journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29024366/tethyan-changes-shaped-aquatic-diversification
#1
Zhonge Hou, Shuqiang Li
The Tethys Ocean existed between the continents of Gondwana and Laurasia from the Triassic to the Pliocene. Analyses of multiple biogeographic and phylogenetic histories reveal that the subsequent breakup of the Tethys greatly influenced the distributions of many species. The ancestral Tethyan realm broke into five biogeographic provinces, including the present-day East Pacific, West Atlantic, East Atlantic, Mediterranean Sea, and Indo-West Pacific. Palaeogeographic maps illustrate the Mesozoic Atlantic opening, the Cenozoic closure of the Tethys, the Messinian Salinity Crisis, the mid-Miocene closure of the Central American Seaway, and Quaternary geological changes...
October 12, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29024277/how-intraspecific-variation-in-seed-dispersing-animals-matters-for-plants
#2
Rafał Zwolak
Seed dispersal by animals is a complex phenomenon, characterized by multiple mechanisms and variable outcomes. Most researchers approach this complexity by analysing context-dependency in seed dispersal and investigating extrinsic factors that might influence interactions between plants and seed dispersers. Intrinsic traits of seed dispersers provide an alternative way of making sense of the enormous variation in seed fates. I review causes of intraspecific variability in frugivorous and granivorous animals, discuss their effects on seed dispersal, and outline likely consequences for plant populations and communities...
October 10, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28990321/ecological-and-evolutionary-legacy-of-megafauna-extinctions
#3
Mauro Galetti, Marcos Moleón, Pedro Jordano, Mathias M Pires, Paulo R Guimarães, Thomas Pape, Elizabeth Nichols, Dennis Hansen, Jens M Olesen, Michael Munk, Jacqueline S de Mattos, Andreas H Schweiger, Norman Owen-Smith, Christopher N Johnson, Robert J Marquis, Jens-Christian Svenning
For hundreds of millions of years, large vertebrates (megafauna) have inhabited most of the ecosystems on our planet. During the late Quaternary, notably during the Late Pleistocene and the early Holocene, Earth experienced a rapid extinction of large, terrestrial vertebrates. While much attention has been paid to understanding the causes of this massive megafauna extinction, less attention has been given to understanding the impacts of loss of megafauna on other organisms with whom they interacted. In this review, we discuss how the loss of megafauna disrupted and reshaped ecological interactions, and explore the ecological consequences of the ongoing decline of large vertebrates...
October 9, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28967704/reappraising-the-early-evidence-of-durophagy-and-drilling-predation-in-the-fossil-record-implications-for-escalation-and-the-cambrian-explosion
#4
Russell D C Bicknell, John R Paterson
The Cambrian Explosion is arguably the most extreme example of a biological radiation preserved in the fossil record, and studies of Cambrian Lagerstätten have facilitated the exploration of many facets of this key evolutionary event. As predation was a major ecological driver behind the Explosion - particularly the radiation of biomineralising metazoans - the evidence for shell crushing (durophagy), drilling and puncturing predation in the Cambrian (and possibly the Ediacaran) is considered. Examples of durophagous predation on biomineralised taxa other than trilobites are apparently rare, reflecting predator preference, taphonomic and sampling biases, or simply lack of documentation...
October 2, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28944555/biological-hierarchies-and-the-nature-of-extinction
#5
Curtis R Congreve, Amanda R Falk, James C Lamsdell
Hierarchy theory recognises that ecological and evolutionary units occur in a nested and interconnected hierarchical system, with cascading effects occurring between hierarchical levels. Different biological disciplines have routinely come into conflict over the primacy of different forcing mechanisms behind evolutionary and ecological change. These disconnects arise partly from differences in perspective (with some researchers favouring ecological forcing mechanisms while others favour developmental/historical mechanisms), as well as differences in the temporal framework in which workers operate...
September 24, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941124/comparing-species-interaction-networks-along-environmental-gradients
#6
Loïc Pellissier, Camille Albouy, Jordi Bascompte, Nina Farwig, Catherine Graham, Michel Loreau, Maria Alejandra Maglianesi, Carlos J Melián, Camille Pitteloud, Tomas Roslin, Rudolf Rohr, Serguei Saavedra, Wilfried Thuiller, Guy Woodward, Niklaus E Zimmermann, Dominique Gravel
Knowledge of species composition and their interactions, in the form of interaction networks, is required to understand processes shaping their distribution over time and space. As such, comparing ecological networks along environmental gradients represents a promising new research avenue to understand the organization of life. Variation in the position and intensity of links within networks along environmental gradients may be driven by turnover in species composition, by variation in species abundances and by abiotic influences on species interactions...
September 22, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941010/atad3-proteins-brokers-of-a-mitochondria-endoplasmic-reticulum-connection-in-mammalian-cells
#7
Jacques Baudier
In yeast, a sequence of physical and genetic interactions termed the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria organizing network (ERMIONE) controls mitochondria-ER interactions and mitochondrial biogenesis. Several functions that characterize ERMIONE complexes are conserved in mammalian cells, suggesting that a similar tethering complex must exist in metazoans. Recent studies have identified a new family of nuclear-encoded ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA+-ATPase) mitochondrial membrane proteins specific to multicellular eukaryotes, called the ATPase family AAA domain-containing protein 3 (ATAD3) proteins (ATAD3A and ATAD3B)...
September 20, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28929570/impacts-of-human-induced-environmental-change-in-wetlands-on-aquatic-animals
#8
Michael Sievers, Robin Hale, Kirsten M Parris, Stephen E Swearer
Many wetlands harbour highly diverse biological communities and provide extensive ecosystem services; however, these important ecological features are being altered, degraded and destroyed around the world. Despite a wealth of research on how animals respond to anthropogenic changes to natural wetlands and how they use created wetlands, we lack a broad synthesis of these data. While some altered wetlands may provide vital habitat, others could pose a considerable risk to wildlife. This risk will be heightened if such wetlands are ecological traps - preferred habitats that confer lower fitness than another available habitat...
September 19, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28921784/the-evolution-of-gonad-expenditure-and-gonadosomatic-index-gsi-in-male-and-female-broadcast-spawning-invertebrates
#9
Geoff A Parker, Steven A Ramm, Jussi Lehtonen, Jonathan M Henshaw
Sedentary broadcast-spawning marine invertebrates, which release both eggs and sperm into the water for fertilization, are of special interest for sexual selection studies. They provide unique insight into the early stages of the evolutionary succession leading to the often-intense operation of both pre- and post-mating sexual selection in mobile gonochorists. Since they are sessile or only weakly mobile, adults can interact only to a limited extent with other adults and with their own fertilized offspring...
September 18, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28913952/new-age-ideas-about-age-old-sex-separating-meiosis-from-mating-could-solve-a-century-old-conundrum
#10
Michael Brandeis
Ever since Darwin first addressed it, sexual reproduction reigns as the 'queen' of evolutionary questions. Multiple theories tried to explain how this apparently costly and cumbersome method has become the universal mode of eukaryote reproduction. Most theories stress the adaptive advantages of sex by generating variation, they fail however to explain the ubiquitous persistence of sexual reproduction also where adaptation is not an issue. I argue that the obstacle for comprehending the role of sex stems from the conceptual entanglement of two distinct processes - gamete production by meiosis and gamete fusion by mating (mixis)...
September 14, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28901723/the-arms-race-between-heliconiine-butterflies-and-passiflora-plants-new-insights-on-an-ancient-subject
#11
Érika C P de Castro, Mika Zagrobelny, Márcio Z Cardoso, Søren Bak
Heliconiines are called passion vine butterflies because they feed exclusively on Passiflora plants during the larval stage. Many features of Passiflora and heliconiines indicate that they have radiated and speciated in association with each other, and therefore this model system was one of the first examples used to exemplify coevolution theory. Three major adaptations of Passiflora plants supported arguments in favour of their coevolution with heliconiines: unusual variation of leaf shape within the genus; the occurrence of yellow structures mimicking heliconiine eggs; and their extensive diversity of defence compounds called cyanogenic glucosides...
September 13, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28881466/a-hot-lunch-for-herbivores-physiological-effects-of-elevated-temperatures-on-mammalian-feeding-ecology
#12
Phillipa K Beale, Karen J Marsh, William J Foley, Ben D Moore
Mammals maintain specific body temperatures (Tb ) across a broad range of ambient temperatures. The energy required for thermoregulation ultimately comes from the diet, and so what animals eat is inextricably linked to thermoregulation. Endothermic herbivores must balance energy requirements and expenditure with complicated thermoregulatory challenges from changing thermal, nutritional and toxicological environments. In this review we provide evidence that plant-based diets can influence thermoregulation beyond the control of herbivores, and that this can render them susceptible to heat stress...
September 7, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28836372/aphid-specialism-as-an-example-of-ecological-evolutionary-divergence
#13
Hugh D Loxdale, Adalbert Balog
Debate still continues around the definition of generalism and specialism in nature. To some, generalism is equated solely with polyphagy, but this cannot be readily divorced from other essential biological factors, such as morphology, behaviour, genetics, biochemistry, chemistry and ecology, including chemical ecology. Viewed in this light, and accepting that when living organisms evolve to fill new ecological-evolutionary niches, this is the primal act of specialisation, then perhaps all living organisms are specialist in the broadest sense...
August 23, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28815925/the-effects-of-hydropeaking-on-riverine-plants-a-review
#14
María D Bejarano, Roland Jansson, Christer Nilsson
Hydropeaking refers to frequent, rapid and short-term fluctuations in water flow and water levels downstream and upstream of hydropower stations. Such fluctuations are becoming increasingly common worldwide and are known to have far-reaching effects on riverine vegetation. Novel hydrology caused by hydropeaking has no natural correspondence in freshwater systems, and hence few species have adaptations to all its aspects. Here, we review the literature on hydropeaking effects on riverine plants and define the state of the information on this human alteration of riverine ecosystems...
August 17, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28799256/understanding-processes-at-the-origin-of-species-flocks-with-a-focus-on-the-marine-antarctic-fauna
#15
Anne Chenuil, Thomas Saucède, Lenaïg G Hemery, Marc Eléaume, Jean-Pierre Féral, Nadia Améziane, Bruno David, Guillaume Lecointre, Charlotte Havermans
Species flocks (SFs) fascinate evolutionary biologists who wonder whether such striking diversification can be driven by normal evolutionary processes. Multiple definitions of SFs have hindered the study of their origins. Previous studies identified a monophyletic taxon as a SF if it displays high speciosity in an area in which it is endemic (criterion 1), high ecological diversity among species (criterion 2), and if it dominates the habitat in terms of biomass (criterion 3); we used these criteria in our analyses...
August 10, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28795526/coupling-factors-and-exosomal-packaging-micrornas-involved-in-the-regulation-of-bone-remodelling
#16
Sipin Zhu, Felix Yao, Heng Qiu, Ge Zhang, Huazi Xu, Jiake Xu
Bone remodelling is a continuous process by which bone resorption by osteoclasts is followed by bone formation by osteoblasts to maintain skeletal homeostasis. These two forces must be tightly coordinated not only quantitatively, but also in time and space, and its malfunction leads to diseases such as osteoporosis. Recent research focusing on the cross-talk and coupling mechanisms associated with the sequential recruitment of osteoblasts to areas where osteoclasts have removed bone matrix have identified a number of osteogenic factors produced by the osteoclasts themselves...
August 10, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28795474/endocrine-disruption-in-aquatic-systems-up-scaling-research-to-address-ecological-consequences
#17
Fredric M Windsor, Steve J Ormerod, Charles R Tyler
Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can alter biological function in organisms at environmentally relevant concentrations and are a significant threat to aquatic biodiversity, but there is little understanding of exposure consequences for populations, communities and ecosystems. The pervasive nature of EDCs within aquatic environments and their multiple sub-lethal effects make assessments of their impact especially important but also highly challenging. Herein, we review the data on EDC effects in aquatic systems focusing on studies assessing populations and ecosystems, and including how biotic and abiotic processes may affect, and be affected by, responses to EDCs...
August 9, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28776950/genetics-of-dispersal
#18
Marjo Saastamoinen, Greta Bocedi, Julien Cote, Delphine Legrand, Frédéric Guillaume, Christopher W Wheat, Emanuel A Fronhofer, Cristina Garcia, Roslyn Henry, Arild Husby, Michel Baguette, Dries Bonte, Aurélie Coulon, Hanna Kokko, Erik Matthysen, Kristjan Niitepõld, Etsuko Nonaka, Virginie M Stevens, Justin M J Travis, Kathleen Donohue, James M Bullock, Maria Del Mar Delgado
Dispersal is a process of central importance for the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of populations and communities, because of its diverse consequences for gene flow and demography. It is subject to evolutionary change, which begs the question, what is the genetic basis of this potentially complex trait? To address this question, we (i) review the empirical literature on the genetic basis of dispersal, (ii) explore how theoretical investigations of the evolution of dispersal have represented the genetics of dispersal, and (iii) discuss how the genetic basis of dispersal influences theoretical predictions of the evolution of dispersal and potential consequences...
August 3, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28766908/building-essential-biodiversity-variables-ebvs-of-species-distribution-and-abundance-at-a-global-scale
#19
W Daniel Kissling, Jorge A Ahumada, Anne Bowser, Miguel Fernandez, Néstor Fernández, Enrique Alonso García, Robert P Guralnick, Nick J B Isaac, Steve Kelling, Wouter Los, Louise McRae, Jean-Baptiste Mihoub, Matthias Obst, Monica Santamaria, Andrew K Skidmore, Kristen J Williams, Donat Agosti, Daniel Amariles, Christos Arvanitidis, Lucy Bastin, Francesca De Leo, Willi Egloff, Jane Elith, Donald Hobern, David Martin, Henrique M Pereira, Graziano Pesole, Johannes Peterseil, Hannu Saarenmaa, Dmitry Schigel, Dirk S Schmeller, Nicola Segata, Eren Turak, Paul F Uhlir, Brian Wee, Alex R Hardisty
Much biodiversity data is collected worldwide, but it remains challenging to assemble the scattered knowledge for assessing biodiversity status and trends. The concept of Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) was introduced to structure biodiversity monitoring globally, and to harmonize and standardize biodiversity data from disparate sources to capture a minimum set of critical variables required to study, report and manage biodiversity change. Here, we assess the challenges of a 'Big Data' approach to building global EBV data products across taxa and spatiotemporal scales, focusing on species distribution and abundance...
August 2, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28752629/comparative-analyses-of-basal-rate-of-metabolism-in-mammals-data-selection-does-matter
#20
Michel Genoud, Karin Isler, Robert D Martin
Basal rate of metabolism (BMR) is a physiological parameter that should be measured under strictly defined experimental conditions. In comparative analyses among mammals BMR is widely used as an index of the intensity of the metabolic machinery or as a proxy for energy expenditure. Many databases with BMR values for mammals are available, but the criteria used to select metabolic data as BMR estimates have often varied and the potential effect of this variability has rarely been questioned. We provide a new, expanded BMR database reflecting compliance with standard criteria (resting, postabsorptive state; thermal neutrality; adult, non-reproductive status for females) and examine potential effects of differential selectivity on the results of comparative analyses...
July 27, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
journal
journal
24752
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"