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Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28792799/investigating-associations-between-proliferation-indices-c-kit-and-lymph-node-stage-in-canine-mast-cell-tumors
#1
Erika Lauren Krick, Matti Kiupel, Amy C Durham, Tuddow Thaiwong, Dorothy C Brown, Karin U Sorenmo
Previous studies have evaluated cellular proliferation indices, KIT expression, and c-kit mutations to predict the clinical behavior of canine mast cell tumors (MCTs). The study purpose was to retrospectively compare mitotic index, argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs)/nucleus, Ki-67 index, KIT labeling pattern, and internal tandem duplication mutations in c-KIT between stage I and stage II grade II MCTs. Medical records and tumor biopsy samples from dogs with Grade II MCTs with cytological or histopathological regional lymph node evaluation were included...
August 9, 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28792798/cholecystopexy-and-pericardial-pseudocyst-removal-in-a-dog-with-a-congenital-peritoneopericardial-diaphragmatic-hernia
#2
Quentin Cabon, Eric Norman Carmel, Julien Cabassu
A 4 mo old spayed female golden retriever was presented with a peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH) that was diagnosed during neutering. Echocardiography revealed a fluid-filled structure and parts of the liver in the pericardial cavity. Computed tomography confirmed the existence of the PPDH and the herniation of the right medial liver lobe and the gallbladder. Cystic masses were observed in the pericardial and the peritoneal cavities, possibly communicating through the PPDH. A median laparotomy revealed a single lobulated cystic lesion extending into both the pericardial and peritoneal cavities through the PPDH...
August 9, 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28792797/magnetic-resonance-imaging-and-clinical-findings-associated-with-choroid-plexus-spinal-cord-drop-metastases
#3
Carmen L Yeamans, Rodrigo Gutierrez-Quintana, Allison Haley, Catherine G Lamm
A 5 yr old castrated male whippet presented with a unique presentation of ambulatory paraparesis and subsequent diagnosis of primary intracranial choroid plexus carcinoma, with metastases to the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral spinal cord segments. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed initially of the thoracolumbar vertebral column and was followed by MRI sequences of the brain for confirmation of the presence of a primary intracranial tumor. The dog was euthanized immediately following diagnostic imaging due to the severity of clinical signs and poor prognosis...
August 9, 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28792796/clinical-response-and-side-effects-associated-with-testosterone-cypionate-for-urinary-incontinence-in-male-dogs
#4
Jean-S├ębastien Palerme, Allison Mazepa, Rae G Hutchins, Vincent Ziglioli, Shelly L Vaden
Urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) is reported much more seldom in male dogs than in female dogs. The few existing reports evaluating the efficacy of medical therapy in controlling USMI in males have demonstrated limited success. In this case series, we report the effect of testosterone cypionate, given at a median dose of 1.5 mg/kg intramuscularly every 4 wk, in eight male dogs with USMI. Response was evaluated through the review of medical records and telephone interviews with the clients. Based on owners' assessments, a good to excellent response was reported in three of eight dogs (38%), a slight response was reported in one of eight dogs (12%), and a poor response was reported in four of eight dogs (50%)...
August 9, 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28792795/diphallia-in-a-mixed-breed-puppy-case-report
#5
Rebecca Laube, Alysa Cook, Kevin Winkler
An 8 mo old intact male mixed-breed dog presented for diphallia with paraphimosis of the nonfunctional, accessory penis. Bloodwork, an abdominal ultrasound, and a positive contrast retrograde urethrogram were performed and revealed no other structural abnormalities. Surgical excision of the accessory penis was elected. This is one of three reported cases of diphallia in the dog in the English literature, but this is the only case in which no other congenital abnormalities were identified. The authors also review diphallia in both the veterinary and human literature...
August 9, 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28792794/squamous-cell-carcinoma-of-the-penis-with-pulmonary-metastasis-and-paraneoplastic-hypertrophic-osteopathy-in-a-dog
#6
Victoria Jenkins, Carlos Henrique de Mello Souza, Louis-Phillippe de Lorimier, Evandro de Toledo-Piza
Squamous cell carcinoma of the penis was diagnosed by incisional biopsy of a penile mass in a 12 yr old intact male beagle dog presenting with hemorrhagic discharge from the prepuce. Penile amputation, orchiectomy with scrotal ablation, and scrotal urethrostomy were performed. Hypertrophic osteopathy secondary to pulmonary metastatic disease occurred 10 mo after the surgery. Palliative treatment with piroxicam was administered and led to complete resolution of the clinical signs of the pain. Sixteen months following surgery, the dog presented with significant dyspnea and anorexia and was euthanized due to poor prognosis...
August 9, 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28792793/effect-of-cricoarytenoid-joint-preservation-and-suture-tension-on-arytenoid-lateralization
#7
Elizabeth Davis, Brenda Salinardi, Jason Spina, Claire Sharp
The objective of this experimental study was to evaluate the effects of cricoarytenoid (CA) joint preservation versus disarticulation on rima glottidis (RG) area with the epiglottis open and closed under both low and high suture tension. Canine cadaver larynges were used. A unilateral arytenoid lateralization (UAL) was performed with low or high suture tension and with the CA joint preserved or disarticulated. Rima glottidis area was measured with the epiglottis in an open and closed position. Results indicated that RG area was increased over baseline when UAL was performed with both low and high suture tension when the epiglottis was in an open position...
August 9, 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28535138/paramedian-submandibular-approach-for-removal-of-foreign-bodies-in-the-pterygoid-muscle-in-two-dogs
#8
Elizabeth Gettinger, Daniel Smeak, Angela Marolf
The purpose of this report is to document a unique location of an oropharyngeal foreign body, diagnosed via contrast computed tomography (CT), as well as a novel surgical approach to the pterygoid muscle region. Oropharyngeal foreign objects are an uncommon but potentially serious disease that can lead to chronic abscessation and pain. Two dogs were presented with chronic complaints, including pain and inability to fully open the mouth for a 1 yr and 5 mo duration, respectively. There was no history or evidence of skin sinus or submandibular/cervical swelling on physical examination of either dog...
May 23, 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28535137/the-effect-of-heart-disease-on-anesthetic-complications-during-routine-dental-procedures-in-dogs
#9
Jennifer E Carter, Alison A Motsinger-Reif, William V Krug, Bruce W Keene
Dental procedures are a common reason for general anesthesia, and there is widespread concern among veterinarians that heart disease increases the occurrence of anesthetic complications. Anxiety about anesthetizing dogs with heart disease is a common cause of referral to specialty centers. To begin to address the potential effect of heart disease on anesthetic complications in dogs undergoing anesthesia for routine dental procedures, we compared anesthetic complications in 100 dogs with heart disease severe enough to trigger referral to a specialty center (cases) to those found in 100 dogs without cardiac disease (controls) that underwent similar procedures at the same teaching hospital...
May 23, 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28535136/eosinophilic-esophagitis-in-a-kitten
#10
Julie Pera, Douglas Palma, Taryn A Donovan
A 4 mo old intact male kitten was presented for chronic regurgitation and failure to thrive after weaning to dry food. Esophageal dilatation and severe diffuse proliferative lesions of the esophageal mucosa were found via radiography and esophagoscopy, respectively. Histopathologic examination revealed severe, chronic, diffuse, hyperplastic eosinophilic and mastocytic esophagitis. Eosinophilic infiltrates were prominent, with a mean of 29.8 eosinophils per high power field, supportive of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE)...
May 23, 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28535135/recovery-from-cyclophosphamide-overdose-in-a-dog
#11
Jessica Renee Finlay, Kenneth Wyatt, Courtney North
An adult female spayed dog was evaluated after inadvertently receiving a total dose of 1,750 mg oral cyclophosphamide, equivalent to 2,303 mg/m(2), over 21 days (days -21 to 0). Nine days after the last dose of cyclophosphamide (day +9), the dog was evaluated at Perth Veterinary Specialists. Physical examination revealed mucosal pallor, a grade 2/6 systolic heart murmur, and severe hemorrhagic cystitis. Severe nonregenerative pancytopenia was detected on hematology. Broad spectrum antibiotics, two fresh whole blood transfusions, granulocyte colony stimulating factor, and tranexamic acid were administered...
May 23, 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28535134/upper-airway-obstruction-secondary-to-anticoagulant-rodenticide-toxicosis-in-five-dogs
#12
Corinne Lawson, Mauria O'Brien, Maureen McMichael
Five dogs were presented with clinical signs compatible with upper airway obstruction, including stridor, stertor, coughing, gagging, and varying degrees of respiratory distress. All dogs had radiographic findings of soft tissue opacity in the area of the pharynx, larynx, or trachea, and several had narrowing of the tracheal lumen. Coagulation abnormalities (prolonged prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time) were present in the four dogs that underwent testing. Four of five dogs were treated for the coagulopathy, presumably due to anticoagulant rodenticide toxicosis, and survived to discharge...
May 23, 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28535133/impression-smear-agreement-with-acetate-tape-preparation-for-cytologic-sampling
#13
Elizabeth A Layne, Sonja Zabel
Cutaneous cytologic sampling techniques are used to detect bacteria, yeast, and inflammatory cells for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring. Studies have examined slide evaluation techniques, ear swab cytology staining methods, and observer variations; few studies compare common clinical sampling techniques. The primary aim of this study was to measure detection of microorganisms and neutrophils by impression smear compared to acetate tape preparation; comparison of agreement between two acetate tape staining methods was a secondary aim...
May 23, 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28535132/granulomatous-inflammatory-response-to-a-microchip-implanted-in-a-dog-for-eight-years
#14
Claire Legallet, Kelley Thieman Mankin, Kathy Spaulding, Joanne Mansell
An 8 yr old neutered male springer spaniel dog was referred to Texas A&M University, College of Veterinary Medicine for a large, firm, fixed mass, located in the dorsal cervical tissue. The dog was otherwise healthy and had undergone microchip implantation approximately 8 yr prior. Radiographs, ultrasound, and microchip scanner confirmed the presence of a microchip within the mass. The microchip and associated mass were surgically excised, and histopathologic examination revealed granulomatous inflammation surrounding a cracked microchip...
May 23, 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28535131/detection-of-deafness-in-puppies-using-a-hand-held-otoacoustic-emission-screener
#15
Michael H Sims, Erin Plyler, Ashley Harkrider, Karen McLucas
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of a hand-held otoacoustic emissions screener to detect deafness in puppies. Specifically, distortion product otoacoustic emissions were recorded from 34 puppies (both sexes) of a variety of breeds, from 6-10 wk of age, and the results were compared to brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAER) recorded from the same puppies. Recordings were obtained from both ears in awake or lightly anesthetized puppies, and the results from each ear were compared. In all 62 ears that had normal BAERs, the distortion product otoacoustic emissions screener gave a response of "Pass...
May 23, 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28291400/effect-of-variations-in-stent-placement-on-outcome-of-endoluminal-stenting-for-canine-tracheal-collapse
#16
Stephanie Rosenheck, Garrett Davis, Carl D Sammarco, Richard Bastian
The study's objective was to determine effects of relative size and placement location of endoluminal stents on incidence of complications and survival for canine tracheal collapse. Measurements were obtained on lateral radiographs before and after stenting to determine percent of the trachea occupied by the stent. These values were monitored over time and compared to complication rates and survival. Overall median survival time was 502 days. Six month survival rate was 78%, 1 yr survival was 60%, and 2 yr survival was 26%...
May 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28291399/resection-and-primary-closure-of-edematous-glossoepiglottic-mucosa-in-a-dog-causing-laryngeal-obstruction
#17
Kevin J Schabbing, Jeffrey A Seaman
An approximately 22 mo old male neutered English bulldog was evaluated for acute onset of dyspnea with suspected brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS). Laryngoscopic exam revealed diffuse, severe edema and static displacement of redundant glossoepiglottic (GE) mucosa causing complete obstruction of the larynx and epiglottic entrapment. Static displacement of the GE mucosa was observed and determined to be the overriding component of dyspnea in this patient with BOAS. Resection and primary closure with two separate, simple continuous sutures of the GE mucosa were performed...
May 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28291398/periodontal-therapy-in-dogs-using-bone-augmentation-products-marketed-for-veterinary-use
#18
Molly Angel
Periodontal disease is extremely common in companion animal practice. Patients presenting for a routine oral examination and prophylaxis may be found to have extensive periodontal disease and attachment loss. Vertical bone loss is a known sequela to periodontal disease and commonly involves the distal root of the mandibular first molar. This case report outlines two dogs presenting for oral examination and prophylaxis with general anesthesia. Both patients did not have any clinical symptoms of periodontal disease other than halitosis...
May 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28291397/evaluation-of-the-impacts-of-epilepsy-in-dogs-on-their-caregivers
#19
Julie A Nettifee, Karen R Munana, Emily H Griffith
Epilepsy is a common problem in dogs, and management of this chronic disorder requires a substantial commitment on the part of the pet owner. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of epilepsy in dogs on their owners, utilizing an online survey tool. A questionnaire was developed to explore a variety of factors, including seizure history, treatment, outcome, quality of life, costs associated with therapy, and sources of support. A total of 225 responses were obtained. The majority of respondents reported positive scores for overall quality of life, although scores were significantly lower for dogs with poorly controlled epilepsy and medication-related adverse effects...
May 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28291396/mandibular-reconstruction-by-using-a-liquid-nitrogen-treated-autograft-in-a-dog-with-an-oral-tumor
#20
Yasuhiko Okamura, Kazuki Heishima, Tomoki Motegi, Jun Sasaki, Masanobu Goryo, Hideji Nishida, Hiroyuki Tsuchiya, Masaaki Katayama, Yuji Uzuka
A 10 yr old intact female German shepherd dog presented with a large peripheral odontogenic fibroma and malignant melanoma on her lower jaw. The tumor was resected with a unilateral subtotal rostral hemimandibulectomy. After the mandible was removed, it was devitalized intraoperatively by freezing it in liquid nitrogen. It was subsequently reimplanted. New bone tissue formed in the gap between the frozen bone and the host bone. The regenerated bone contained osteocytes, osteoblasts, and blood vessels. The cosmetic appearance of the dog was preserved...
May 2017: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
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