduce resource availability for other aspects of safe vehicle operation. We investigated whether lowering enforcement thresholds in a simulator setting would introduce further competition for limited cognitive and visual resources...
October 4, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Afrid A Sarker, Rajesh Paleti, Sabyasachee Mishra, Mihalis M Golias, Philip B Freeze
Secondary crash (SC) occurrences are major contributors to traffic delay and reduced safety, particularly in urban areas. National, state, and local agencies are investing substantial amount of resources to identify and mitigate secondary crashes to reduce congestion, related fatalities, injuries, and property damages. Though a relatively small portion of all crashes are secondary, determining the primary contributing factors for their occurrence is crucial. The non-recurring nature of SCs makes it imperative to predict their occurrences for effective incident management...
October 4, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Ding-Kuo Chien, Hei-Fen Hwang, Mau-Roung Lin
This study compared the ability of five injury severity measures, namely the Abbreviated Injury Scale to the Head (AIS-H), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE), and Injury Severity Score (ISS), to predict return-to-work after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Furthermore, factors potentially associated with return-to-work were investigated. In total, 207 individuals aged ≤65 years newly diagnosed with a TBI and employed at the time of injury were recruited and followed-up for 1year by telephone every 3 months...
October 4, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Ye Li, Hao Wang, Wei Wang, Lu Xing, Shanwen Liu, Xueyan Wei
Although plenty of studies have been conducted recently about the impacts of cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) system on traffic efficiency, there are few researches analyzing the safety effects of this advanced driving-assistant system. Thus, the primary objective of this study is to evaluate the impacts of the CACC system on reducing rear-end collision risks on freeways. The CACC model is firstly developed, which is based on the Intelligent Driver Model (IDM). Then, two surrogated safety measures, derived from the time-to-collision (TTC), denoting time exposed time-to-collision (TET) and time integrated time-to-collision (TIT), are introduced for quantifying the collision risks...
October 3, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Dibakar Saha, Priyanka Alluri, Albert Gan
The Highway Safety Manual (HSM) presents statistical models to quantitatively estimate an agency's safety performance. The models were developed using data from only a few U.S. states. To account for the effects of the local attributes and temporal factors on crash occurrence, agencies are required to calibrate the HSM-default models for crash predictions. The manual suggests updating calibration factors every two to three years, or preferably on an annual basis. Given that the calibration process involves substantial time, effort, and resources, a comprehensive analysis of the required calibration factor update frequency is valuable to the agencies...
October 1, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
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