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Behavior Therapy

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577591/implementing-clinical-research-using-factorial-designs-a-primer
#1
Timothy B Baker, Stevens S Smith, Daniel M Bolt, Wei-Yin Loh, Robin Mermelstein, Michael C Fiore, Megan E Piper, Linda M Collins
Factorial experiments have rarely been used in the development or evaluation of clinical interventions. However, factorial designs offer advantages over randomized controlled trial designs, the latter being much more frequently used in such research. Factorial designs are highly efficient (permitting evaluation of multiple intervention components with good statistical power) and present the opportunity to detect interactions amongst intervention components. Such advantages have led methodologists to advocate for the greater use of factorial designs in research on clinical interventions (Collins, Dziak, & Li, 2009)...
July 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577590/dialectical-behavior-therapy-group-skills-training-for-bipolar-disorder
#2
Lori Eisner, David Eddie, Rebecca Harley, Michelle Jacobo, Andrew A Nierenberg, Thilo Deckersbach
There is growing evidence that the capacity for emotion regulation is compromised in individuals with bipolar disorder. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), an empirically supported treatment that specifically targets emotion dysregulation, may be an effective adjunct treatment for improving emotion regulation and residual mood symptoms in patients with bipolar disorder. In this open, proof-of-concept pilot study, 37 participants engaged in a 12-week DBT group skills training program, learning mindfulness, emotion regulation, and distress tolerance skills...
July 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577589/prospective-investigation-of-the-contrast-avoidance-model-of-generalized-anxiety-and-worry
#3
Tara A Crouch, Jamie A Lewis, Thane M Erickson, Michelle G Newman
The factors that maintain generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) symptoms and worry over time are not entirely clear. The Contrast Avoidance Model (CAM) postulates that individuals at risk for pathological worry and GAD symptoms uniquely fear emotional shifts from neutral or positive emotions into negative emotional states, and consequently use worry to maintain negative emotion in order to avoid shifts or blunt the effect of negative contrasts. This model has received support in laboratory experiments, but has not been investigated prospectively in the naturalistic context of daily life...
July 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577588/social-anxiety-and-biased-recall-of-positive-information-it-s-not-the-content-it-s-the-valence
#4
Brianne L Glazier, Lynn E Alden
Cognitive theorists hypothesize that individuals with social anxiety are prone to memory biases such that event recall becomes more negative over time. With few exceptions, studies have focused primarily on changes in negative self-judgments. The current study examined whether memory for positive social events is also subject to recall bias. Undergraduate participants (N = 138) engaged in an unexpected public speaking task and received standardized positive or neutral feedback on their performance. They rated their memory of the received feedback following a 5-minute delay and again 1 week later...
July 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577587/criticism-in-the-romantic-relationships-of-individuals-with-social-anxiety
#5
Eliora Porter, Dianne L Chambless, John R Keefe
Social anxiety is associated with difficulties in intimate relationships. Because fear of negative evaluation is a cardinal feature of social anxiety disorder, perceived criticism and upset due to criticism from partners may play a significant role in socially anxious individuals' intimate relationships. In the present study, we examine associations between social anxiety and perceived, observed, and expressed criticism in interactions with romantic partners. In Study 1, we collected self-report data from 343 undergraduates and their romantic partners on social anxiety symptoms, perceived and expressed criticism, and upset due to criticism...
July 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577586/does-the-delivery-of-cbt-for-youth-anxiety-differ-across-research-and-practice-settings
#6
Meghan M Smith, Bryce D McLeod, Michael A Southam-Gerow, Amanda Jensen-Doss, Philip C Kendall, John R Weisz
Does delivery of the same manual-based individual cognitive-behavioral treatment (ICBT) program for youth anxiety differ across research and practice settings? We examined this question in a sample of 89 youths (M age = 10.56, SD = 1.99; 63.70% Caucasian; 52.80% male) diagnosed with a primary anxiety disorder. The youths received (a) ICBT in a research setting, (b) ICBT in practice settings, or (c) non-manual-based usual care (UC) in practice settings. Treatment delivery was assessed using four theory-based subscales (Cognitive-behavioral, Psychodynamic, Client-Centered, Family) from the Therapy Process Observational Coding System for Child Psychotherapy-Revised Strategies scale (TPOCS-RS)...
July 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577585/advancing-personalized-medicine-application-of-a-novel-statistical-method-to-identify-treatment-moderators-in-the-coordinated-anxiety-learning-and-management-study
#7
Andrea N Niles, Amanda G Loerinc, Jennifer L Krull, Peter Roy-Byrne, Greer Sullivan, Cathy D Sherbourne, Alexander Bystritsky, Michelle G Craske
There has been increasing recognition of the value of personalized medicine where the most effective treatment is selected based on individual characteristics. This study used a new method to identify a composite moderator of response to evidence-based anxiety treatment (CALM) compared to Usual Care. Eight hundred seventy-six patients diagnosed with one or multiple anxiety disorders were assigned to CALM or Usual Care. Using the method proposed by Kraemer (2013), 35 possible moderators were examined for individual effect sizes then entered into a forward-stepwise regression model predicting differential treatment response...
July 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577584/computer-informed-and-flexible-family-based-treatment-for-adolescents-a-randomized-clinical-trial-for-at-risk-racial-ethnic-minority-adolescents
#8
Daniel A Santisteban, Sara J Czaja, Sankaran N Nair, Maite P Mena, Alina R Tulloch
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577583/long-term-outcomes-of-cognitive-behavioral-therapy-for-adolescent-body-dysmorphic-disorder
#9
Georgina Krebs, Lorena Fernández de la Cruz, Benedetta Monzani, Laura Bowyer, Martin Anson, Jacinda Cadman, Isobel Heyman, Cynthia Turner, David Veale, David Mataix-Cols
Emerging evidence suggests that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious treatment for adolescent body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in the short term, but longer-term outcomes remain unknown. The current study aimed to follow up a group of adolescents who had originally participated in a randomized controlled trial of CBT for BDD to determine whether treatment gains were maintained. Twenty-six adolescents (mean age = 16.2, SD = 1.6) with a primary diagnosis of BDD received a course of developmentally tailored CBT and were followed up over 12 months...
July 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577582/the-role-of-patient-characteristics-in-the-concordance-of-daily-and-retrospective-reports-of-ptsd
#10
Sarah B Campbell, Marketa Krenek, Tracy L Simpson
Research has documented discrepancies between daily and retrospective reports of psychological symptoms in a variety of conditions. A limited number of studies have assessed these discrepancies in samples of individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with even less research addressing potential covariates that may influence such discrepancies. In the current study, 65 individuals with co-occurring PTSD and alcohol use disorder (AUD) completed daily assessments of their PTSD symptoms for 1 month, followed by a standard retrospective report of PTSD over the same month...
July 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577581/trait-affect-emotion-regulation-and-the-generation-of-negative-and-positive-interpersonal-events
#11
Jessica L Hamilton, Taylor A Burke, Jonathan P Stange, Evan M Kleiman, Liza M Rubenstein, Kate A Scopelliti, Lyn Y Abramson, Lauren B Alloy
Positive and negative trait affect and emotion regulatory strategies have received considerable attention in the literature as predictors of psychopathology. However, it remains unclear whether individuals' trait affect is associated with responses to state positive affect (positive rumination and dampening) or negative affect (ruminative brooding), or whether these affective experiences contribute to negative or positive interpersonal event generation. Among 304 late adolescents, path analyses indicated that individuals with higher trait negative affect utilized dampening and brooding rumination responses, whereas those with higher trait positive affect engaged in rumination on positive affect...
July 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577580/the-role-of-threat-level-and-intolerance-of-uncertainty-iu-in-anxiety-an-experimental-test-of-iu-theory
#12
Mary E Oglesby, Norman B Schmidt
Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) has been proposed as an important transdiagnostic variable within mood- and anxiety-related disorders. The extant literature has suggested that individuals high in IU interpret uncertainty more negatively. Furthermore, theoretical models of IU posit that those elevated in IU may experience an uncertain threat as more anxiety provoking than a certain threat. However, no research to date has experimentally manipulated the certainty of an impending threat while utilizing an in vivo stressor...
July 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390503/randomized-controlled-trial-of-a-computerized-interactive-media-based-problem-solving-treatment-for-depression
#13
Luis R Sandoval, Jay C Buckey, Ricardo Ainslie, Martin Tombari, William Stone, Mark T Hegel
This study evaluated the efficacy of an interactive media-based, computer-delivered depression treatment program (imbPST) compared to a no-treatment control condition (NTC) in a parallel-group, randomized, controlled trial conducted in an outpatient psychiatric research clinic. 45 adult participants with major depressive disorder or dysthymia were randomized to receive either 6 weekly sessions of imbPST or no treatment (No Treatment Control; NTC). The primary outcome measure was the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II)...
May 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390502/an-experimental-investigation-of-co-rumination-problem-solving-and-distraction
#14
Kate J Zelic, Jeffrey A Ciesla, Kelsey S Dickson, Laura C Hruska, Shannon N Ciesla
Co-rumination involves excessive dwelling on negative aspects of problems within a dyadic relationship (Rose, 2002). While research has focused on the tendency to co-ruminate within particular relationships, we were interested in examining the behavior of co-rumination outside the context of a preexisting relationship. Using an experimental manipulation of co-rumination, the primary goal of this study was to experimentally test the effects of co-rumination and examine its associations with negative and positive affectivity...
May 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390501/internet-based-extinction-therapy-for-worry-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#15
Erik Andersson, Erik Hedman, Olle Wadström, Julia Boberg, Emil Yaroslav Andersson, Erland Axelsson, Johan Bjureberg, Timo Hursti, Brjánn Ljótsson
Worry is a common phenotype in both psychiatric patients and the normal population. Worry can be seen as a covert behavior with primary function to avoid aversive emotional experiences. Our research group has developed a treatment protocol based on an operant model of worry, where we use exposure-based strategies to extinguish the catastrophic worry thoughts. The aim of this study was to test this treatment delivered via the Internet in a large-scale randomized controlled trial. We randomized 140 high-worriers (defined as > 56 on the Penn State Worry Questionnaire [PSWQ]) to either Internet-based extinction therapy (IbET) or to a waiting-list condition (WL)...
May 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390500/perfectionism-and-contingent-self-worth-in-relation-to-disordered-eating-and-anxiety
#16
Anna M Bardone-Cone, Stacy L Lin, Rachel M Butler
Perfectionism has been proposed as a transdiagnostic risk factor linked to eating disorders and anxiety. In the current study, we examine domains of contingent self-worth as potential moderators of the relationships between maladaptive perfectionism and disordered eating and anxiety using two waves of data collection. Undergraduate females (N = 237) completed online surveys of the study's core constructs at two points separated by about 14 months. At a bivariate level, maladaptive perfectionism was positively associated with disordered eating and anxiety...
May 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390499/characterizing-interpersonal-difficulties-among-young-adults-who-engage-in-nonsuicidal-self-injury-using-a-daily-diary
#17
Brianna J Turner, Matthew A Wakefield, Kim L Gratz, Alexander L Chapman
Compared to people who have never engaged in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), people with a history of NSSI report multiple interpersonal problems. Theories propose that these interpersonal difficulties play a role in prompting and maintaining NSSI. The cross-sectional nature of most studies in this area limits our understanding of how day-to-day interpersonal experiences relate to the global interpersonal impairments observed among individuals with NSSI, and vice versa. This study compared young adults with (n=60) and without (n=56) recent, repeated NSSI on baseline and daily measures of interpersonal functioning during a 14-day daily diary study...
May 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390498/daily-stress-coping-and-negative-and-positive-affect-in-depression-complex-trigger-and-maintenance-patterns
#18
David M Dunkley, Maxim Lewkowski, Ihno A Lee, Kristopher J Preacher, David C Zuroff, Jody-Lynn Berg, J Elizabeth Foley, Gail Myhr, Ruta Westreich
Major depressive disorder is characterized by emotional dysfunction, but mood states in daily life are not well understood. This study examined complex explanatory models of daily stress and coping mechanisms that trigger and maintain daily negative affect and (lower) positive affect in depression. Sixty-three depressed patients completed perfectionism measures, and then completed daily questionnaires of stress appraisals, coping, and affect for 7 consecutive days. Multilevel structural equation modeling (MSEM) demonstrated that, across many stressors, when the typical individual with depression perceives more criticism than usual, he/she uses more avoidant coping and experiences higher event stress than usual, and this is connected to daily increases in negative affect as well as decreases in positive affect...
May 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390497/social-anxiety-and-social-support-in-romantic-relationships
#19
Eliora Porter, Dianne L Chambless
Little is known about the quality of socially anxious individuals' romantic relationships. In the present study, we examine associations between social anxiety and social support in such relationships. In Study 1, we collected self-report data on social anxiety symptoms and received, provided, and perceived social support from 343 undergraduates and their romantic partners. One year later couples were contacted to determine whether they were still in this relationship. Results indicated that men's social anxiety at Time 1 predicted higher rates of breakup at Time 2...
May 2017: Behavior Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390496/kindling-of-life-stress-in-bipolar-disorder-effects-of-early-adversity
#20
Benjamin G Shapero, Rachel B Weiss, Taylor A Burke, Elaine M Boland, Lyn Y Abramson, Lauren B Alloy
Most theoretical frameworks regarding the role of life stress in bipolar disorders (BD) do not incorporate the possibility of a changing relationship between psychosocial context and episode initiation across the course of the disorder. The kindling hypothesis theorizes that over the longitudinal course of recurrent affective disorders, the relationship between major life stressors and episode initiation declines (Post, 1992). The present study aimed to test an extension of the kindling hypothesis in BD by examining the effect of early life adversity on the relationship between proximal life events and prospectively assessed mood episodes...
May 2017: Behavior Therapy
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