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Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29329407/transplant-buccaneers-p-k-sen-and-india-s-first-heart-transplant-february-1968
#1
David S Jones, Kavita Sivaramakrishnan
On 17 February 1968, Bombay surgeon Prafulla Kumar Sen transplanted a human heart, becoming the fourth surgeon in the world to attempt the feat. Even though the patient survived just three hours, the feat won Sen worldwide acclaim. The ability of Sen's team to join the ranks of the world's surgical pioneers raises interesting questions. How was Sen able to transplant so quickly? He had to train a team of collaborators, import or reverse engineer technologies and techniques that had been developed largely in the United States, and begin conversations with Indian political authorities about the contested concept of brain death...
January 10, 2018: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29253198/the-island-of-alternatives-power-medical-science-and-gentle-birthing-in-socialist-czechoslovakia
#2
Ema Hrešanová
Beginning in the early 1980s, medical experts and birthing women increasingly voiced criticism of what had long been the technocratic, depersonalized nature of obstetric treatment in Czechoslovakia, despite the limited opportunities for them to do so publicly. A few maternity hospitals responded to the complaints by introducing radically different regimens of care. This article examines the history of one reformist project that took place in the small town of Ostrov nad Ohří. Ostrov means "island" in Czech and, during the last decade of Communist rule in Czechoslovakia, the Ostrov hospital became an island of alternative obstetric care, embracing Leboyer's method of "gentle birthing," acupuncture, fathers in delivery rooms, and assorted technological innovations that aimed to spark fundamental change in familial and social relationships, and humanize childbirth...
December 14, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29240893/risk-and-reputation-obstetricians-cesareans-and-consent
#3
Jacqueline H Wolf
When physicians performed cesarean sections in the nineteenth century, they customarily sought agreement from all present before proceeding. In contrast, after the introduction of electronic fetal monitoring in the late 1960s, obstetricians obtained permission for a cesarean by offering a choice that ensured consent-give birth by cesarean or give birth vaginally to a damaged or dead baby. This article argues that the manner in which physicians obtained consent for cesareans in the nineteenth century was one factor that kept the cesarean rate low, while the manner in which physicians obtained consent in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries was one factor driving up the cesarean rate...
December 12, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29237011/back-to-bed-from-hospital-to-home-obstetrics-in-the-city-of-chicago
#4
Wendy Kline
This article analyzes the role of doctors and activists in Chicago who successfully redefined the practice and politics of childbirth both locally and ultimately nationwide. It begins with the story of Joseph DeLee's Chicago Maternity Center, responsible for supervising over 100,000 home births between 1932 and 1972. Most of the mothers cared for by the Center were nonwhite, poor, and had little or no access to prenatal care, yet their babies had a far higher survival rate than the nationwide average. Thousands of medical students from all over the Midwest experienced their first deliveries not in hospitals, but in these homes...
December 11, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29228371/childbirth-history-as-everyone-s-history
#5
Eugene Declercq
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 8, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29253165/childbirth-and-trauma-1940s-1980s
#6
Paula A Michaels
This article analyzes trauma in mid-twentieth century hospital births, focusing on the United States, but with additional evidence drawn from Great Britain and France. As many as half of women today experience childbirth as traumatic and no evidence suggests that the figure was lower a half-century ago. Drawing on women's birth narratives and psychiatric literature, this article highlights the striking consistency over time in how women describe their experiences of traumatic birth. By the 1970s, however, women proved less ready to accept their trauma as the product of their own psychological shortcomings...
January 1, 2018: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28973592/testing-the-gr%C3%A3-fenberg-ring-in-interwar-britain-norman-haire-helena-wright-and-the-debate-over-statistical-evidence-side-effects-and-intra-uterine-contraception
#7
Caroline Rusterholz
This paper examines the introduction to Britain of the Gräfenberg ring, an early version of what later became known as an intrauterine device (IUD). The struggle during the interwar years to establish the value of the ring provides an opportunity for a case study of the evaluation and acceptance of a new medical device. With the professionalization of the birth control movement and the expansion of birth control clinics in interwar Britain, efforts to develop better scientific means for contraception grew rapidly...
October 1, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28973591/war-medicine-and-cultural-diplomacy-in-the-americas-frank-wilson-and-brazilian-cardiology
#8
Simone P Kropf, Joel D Howell
American cultural diplomacy played a key role in the institutionalization of Brazilian cardiology. In 1942, Frank Wilson, an internationally recognized pioneer in electrocardiography, made an extended wartime visit to Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo. The visit was sponsored by the United States Department of State as part of Roosevelt's Good Neighbor Policy and brought Wilson together with a group of physicians who would establish the specialty of cardiology in Brazil. This US cultural and diplomatic initiative strengthened an academic network that was already evolving and would eventually prove to be of benefit to both sides...
October 1, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28973590/medical-history-s-moment-in-art-photography-1920-to-1950-how-lejaren-%C3%A3-hiller-and-valentino-sarra-created-a-fashion-for-scenes-of-early-surgery
#9
Bert Hansen
Two groups of black-and-white photographs are found in medical rare book rooms and the collections of historically minded physicians. They were created by artists Hiller and Sarra to bring medical history to life for members of the health professions and, to some extent, for a wider public. These were not didactic illustrations for a textbook, but elegant scenes of great figures from Antiquity to the nineteenth century, evocation not documentation even though they were based on research. As pieces of fine art, cherished in portfolios or framed on the wall, the quality prints were intended to stimulate curiosity about the achievements of the figures portrayed...
October 1, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28973589/redefining-medical-confidentiality-in-the-digital-era-healthcare-reform-and-the-west-german-debate-over-the-use-of-personal-medical-information-in-the-1980s
#10
Larry Frohman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 1, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28977513/erratum
#11
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 13, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28873982/-forgotten-chapters-in-the-history-of-transcervical-sterilization-carl-clauberg-and-hans-joachim-lindemann
#12
Sabine Hildebrandt, Susan Benedict, Erin Miller, Michael Gaffney, Michael A Grodin
Transcervical sterilization is a non-surgical method of permanent female sterilization that is widely used and critically discussed. A review of the historiography of the method reveals that instances of its coercive use are not included in the historical account. This study offers a reexamination of the work of Carl Clauberg and Hans-Joachim Lindemann, to more deeply contextualize within the framework of current usage the coercive use of transcervical sterilization during the Third Reich and in postwar Germany...
July 1, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28873981/-his-native-hot-country-1-racial-science-and-environment-in-antebellum-american-medical-thought
#13
Christopher D Willoughby
Relying on a close reading of more than 4,000 medicals student theses, this essay explores the evolving medical approaches to race and environment in the early national and antebellum United States and highlights the role that medical school pedagogy played in disseminating and elaborating racial theory. Specifically, it considers the influence of racial science on medical concepts of the relationship of bodies to climates. At their core, monogenesis-belief in a single, unified human race-and polygenesis-the belief that each race was created separately-were theories about the human body's connections to the natural world...
July 1, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28575351/-enquire-into-all-the-circumstances-of-the-patient-narrowly-john-rutherford-s-clinical-lectures-in-edinburgh-1749-53
#14
Stephen C Craig
Early eighteenth-century Edinburgh provided a unique learning environment for aspiring practitioners: one in which the unity of medicine and surgery was appreciated and clinical observations and a reasoning practitioner became the well spring of proper patient care. John Rutherford, a surgical apprentice in this environment, student on the wards of London hospitals and under Boerhaave at Leiden, became one of the original medical professors at the University of Edinburgh medical school in 1726. Rutherford taught the popular, theory-based Practice of Medicine for twenty-two years...
July 1, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28444289/-one-simply-doesn-t-arbitrate-authorship-of-thoughts-socialized-medicine-medical-mccarthyism-and-the-publishing-of-rural-health-and-medical-care-1948
#15
J T H Connor
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 1, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28402543/courtney-q-shah-sex-ed-segregated-the-quest-for-sexual-knowledge-in-progressive-era-america
#16
Alexandra Lord
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 10, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28402448/catherine-l-thompson-patient-expectations-how-economics-religion-and-malpractice-shaped-therapeutics-in-early-america
#17
Matthew Reeves
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 10, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28335017/the-medical-battery-in-the-united-states-1870-1920-electrotherapy-at-home-and-in-the-clinic
#18
Anna Wexler
This paper focuses on the history of a portable shock-producing electrotherapeutic device known as the medical battery (1870-1920), which provided both direct and alternating current and was thought to cure a wide variety of ailments. The product occupied a unique space at the nexus of medicine, consumerism and quackery: it was simultaneously considered a legitimate device by medical professionals who practiced electrotherapeutics, yet identical versions were sold directly to consumers, often via newspaper advertisements and with cure-all marketing language...
April 1, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334954/the-science-and-politics-of-naming-reforming-anatomical-nomenclature-ca-1886-1955
#19
Tatjana Buklijas
Anatomical nomenclature is medicine's official language. Early in their medical studies, students are expected to memorize not only the bodily geography but also the names for all the structures that, by consensus, constitute the anatomical body. The making and uses of visual maps of the body have received considerable historiographical attention, yet the history of production, communication, and reception of anatomical names-a history as long as the history of anatomy itself-has been studied far less. My essay examines the reforms of anatomical naming between the first modern nomenclature, the 1895 Basel Nomina Anatomica (BNA), and the 1955 Nomina Anatomica Parisiensia (NAP, also known as PNA), which is the basis for current anatomical terminology...
April 1, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334826/military-officers-tropical-medicine-and-racial-thought-in-the-formation-of-the-west-india-regiments-1793-1802
#20
Michael Joseph
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 1, 2017: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
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