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Hastings Center Report

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543662/inclusion-access-and-civility-in-public-bioethics
#1
Rebecca Dresser
I could tell many war stories about my experience serving on the President's Council on Bioethics-one of the most controversial national bioethics commissions so far-but I want to focus instead on how the experience influenced my views on bioethics, politics, and the potential contributions of national commissions. The executive order that established the Council directed it to consider policy questions, but it spoke primarily of providing a forum for national discussion, inquiry, and education. In this sense, the Council's mission departed from that of other national bioethics commissions, which have had more direct policy functions...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543661/building-the-next-bioethics-commission
#2
Alexander M Capron
At every moment, somewhere in the world, a group of men and women are sitting around a table deliberating about an ethical issue posed by medicine and research, whether as a research ethics committee; a hospital or clinical ethics committee; a stem-cell review committee; a gene transfer research committee; a biobank ethics committee; an ethics advisory committee for a medical or nursing association or nongovernmental organization; a state, provincial, national, or intergovernmental bioethics committee; or an ad hoc panel examining a particular development or case...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543660/challenges-working-with-presidential-bioethics-commissions
#3
Ruth Macklin
Presidential commissions come and go by design, and it is reasonable to wonder about the impact of their recommendations. I have been involved in the work of two presidential commissions: as a member of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (from 1994 to 1995) and as senior consultant to the National Bioethics Advisory Commission (from 1999 to 2000) for its report on multinational research. I continue to reflect on and look for the impact of both these commissions. ACHRE's charter included the review of experiments with ionizing radiation sponsored or conducted by the United States government since the 1940s...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543659/about-the-presidential-commission-for-the-study-of-bioethical-issues
#4
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543658/the-virtues-of-national-ethics-committees
#5
Jonathan Montgomery
The United Kingdom has many bodies that play their part in carrying out the work of national ethics committees, but its nearest equivalent of a U.S. presidential bioethics commission is the Nuffield Council on Bioethics, established in 1991. The Council is charged with examining ethical questions raised by developments in biological and medical research, publishing reports, and making representations to appropriate bodies in order to respond to or anticipate public concern. It is a nongovernment organization with no defined or guaranteed channels of influence...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543657/ethical-principles-process-and-the-work-of-bioethics-commissions
#6
Daniel P Sulmasy
Shortly after the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues was constituted in 2010 and days before the commission members were to join a conference call to discuss possible topics for their deliberation, Craig Venter held a press conference announcing that his lab had created a synthetic chromosome for a species of mycoplasma and had inserted this genetic material into organisms of another species of mycoplasma (the genes of which had been deactivated), transforming the host species into the donor species...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543656/international-capacity-building-initiatives-for-national-bioethics-committees
#7
Eugenijus Gefenas, Vilma Lukaseviciene
During the last two decades, national bioethics committees have been established in many countries all over the world. They vary with respect to their structure, composition, and working methods, but the main functions are similar. They are supposed to facilitate public debate on controversial bioethical issues and produce opinions and recommendations that can help inform the public and policy-makers. The dialogue among national bioethics committees is also increasingly important in the globalized world, where biomedical technologies raise ethical dilemmas that traverse national borders...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543655/public-practices-and-personal-perspectives
#8
EDITORIAL
Gregory E Kaebnick
I once heard John Arras, who was one of bioethics' bright lights and, toward the end of his life, a member of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, remark that it is hard for an ethics commission not to "do paint-by-numbers ethics." What I think Arras had in mind is an approach that, in the set of essays that make up this special report, Rebecca Dresser describes as a listing of "general, often relatively uncontroversial" moral positions to support largely procedural recommendations...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543654/national-bioethics-commissions-as-educators
#9
Lisa M Lee
As has become tradition, executive directors of United States' presidential bioethics committees offer reflections about their experience shortly after the orderly shutdown of the commission staff. After the records are filed according to government records regulations; after all the staff members, who are hired into temporary positions that must be renewed every two years, have secured permanent employment; after preparations are made to ensure that the next commission staff (should there be one) has a budget and standard operating procedures in order to begin its work in a timely manner; after the lights are turned out for the last time, the executive director makes the final climb up the stairs into the sunlight and reflects on the whirlwind...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543653/ripples-what-to-expect-when-you-serve-on-a-bioethics-commission
#10
Thomas H Murray
Cloning was the issue that put the National Bioethics Advisory Commission on the map, but the first clue that NBAC would address cloning was a terse fax from the White House to each of us who served on the Commission. The fax noted that with the birth of the sheep named Dolly, mammalian cloning was now a reality, and it tasked NBAC with providing advice on the ethics of human cloning and how the nation should respond to it. We were given ninety days to report our findings. That's a very tight deadline for a report written by a committee, but we met it, and along the way, I learned important lessons...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543652/what-s-the-use-disparate-purposes-of-u-s-federal-bioethics-commissions
#11
Jenny Dyck Brian, Robert Cook-Deegan
In the forty-year history of U.S. bioethics commissions, these government-sanctioned forums have often demonstrated their power to address pressing problems and to enable policy change. For example, the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research, established in 1974, left a legacy of reports that were translated into regulations and had an enormous practical impact. And the 1982 report Splicing Life, by the President's Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Biomedical and Behavioral Research, became the basis for the National Institutes of Health's Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee as well as for the Food and Drug Administration's developing "Points to Consider" when contemplating the introduction of recombinant DNA into human beings...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543651/the-past-present-and-future-of-mexico-s-national-bioethics-commission
#12
Manuel Ruiz de Chavez, Aidee Orozco, Gustavo Olaiz
The establishment of Mexico's National Bioethics Commission (Comisión Nacional de Bioética), in 1992, was conceived within the context of a global movement aimed at raising awareness of the ethical implications of technological and scientific development, especially in biomedicine. In 2005, a new decree put the commission under the scope of the Secretariat of Health and granted it technical and operational autonomy, allowing it to become a regulatory agency aimed at promoting a culture of bioethics, encouraging reflection on human health, and developing guidelines for health care, research, and education, through a global, secular, and democratic perspective...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543649/a-broader-bioethics-topic-selection-and-the-impact-of-national-bioethics-commissions
#13
Jason L Schwartz
Comparative assessments of national bioethics commissions in the United States commonly look at the differences among these groups over their forty-year history. A particular focus has been differences in the membership, mission, methods, and reports of the President's Council on Bioethics, which was active from 2001 until 2009, compared to those of its predecessors and the recent Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, active from 2009 until 2016. The differences are real, but disproportionate attention to them can obscure the substantial similarities in commissions' structure and function throughout the history of expert bioethics advice to government...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543648/making-the-choices-necessary-to-make-a-difference-the-responsibility-of-national-bioethics-commissions
#14
Christine Grady
In this essay, I offer some reflections on how the topics were identified and approached by the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, on which I had the honor to serve, in the hope that the reflections may be useful to future national bioethics commissions. In the executive order that established the bioethics commission, President Obama explicitly recognized the ethical imperative to responsibly pursue science, innovation, and advances in biomedical research and health care, and the importance of national attention to these issues...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543647/reflections-on-democratic-deliberation-in-bioethics
#15
Amy Gutmann, James W Wagner
Over the course of six years and more than two dozen meetings, members of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues learned so many things: about emerging science; technological challenges; citizen engagement; the public's, experts', and our own understandings and misperceptions; and even the nature of our own most cherished values. Our commission's commitment to democratic deliberation began deliberatively, when we decided (in the summer of 2010) upon basic principles to guide our first report...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543646/sponsoring-organization
#16
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543645/reflections-on-the-national-bioethics-advisory-commission-and-models-of-public-bioethics
#17
James F Childress
The National Bioethics Advisory Commission, of which I was a member, was established by a 1995 executive order that identified its "first priority" as "the protection of the rights and welfare of human research subjects." Not surprisingly, then, most of NBAC's work focused on research involving human subjects or participants. A second priority concerned "issues in the management and use of genetics information, including but not limited to, human gene patenting." NBAC's charter (in contrast to the executive order) listed this charge as "part B" of the "first priority...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543424/how-to-rethink-the-fourteen-day-rule
#18
Sarah Chan
Recently, attention has been drawn to the basic principles governing the use of human embryos in research: specifically, the so-called fourteen-day rule. This rule stipulates that human embryos should not be allowed to grow in vitro past fourteen days of development. For years, the fourteen-day limit was largely theoretical, since culture techniques were not sufficient to maintain embryos up to this point. Yet in the past year, research has suggested that growing embryos beyond fourteen days might be feasible and scientifically valuable...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543423/research-with-pregnant-women-new-insights-on-legal-decision-making
#19
Anna C Mastroianni, Leslie Meltzer Henry, David Robinson, Theodore Bailey, Ruth R Faden, Margaret O Little, Anne Drapkin Lyerly
U.S. researchers and scholars often point to two legal factors as significant obstacles to the inclusion of pregnant women in clinical research: the Department of Health and Human Services' regulatory limitations specific to pregnant women's research participation and the fear of liability for potential harm to children born following a pregnant woman's research participation. This article offers a more nuanced view of the potential legal complexities that can impede research with pregnant women than has previously been reflected in the literature...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543422/defending-opioid-treatment-agreements-disclosure-not-promises
#20
Joshua B Rager, Peter H Schwartz
In order to receive controlled pain medications for chronic non-oncologic pain, patients often must sign a "narcotic contract" or "opioid treatment agreement" in which they promise not to give pills to others, use illegal drugs, or seek controlled medications from health care providers. In addition, they must agree to use the medication as prescribed and to come to the clinic for drug testing and pill counts. Patients acknowledge that if they violate the opioid treatment agreement (OTA), they may no longer receive controlled medications...
May 2017: Hastings Center Report
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