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Seminars in Oncology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899195/the-future-of-clinical-cancer-genomics
#1
Kenneth Offit
The current and future applications of genomics to the practice of preventive oncology are being impacted by a number of challenges. These include rapid advances in genomic science and technology that allow massively parallel sequencing of both tumors and the germline, a diminishing of intellectual property restrictions on diagnostic genetic applications, rapid expansion of access to the internet which includes mobile access to both genomic data and tools to communicate and interpret genetic data in a medical context, the expansion of for-profit diagnostic companies seeking to monetize genetic information, and a simultaneous effort to depict medical professionals as barriers to rather than facilitators of understanding one's genome...
October 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899194/strategies-for-clinical-implementation-of-screening-for-hereditary-cancer-syndromes
#2
REVIEW
Brandie Heald, Jessica Marquard, Pauline Funchain
Hereditary cancer syndromes generally account for 5%-10% of malignancies. While these syndromes are rare, affected patients carry significantly elevated risks of developing cancer, as do their at-risk relatives. Identification of these patients is critical to ensure timely and appropriate genetic testing relevant to cancer patients and their relatives. Several guidelines and tools are available to assist clinicians. Patients suspected to have hereditary cancer syndromes should be offered genetic testing in the setting of genetic counseling by a qualified genetics professional...
October 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899193/genetic-predisposition-to-leukemia-and-other-hematologic-malignancies
#3
REVIEW
Simone Feurstein, Michael W Drazer, Lucy A Godley
In this review, we provide an overview of familial myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)/acute leukemia (AL) and bone marrow failure syndromes, as well as insights into familial myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), familial multiple myeloma (MM), familial Waldenstr├Âm macroglobulinemia (WM), familial lymphoma, and cancer predisposition syndromes with increased risk of MDS/AL. This field will continue to accelerate as next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques identify novel predisposition alleles in families with a genetic predisposition to hematologic malignancies...
October 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899192/genetic-predisposition-to-melanoma
#4
REVIEW
Jason E Hawkes, Amanda Truong, Laurence J Meyer
Malignant melanoma is a rare, often fatal form of skin cancer with a complex multigenic etiology. The incidence of melanoma is increasing at an alarming rate. A number of heritable factors contribute to a patient's overall melanoma risk, including response to ultraviolet light, nevus number, and pigmentation characteristics, such as eye and hair color. Approximately 5%-10% of melanoma cases are familial, yet the majority of familial cases lack identifiable germ-line mutations in known susceptibility genes. Additionally, most familial melanomas lack germ-line mutations in genes that are commonly mutated in sporadic melanoma...
October 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899191/genetic-predisposition-to-endocrine-tumors-diagnosis-surveillance-and-challenges-in-care
#5
REVIEW
Elisabeth Joye Petr, Tobias Else
Endocrine tumor syndromes, eg, multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 and 2, were among the first recognized hereditary predisposition syndromes to tumor development. Over time, the number of endocrine tumor syndromes has significantly expanded, eg, with the recent inclusion of hereditary paraganglioma syndromes. Associations of non-endocrine tumors with hereditary endocrine tumor syndromes and endocrine tumors with non-classical endocrine tumor syndromes have emerged. These findings have certainly expanded the scope of care, necessitating a multidisciplinary approach by a team of medical professionals and researchers, integrating shared patient decision-making at every step of surveillance, diagnosis, and treatment...
October 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899190/genetic-changes-associated-with-testicular-cancer-susceptibility
#6
REVIEW
Louise C Pyle, Katherine L Nathanson
Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is a highly heritable cancer primarily affecting young white men. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been particularly effective in identifying multiple common variants with strong contribution to TGCT risk. These loci identified through association studies have implicated multiple genes as associated with TGCT predisposition, many of which are unique among cancer types, and regulate processes such as pluripotency, sex specification, and microtubule assembly. Together these biologically plausible genes converge on pathways involved in male germ cell development and maturation, and suggest that perturbation of them confers susceptibility to TGCT, as a developmental defect of germ cell differentiation...
October 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899189/genetic-predisposition-to-kidney-cancer
#7
REVIEW
Laura S Schmidt, W Marston Linehan
Kidney cancer is not a single disease but is made up of a number of different types of cancer classified by histology that are disparate in presentation, clinical course, and genetic basis. Studies of families with inherited renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have provided the basis for our understanding of the causative genes and altered metabolic pathways in renal cancer with different histologies. Von Hippel-Lindau disease was the first renal cancer disorder with a defined genetic basis. Over the next two decades, the genes responsible for a number of other inherited renal cancer syndromes including hereditary papillary renal carcinoma, Birt-Hogg-Dube┬┤syndrome, hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma, and succinate dehydrogenase-associated renal cancer were identified...
October 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899188/familial-prostate-cancer
#8
Veda N Giri, Jennifer L Beebe-Dimmer
Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among men in the United States as well as most Western countries. A significant proportion of men report having a positive family history of prostate cancer in a first-degree relative (father, brother, son), which is important in that family history is one of the only established risk factors for the disease and plays a role in decision-making for prostate cancer screening. Familial aggregation of prostate cancer is considered a surrogate marker of genetic susceptibility to developing the disease, but shared environment cannot be excluded as an explanation for clustering of cases among family members...
October 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899187/genetic-predisposition-to-gastric-cancer
#9
REVIEW
Iva Petrovchich, James M Ford
Gastric cancer ranks as the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide and confers a 5-year survival of 20%. While most gastric cancers are sporadic, ~1%-3% can be attributed to inherited cancer predisposition syndromes. Germline E-cadherin/CDH1 mutations have been identified in families with an autosomal dominant inherited predisposition to diffuse gastric cancer. The cumulative risk of gastric cancer for CDH1 mutation carriers by age 80 years is reportedly 70% for men and 56% for women. Female mutation carriers also have an estimated 42% risk for developing lobular breast cancer by age 80 years...
October 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899186/familial-pancreatic-cancer
#10
REVIEW
Gloria M Petersen
Familial pancreatic cancer (FPC) includes those kindreds that contain at least two first-degree relatives with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. At least 12 known hereditary syndromes or genes are associated with increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer, the foremost being BRCA2 and CDKN2A. Research into the identification of mutations in known cancer predisposition genes and through next-generation sequencing has revealed extensive heterogeneity. The development of genetic panel testing has enabled genetic risk assessment and predisposition testing to be routinely offered...
October 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899185/genetic-predisposition-in-gynecologic-cancers
#11
REVIEW
Molly S Daniels, Karen H Lu
This review article discusses the diagnosis and management of hereditary ovarian cancer and hereditary uterine cancer. The key recommendations highlighted are: All women with high grade non-mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer should be offered at least BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic testing. The care of women with BRCA-associated ovarian cancer should be tailored to their mutation status. Risk-reducing bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is recommended for women with BRCA1/2 mutations. Women with endometrial cancer should be assessed for the possibility of Lynch syndrome...
October 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899184/genetic-predisposition-to-colorectal-cancer-implications-for-treatment-and-prevention
#12
REVIEW
Elena M Stoffel, Matthew B Yurgelun
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosed in men and women and approximately 5% of cases are associated with identifiable germline mutations associated with hereditary cancer syndromes. Lifetime risks for CRC can approach 50%-80% for mutation carriers in the absence of endoscopic and/or surgical intervention, and early identification of at-risk individuals can guide clinical interventions for cancer prevention and treatment. Personal and family history and molecular phenotype of CRC tumors are used in determining which patients should be referred for clinical genetic evaluation...
October 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899183/updates-on-breast-cancer-genetics-clinical-implications-of-detecting-syndromes-of-inherited-increased-susceptibility-to-breast-cancer
#13
REVIEW
Erin F Cobain, Kara J Milliron, Sofia D Merajver
Since the initial discovery that pathogenic germline alterations in BRCA 1/2 increase susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer, many additional genes have now been discovered that also increase breast cancer risk. Given that several more genes have now been implicated in hereditary breast cancer syndromes, there is increased clinical use of multigene panel testing to evaluate patients with a suspected genetic predisposition to breast cancer. While this is most certainly a cost-effective approach, broader testing strategies have resulted in a higher likelihood of identifying moderate-penetrance genes, for which management guidelines regarding breast cancer risk reduction have not been firmly established...
October 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899182/advances-in-inherited-cancers-introduction
#14
EDITORIAL
Elena M Stoffel, Kathleen A Cooney
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27663484/functional-crosstalk-between-wnt-signaling-and-tyrosine-kinase-signaling-in-cancer-seminars-in-oncology-vol-42-no-6-december-2015-pp-820-831
#15
Jamie N Anastas
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27663483/pharmacodynamic-endpoints-as-clinical-trial-objectives-to-answer-important-questions-in-oncology-drug-development
#16
Ralph E Parchment, James H Doroshow
Analyzing the molecular interplay between malignancies and therapeutic agents is rarely a straightforward process, but we hope that this special issue of Seminars has highlighted the clinical value of such endeavors as well as the relevant theoretical and practical considerations. Here, we conclude with both an overview of the various high-value applications of clinical pharmacodynamics (PD) in developmental therapeutics and an outline of the framework for incorporating PD analyses into the design of clinical trials...
August 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27663482/immuno-pharmacodynamics-for-evaluating-mechanism-of-action-and-developing-immunotherapy-combinations
#17
REVIEW
Ralph E Parchment, Andrea Regier Voth, James H Doroshow, Jay A Berzofsky
Immunotherapy has become a major modality of cancer treatment, with multiple new classes of immunotherapeutics recently entering the clinic and obtaining market approval from regulatory agencies. While the promise of these therapies is great, so is the number of possible combinations not only with each other but also with small molecule therapeutics. Furthermore, the observation of unusual dose-response relationships suggests a critical dependency of drug effectiveness on the dosage regimen (dose and schedule)...
August 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27663481/pharmacodynamic-analyses-in-a-multi-laboratory-network-lessons-from-the-poly-adp-ribose-assay
#18
REVIEW
Katherine V Ferry-Galow, Jiuping Ji, Robert J Kinders, Yiping Zhang, R Kenneth Czambel, John C Schmitz, Josef Herzog, Yvonne A Evrard, Ralph E Parchment
Clinical pharmacodynamic assays need to meet higher criteria for sensitivity, precision, robustness, and reproducibility than those expected for research-grade assays because of the long duration of clinical trials and the potentially unpredictable number of laboratories running the assays. This report describes the process of making an immunoassay based on commercially available reagents "clinically ready". The assay was developed to quantify poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) levels as a marker of PAR polymerase inhibitor activity for a proof-of-concept phase 0 clinical trial at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and subsequent clinical trials...
August 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27663480/the-root-causes-of-pharmacodynamic-assay-failure
#19
REVIEW
Katherine V Ferry-Galow, Hala R Makhlouf, Deborah F Wilsker, Scott M Lawrence, Thomas D Pfister, Allison M Marrero, Kristina M Bigelow, William H Yutzy, Jiuping J Ji, Donna O Butcher, Brad A Gouker, Shivaani Kummar, Alice P Chen, Robert J Kinders, Ralph E Parchment, James H Doroshow
Robust pharmacodynamic assay results are valuable for informing go/no-go decisions about continued development of new anti-cancer agents and for identifying combinations of targeted agents, but often pharmacodynamic results are too incomplete or variable to fulfill this role. Our experience suggests that variable reagent and specimen quality are two major contributors to this problem. Minimizing all potential sources of variability in procedures for specimen collection, processing, and assay measurements is essential for meaningful comparison of pharmacodynamic biomarkers across sample time points...
August 2016: Seminars in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27663479/using-reverse-phase-protein-arrays-as-pharmacodynamic-assays-for-functional-proteomics-biomarker-discovery-and-drug-development-in-cancer
#20
REVIEW
Yiling Lu, Shiyun Ling, Apurva M Hegde, Lauren A Byers, Kevin Coombes, Gordon B Mills, Rehan Akbani
The majority of the targeted therapeutic agents in clinical use target proteins and protein function. Although DNA and RNA analyses have been used extensively to identify novel targets and patients likely to benefit from targeted therapies, these are indirect measures of the levels and functions of most therapeutic targets. More importantly, DNA and RNA analysis is ill-suited for determining the pharmacodynamic effects of target inhibition. Assessing changes in protein levels and function is the most efficient way to evaluate the mechanisms underlying sensitivity and resistance to targeted agents...
August 2016: Seminars in Oncology
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