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Seminars in Oncology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29580439/response-to-letter-to-the-editor-on-mind-the-gap
#1
LETTER
Scott Metcalfe, Jackie Evans, R Matthew Strother, George Laking, Tony Wang, Steffan Crausaz
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29580438/-mind-the-gap-revisited
#2
John R Zalcberg, Michael Wonder
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29580437/second-line-therapy-in-patients-with-metastatic-castration-resistant-prostate-cancer-with-progression-after-or-under-docetaxel-a-systematic-review-of-nine-randomized-controlled-trials
#3
REVIEW
Michiel H F Poorthuis, Robin W M Vernooij, R Jeroen A van Moorselaar, Theo M de Reijke
Treatment decisions are challenging in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with progression after or under docetaxel. The current review systematically searched the published literature on all treatment options, and assessed the risk of bias and quality of evidence. It found the best available evidence for effective prolongation of overall survival and progression-free survival for abiraterone acetate plus prednisone versus placebo plus prednisone and enzalutamide versus placebo. Other treatment modalities could be beneficial for individual patients by taking into consideration the: selection criteria of the randomized clinical trials, risk of bias, subgroup analyses, and quality of life and adverse events...
October 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29580436/the-surgical-management-of-prostate-cancer
#4
REVIEW
Elisabeth M Sebesta, Christopher B Anderson
Prostate cancer is a heterogeneous disease with a variable natural history. Therefore, optimal management remains challenging. While many men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer may be candidates for active surveillance, there are others who will benefit from aggressive local therapy. Radical prostatectomy is associated with improvements in cancer-specific mortality, metastasis-free survival, and need for palliative treatments when compared with observation in several randomized controlled trials. Additionally, radical prostatectomy may have some oncologic benefit over radiation therapy...
October 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29580435/cell-free-dna-as-a-post-treatment-surveillance-strategy-current-status
#5
REVIEW
Justin M Burgener, Ariana Rostami, Daniel D De Carvalho, Scott V Bratman
Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) consists of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) fragments that are released from tumor cells into the bloodstream. ctDNA harbors cancer-specific genetic and epigenetic alterations that allow its detection and quantification using a variety of emerging techniques. The promise of convenient non-invasive access to the complex and dynamic molecular features of cancer through peripheral blood has galvanized translational researchers around this topic with compelling routes to clinical implementation, particularly in the post-treatment surveillance setting...
October 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29580434/surveillance-imaging-following-treatment-of-head-and-neck-cancer
#6
REVIEW
Xiao Zhao, Shyam Rao
Post-treatment surveillance is an important component in the treatment of head and neck cancers, especially as the proportion of human papilloma virus-positive cancers increases. Early detection of recurrences or second malignancies can increase success and minimize the toxicity of salvage treatment. Unfortunately, there are no consensus guidelines on the frequency and modality of post-treatment imaging. Computed tomography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) all have unique advantages and disadvantages when used as surveillance imaging...
October 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29580433/post-treatment-surveillance-imaging-in-lymphoma
#7
REVIEW
Susan M Hiniker, Richard T Hoppe
Appropriate post-treatment management of patients with lymphoma has been controversial, with imaging frequently performed as post-treatment surveillance. The goal of post-treatment imaging is to identify relapse prior to clinical symptoms, when the burden of disease is lower and the possibility of effective salvage therapy and cure are greater. However, little data exist to support the performance of surveillance imaging after completion of treatment, with the vast majority of studies suggesting there is no clinical benefit to surveillance imaging in asymptomatic patients...
October 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29580432/surveillance-imaging-following-definitive-radiotherapy-for-non-small-cell-lung-cancer-what-is-the-clinical-impact
#8
REVIEW
Brandon A Dyer, Megan E Daly
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Recurrence rates at all stages are high, but evidence-based post-treatment surveillance imaging strategies to detect recurrence are poorly defined, and salvage options are frequently limited. A number of national and international oncology guidelines address post-treatment imaging, but are largely based on low-level, retrospective evidence because of a paucity of high-quality data, particularly in regard to cost-effectiveness and quality-of-life endpoints...
October 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29526259/leveraging-comparative-oncology-in-the-hopes-of-improving-therapies-for-breast-cancer
#9
Chand Khanna
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29526258/comparative-aspects-of-canine-and-human-inflammatory-breast-cancer
#10
REVIEW
Teresa P Raposo, Hugo Arias-Pulido, Nabila Chaher, Steven N Fiering, David J Argyle, Justina Prada, Isabel Pires, Felisbina Luísa Queiroga
Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) in humans is the most aggressive form of mammary gland cancer and shares clinical, pathologic, and molecular patterns of disease with canine inflammatory mammary carcinoma (CIMC). Despite the use of multimodal therapeutic approaches, including targeted therapies, the prognosis for IBC/CIMC remains poor. The aim of this review is to critically analyze IBC and CIMC in terms of biology and clinical features. While rodent cancer models have formed the basis of our understanding of cancer biology, the translation of this knowledge into improved outcomes has been limited...
August 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29526257/bevacizumab-in-breast-cancer-a-targeted-therapy-still-in-search-of-a-target-population
#11
EDITORIAL
Douglas K Marks, Kevin Kalinsky
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29526256/revisiting-the-role-of-bevacizumab-in-the-treatment-of-breast-cancer
#12
REVIEW
Leticia Varella, Jame Abraham, Megan Kruse
Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody directed against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that interferes with VEGF binding to its receptor on vascular endothelium. Bevacizumab has been approved for the treatment of various malignant tumors, and has been studied in combination with several cytotoxic agents in the treatment of breast cancer. In 2008, the US Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval for the use of bevacizumab in combination with weekly paclitaxel for first-line treatment of HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer...
August 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29526255/male-breast-cancer-epidemiology-and-risk-factors
#13
REVIEW
Ali Jad Abdelwahab Yousef
Male breast cancer is a rare malignancy that accounts for less than 1% of all cancers in men and less than 1% of all breast cancers. But the incidence is rising and in some patient groups reaching 15% over the course of their lives. The major risk factors for the development of male breast cancer include advancing age, hormonal imbalance, radiation exposure, and a family history of breast cancer. Regarding the latter, incidence can be linked to mutations in high- or low-penetrance genes. The most relevant risk factor for the development of male breast cancer is a mutation in the BRCA2 gene...
August 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29526254/the-sunshine-act-and-oncology-lessons-learned-from-urology
#14
Mahir Maruf, Piyush K Agarwal, Abhinav Sidana
INTRODUCTION: The Physician Payment Sunshine Act was enacted to increase the transparency of financial relationships between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry. These financial relationships are prevalent in the field of oncology, as they are in other fields of medicine. We explored the relationship between industry and urologists for compensations associated with the treatment of urologic malignancies. METHODS: The publicly available Open Payments database was obtained from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services...
August 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29526253/the-prodigious-network-of-chromosome-17-mirnas-regulating-cancer-genes-that-influence-the-hallmarks-of-cancer
#15
REVIEW
Sarada Achyutuni, Revathy Nadhan, Satheesh Kumar Sengodan, Priya Srinivas
Chromosome 17 (Chr17) harbors crucial genes that encode proteins implicated in a variety of cancers, including some that guard cancer cells from genomic instability and others that interfere with metastasis. Included amongst the genes on chr17 that regulate biological processes fundamental to the genesis of cancer are TP53, BRCA1, CCL5, NF-1, and GRB7. As many as 50% of all human tumors and at least 30% of breast carcinomas contain p53 mutations, while 30%-40% of breast cancers have defective BRCA1. A large number of proteins regulate the expression of these cancer genes on chr17 with miRNAs, the most widely studied class of regulatory RNAs, playing a major role in epigenetically controlling the gene expression programs, thereby managing various cellular functions...
August 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29526252/lamps-shedding-light-on-cancer-biology
#16
REVIEW
Federica Alessandrini, Laura Pezzè, Yari Ciribilli
Lysosomes are important cytoplasmic organelles whose critical functions in cells are increasingly being understood. In particular, despite the long-standing accepted concept about the role of lysosomes as cellular machineries solely assigned to degradation, it has been demonstrated that they play active roles in homeostasis and even in cancer biology. Indeed, it is now well documented that during the process of cellular transformation and cancer progression lysosomes are changing localization, composition, and volume and, through the release of their enzymes, lysosomes can also enhance cancer aggressiveness...
August 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29248136/uncoupling-tumor-stroma-interactions-in-breast-cancer-patients
#17
EDITORIAL
Carole Sourbier, Len Neckers
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29248135/metabolic-symbiosis-in-cancer-and-its-therapeutic-implication
#18
EDITORIAL
Mark R Lipstein, Ipsita Pal, Susan E Bates, Changchun Deng
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29248134/pilot-study-demonstrating-metabolic-and-anti-proliferative-effects-of-in-vivo-anti-oxidant-supplementation-with-n-acetylcysteine-in-breast-cancer
#19
Daniel Monti, Federica Sotgia, Diana Whitaker-Menezes, Madalina Tuluc, Ruth Birbe, Adam Berger, Melissa Lazar, Paolo Cotzia, Rossitza Draganova-Tacheva, Zhao Lin, Marina Domingo-Vidal, Andrew Newberg, Michael P Lisanti, Ubaldo Martinez-Outschoorn
BACKGROUND: High oxidative stress as defined by hydroxyl and peroxyl activity is often found in the stroma of human breast cancers. Oxidative stress induces stromal catabolism, which promotes cancer aggressiveness. Stromal cells exposed to oxidative stress release catabolites such as lactate, which are up-taken by cancer cells to support mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. The transfer of catabolites between stromal and cancer cells leads to metabolic heterogeneity between these cells and increased cancer cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis in preclinical models...
June 2017: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29248133/hodgkin-lymphoma-a-complex-metabolic-ecosystem-with-glycolytic-reprogramming-of-the-tumor-microenvironment
#20
Lekha Mikkilineni, Diana Whitaker-Menezes, Marina Domingo-Vidal, John Sprandio, Paola Avena, Paolo Cotzia, Alina Dulau-Florea, Jerald Gong, Guldeep Uppal, Tingting Zhan, Benjamin Leiby, Zhao Lin, Barbara Pro, Federica Sotgia, Michael P Lisanti, Ubaldo Martinez-Outschoorn
BACKGROUND: Twenty percent of patients with classical Hodgkin Lymphoma (cHL) have aggressive disease defined as relapsed or refractory disease to initial therapy. At present we cannot identify these patients pre-treatment. The microenvironment is very important in cHL because non-cancer cells constitute the majority of the cells in these tumors. Non-cancer intra-tumoral cells, such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been shown to promote tumor growth in cHL via crosstalk with the cancer cells...
June 2017: Seminars in Oncology
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