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Journal of Child Language

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29145920/development-of-spanish-rhotics-in-spanish-english-bilingual-children-in-the-united-states
#1
Mandy R Menke
Rhotics, particularly the trill, are late acquired sounds in Spanish. Reports of Spanish-English bilingual preschoolers document age-appropriate articulations, but studies do not explore productions once exposure to English increases. This paper reports on the rhotic productions of a cross-sectional sample of 31 Spanish-English bilingual children, ages 6;8 to 13;5. Children produced taps with high rates of accuracy across age groups; the trill did not reach 80% target production until age 11;3, later than reported for monolingual speakers...
November 17, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29145918/baby-sign-but-not-spontaneous-gesture-predicts-later-vocabulary-in-children-with-down-syndrome-corrigendum
#2
Şeyda Özçalişkan, Lauren B Adamson, Nevena Dimitrova, Jhonelle Bailey, Lauren Schmuck
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 17, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29145915/keeping-it-simple-the-grammatical-properties-of-shared-book-reading
#3
Claire H Noble, Thea Cameron-Faulkner, Elena Lieven
The positive effects of shared book reading on vocabulary and reading development are well attested (e.g., Bus, van Ijzendoorn, & Pellegrini, 1995). However, the role of shared book reading in grammatical development remains unclear. In this study, we conducted a construction-based analysis of caregivers' child-directed speech during shared book reading and toy play and compared the grammatical profile of the child-directed speech generated during the two activities. The findings indicate that (a) the child-directed speech generated by shared book reading contains significantly more grammatically rich constructions than child-directed speech generated by toy play, and (b) the grammatical profile of the book itself affects the grammatical profile of the child-directed speech generated by shared book reading...
November 17, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29143696/from-ah-to-bah-social-feedback-loops-for-speech-sounds-at-key-points-of-developmental-transition
#4
Julie Gros-Louis, Jennifer L Miller
Social feedback is a driving force for speech development. A recent study provided a key finding to explain how contingent responses influence developmental change: infant speech-related vocalizations are contingent on responses to prior speech-related vocalizations (Warlaumont et al., 2014). However, the study did not distinguish between different speech-related vocalizations, vowel-like (V) and consonant-vowel (CV) vocalizations, which is important because CV vocalizations are a precursor to words. The present study explored parents' responses to infants' vocalizations and infants' subsequent vocal production at a point when vocalizations become more like adult speech...
November 16, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29141701/the-roles-of-word-form-frequency-and-phonological-neighbourhood-density-in-the-acquisition-of-lithuanian-noun-morphology
#5
Eglė Savičiūtė, Ben Ambridge, Julian M Pine
Four- and five-year-old children took part in an elicited familiar and novel Lithuanian noun production task to test predictions of input-based accounts of the acquisition of inflectional morphology. Two major findings emerged. First, as predicted by input-based accounts, correct production rates were correlated with the input frequency of the target form, and with the phonological neighbourhood density of the noun. Second, the error patterns were not compatible with the systematic substitution of target forms by either (a) the most frequent form of that noun or (b) a single morphosyntactic default form, as might be predicted by naive versions of a constructivist and generativist account, respectively...
November 16, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29141698/disfluencies-signal-reference-to-novel-objects-for-adults-but-not-children
#6
Sarah J Owens, Justine M Thacker, Susan A Graham
Speech disfluencies can guide the ways in which listeners interpret spoken language. Here, we examined whether three-year-olds, five-year-olds, and adults use filled pauses to anticipate that a speaker is likely to refer to a novel object. Across three experiments, participants were presented with pairs of novel and familiar objects and heard a speaker refer to one of the objects using a fluent ("Look at the ball/lep!") or disfluent ("Look at thee uh ball/lep!") expression. The salience of the speaker's unfamiliarity with the novel referents, and the way in which the speaker referred to the novel referents (i...
November 16, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29125091/how-children-learn-to-produce-appropriate-referring-expressions-in-narratives-the-role-of-clarification-requests-and-modeling
#7
Ana M Carmiol, Danielle Matthews, Odir A Rodríguez-Villagra
Asking children to clarify themselves promotes their ability to uniquely identify objects in referential communication tasks. However, little is known about whether parents ask preschoolers for clarification during interactions and, if so, how. Study 1 explored how mothers clarify their preschoolers' ambiguous descriptions of the characters in their narratives, and whether clarification requests affect children's repairs of their ambiguous descriptions. Mothers were found to use different strategies, including signaling misunderstanding and modeling appropriate descriptions...
November 10, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29125090/distributional-learning-aids-linguistic-category-formation-in-school-age-children
#8
Jessica Hall, Amanda Owen VAN Horne, Thomas Farmer
The goal of this study was to determine if typically developing children could form grammatical categories from distributional information alone. Twenty-seven children aged six to nine listened to an artificial grammar which contained strategic gaps in its distribution. At test, we compared how children rated novel sentences that fit the grammar to sentences that were ungrammatical. Sentences could be distinguished only through the formation of categories of words with shared distributional properties. Children's ratings revealed that they could discriminate grammatical and ungrammatical sentences...
November 10, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29125089/the-development-of-determiners-in-the-context-of-french-english-bilingualism-a-study-of-cross-linguistic-influence
#9
Coralie Hervé, Ludovica Serratrice
This paper reports the preliminary results of a study examining the role of structural overlap, language exposure, and language use on cross-linguistic influence (CLI) in bilingual first language acquisition. We focus on the longitudinal development of determiners in a corpus of two French-English children between the ages of 2;4 and 3;7. The results display bi-directional CLI in the rate of development, i.e., accelerated development in English and a minor delay in French. Unidirectional CLI from English to French was instead observed in the significantly higher rate of ungrammatical determiner omissions in plural and generic contexts than in singular specific contexts in French...
November 10, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29067896/why-do-children-pay-more-attention-to-grammatical-morphemes-at-the-ends-of-sentences
#10
Megha Sundara
Children pay more attention to the beginnings and ends of sentences rather than the middle. In natural speech, ends of sentences are prosodically and segmentally enhanced; they are also privileged by sensory and recall advantages. We contrasted whether acoustic enhancement or sensory and recall-related advantages are necessary and sufficient for the salience of grammatical morphemes at the ends of sentences. We measured 22-month-olds' listening times to grammatical and ungrammatical sentences with third person singular -s...
October 25, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28967352/the-advantage-of-story-telling-children-s-interpretation-of-reported-speech-in-narratives
#11
Franziska Köder, Emar Maier
Children struggle with the interpretation of pronouns in direct speech (Ann said, "I get a cookie"), but not in indirect speech (Ann said that she gets a cookie) (Köder & Maier, 2016). Yet children's books consistently favor direct over indirect speech (Baker & Freebody, 1989). To reconcile these seemingly contradictory findings, we hypothesize that the poor performance found by Köder and Maier (2016) is due to the information-transmission setting of that experiment, and that a narrative setting facilitates children's processing of direct speech...
October 2, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28931450/preschoolers-vocabulary-acquisition-in-chile-the-roles-of-socioeconomic-status-and-quality-of-home-environment
#12
Regina T Lohndorf, Harriet J Vermeer, Rodrigo A Cárcamo, Judi Mesman
Preschoolers' vocabulary acquisition sets the stage for later reading ability and school achievement. This study examined the role of socioeconomic status (SES) and the quality of the home environment of seventy-seven Chilean majority and Mapuche minority families from low and lower-middle-class backgrounds in explaining individual differences in vocabulary acquisition of their three-and-a-half-year-old children. Additionally, we investigated whether the relation between SES and receptive and expressive vocabulary was mediated by the quality of the home environment as the Family Investment Model suggests...
September 21, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28818118/effects-of-age-and-stimulus-material-on-character-introductions-of-swedish-speaking-four-to-six-year-olds
#13
Josefin Lindgren
This study investigates effects of age on character introductions in the oral narratives of seventy-two monolingual Swedish-speaking four- to six-year-olds, comparing results from the Multilingual Assessment Instrument for Narratives (MAIN; Gagarina et al., 2012, 2015), and the Edmonton Narrative Norms Instrument (ENNI; Schneider et al., 2005). The proportion of appropriate referring expressions for introducing story characters clearly increases from age four to six. However, the children's performance is strongly stimulus-dependent...
August 18, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28791944/who-is-the-agent-the-influence-of-pragmatic-leads-on-children-s-reference-assignment-in-non-obligatory-control
#14
Vikki Janke
Non-obligatory control constructions (NOC) are sentences which contain a non-finite clause with a null subject whose reference is determined pragmatically. Little is known about how children assign reference to these subjects, yet this is important as our current understanding of reference-resolution development is limited to less complex sentences with overt elements, such as pronouns. This study explores how seventy-six children (aged six to eleven) consult pragmatic leads when assigning reference in two examples of NOC...
August 9, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28758611/parent-child-conversations-about-literacy-a-longitudinal-observational-study
#15
Rebecca Treiman, Kristina Decker, Sarah Robins, Dina Ghosh, Nicole Rosales
Conversations about literacy-related matters with parents can help prepare children for formal literacy instruction. We studied these conversations using data gathered from fifty-six US families as they engaged in daily activities at home. Analyzing conversations when children were aged 1;10, 2;6, 3;6, and 4;2, we found that explicit talk about the elements and processes of reading and writing occurred even when children were less than two years old and became more common as children grew older. The majority of literacy-related conversations included talk about alphabet letters...
July 31, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28738910/on-line-processing-of-english-which-questions-by-children-and-adults-a-visual-world-paradigm-study
#16
Carla Contemori, Matthew Carlson, Theodoros Marinis
Previous research has shown that children demonstrate similar sentence processing reflexes to those observed in adults, but they have difficulties revising an erroneous initial interpretation when they process garden-path sentences, passives, and wh-questions. We used the visual-world paradigm to examine children's use of syntactic and non-syntactic information to resolve syntactic ambiguity by extending our understanding of number features as a cue for interpretation to which-subject and which-object questions...
July 25, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28724465/visual-speech-fills-in-both-discrimination-and-identification-of-non-intact-auditory-speech-in-children
#17
Susan Jerger, Markus F Damian, Rachel P McAlpine, Hervé Abdi
To communicate, children must discriminate and identify speech sounds. Because visual speech plays an important role in this process, we explored how visual speech influences phoneme discrimination and identification by children. Critical items had intact visual speech (e.g. bæz) coupled to non-intact (excised onsets) auditory speech (signified by /-b/æz). Children discriminated syllable pairs that differed in intactness (i.e. bæz:/-b/æz) and identified non-intact nonwords (/-b/æz). We predicted that visual speech would cause children to perceive the non-intact onsets as intact, resulting in more same responses for discrimination and more intact (i...
July 20, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28720168/infant-statistical-learning-ability-is-related-to-real-time-language-processing
#18
Jill Lany, Amber Shoaib, Abbie Thompson, Katharine Graf Estes
Infants are adept at learning statistical regularities in artificial language materials, suggesting that the ability to learn statistical structure may support language development. Indeed, infants who perform better on statistical learning tasks tend to be more advanced in parental reports of infants' language skills. Work with adults suggests that one way statistical learning ability affects language proficiency is by facilitating real-time language processing. Here we tested whether 15-month-olds' ability to learn sequential statistical structure in artificial language materials is related to their ability to encode and interpret native-language speech...
July 19, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28679455/te-reo-m%C3%A4-ori-indigenous-language-acquisition-in-the-context-of-new-zealand-english
#19
Elaine Reese, Peter Keegan, Stuart McNaughton, Te Kani Kingi, Polly Atatoa Carr, Johanna Schmidt, Jatender Mohal, Cameron Grant, Susan Morton
This study assessed the status of te reo Māori, the indigenous language of New Zealand, in the context of New Zealand English. From a broadly representative sample of 6327 two-year-olds (Growing Up in New Zealand), 6090 mothers (96%) reported their children understood English, and 763 mothers (12%) reported their children understood Māori. Parents completed the new MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory short forms for te reo Māori (NZM: CDI sf) and New Zealand English (NZE: CDI sf). Mothers with higher education levels had children with larger vocabularies in both te reo Māori and NZ English...
July 6, 2017: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28556770/case-assignment-in-english-speaking-children-a-paired-priming-paradigm
#20
Lisa Wisman Weil, Laurence B Leonard
This study employed a paired priming paradigm to ask whether input features influence a child's propensity to use non-nominative versus nominative case in subject position, and to use non-nominative forms even when verbs are marked for agreement. Thirty English-speaking children (ages 2;6 to 3;7) heard sentences with pronouns that had non-contrasting case forms (e.g. Dad hugs it and it hugs Tigger) and it was hypothesized that these forms would lead to more errors (e.g. Him hugs Barney) in an elicited phrase more often than if the children heard contrasting case forms (e...
July 2017: Journal of Child Language
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