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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27552800/a-little-praise-goes-a-long-way
#1
David Haslam
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27552799/blood-letting-in-1916
#2
Leonard Williams
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27552798/sun-damage
#3
Nigel Stollery
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27552797/erectile-dysfunction-heralds-onset-of-cardiovascular-disease
#4
Joyee Basu, Sanjay Sharma
Erectile dysfunction (ED) was once assumed to be a psychological condition but has now been shown to share risk factors with cardiovascular disease including age, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia, suggesting an underlying vascular pathology. Evidence reveals that there is a potential link between ED and subsequent development of coronary artery disease. ED itself may also increase cardiovascular risk. The relative risk of developing coronary artery disease within ten years, in patients with moderate to severe ED, has been calculated as 14% in men aged 30-39 years and may be as high as 27% in those aged 60-69...
June 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27552796/early-intervention-crucial-in-anxiety-disorders-in-children
#5
Helen Griffiths, Mina Fazel
Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health disorders of childhood. Three quarters of anxiety disorders have their origins in childhood, with presentation often chronic in nature. Children with an anxiety disorder are 3.5 times more likely to experience depression or anxiety in adulthood, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Making a diagnosis can often prove difficult. It is important for clinicians to distinguish between normal anxiety and anxiety disorders...
June 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27552795/optimising-the-management-of-wheeze-in-preschool-children
#6
Steven McVea, Thomas Bourke
One third of all preschool children will have an episode of wheeze and many of these present to primary care. Most will fall within a spectrum of diagnosis ranging from episodic viral wheeze to multiple trigger wheeze or early onset asthma. A small proportion will have other rare, but important, diagnoses such as foreign body aspiration, anaphylaxis, gastro-oesophageal reflux, congenital anatomical abnormalities or other chronic lung diseases. Clinical assessment should try to classify children into either episodic viral wheeze or multiple trigger wheeze phenotypes...
June 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27552794/does-early-introduction-of-foods-protect-against-allergy
#7
EDITORIAL
Chris Barclay
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27382918/a-lesson-from-a-patient
#8
David Haslam
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27382917/careful-assessment-the-key-to-diagnosing-adolescent-heel-pain
#9
Martin J Davison, S Kenneth David-West, Roderick Duncan
The most common cause of adolescent heel pain is calcaneal apophysitis also known as Sever's disease. The condition may occur in adolescent athletes, particularly those involved in running or jumping activities, during the pubertal growth spurt. The mean age of presentation in Sever's disease is ten, (range 7-15). It presents with posterior heel pain that is worse with activity and relieved by rest in most cases. Sever's disease, Osgood Schlatter's disease (tibial tuberosity) and Sinding-Larsen Johansson syndrome (distal patella) are all overuse syndromes brought about by repetitive submaximal loading and microtrauma...
May 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27382916/managing-patients-with-hidradenitis-suppurativa
#10
Stephanie L Ball, Michael J Tidman
Hidradenitis suppurativa affects the apocrine-bearing areas of the skin. The onset is variable but usually occurs in the second and third decades of life, coinciding with development of the apocrine glands. The condition is characterised by painful, inflammatory papules and nodules which frequently progress to form abscesses, sinus tracts and hypertrophic scars. Bacteria are not felt to have a primary role in lesion formation, and abscesses are often sterile. The diagnosis of hidradenitis suppurativa is clinically based, without a specific diagnostic test...
May 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27382915/be-vigilant-for-post-traumatic-stress-reactions
#11
Alastair M Hull, Stephen A Curran
Most people experience at least one potentially traumatic event (PTE) during their life. Many will develop only transient distress and not a psychological illness. Even the most inherently horrific event does not invariably lead to the development of a psychological disorder while an individual with sufficient vulnerabilit may develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after what appears be an event of low magnitude. The diagnosis of PTSD differs fro most psychiatric disorders as it includes an aetiological factor, the traumatic event, as a core criterion...
May 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27382914/diagnosing-young-onset-dementia-can-be-challenging
#12
Samrah Ahmed, Ian Baker, Christopher R Butler
Although the risk of developing dementia increases with age, onset can be as early as the third or fourth decade of life. Genetic influences play a more important role in younger than in older people with dementia, so young onset dementia may cluster in families. Diagnosing young onset dementia is challenging. The range of possible presenting features is broad, encompassing behavioural, cognitive, psychiatric and neurological domains, and symptoms are often subtle initially. Frequently the complaints are misattributed to stress or depression, and the patient is falsely reassured that they are too young to have dementia...
May 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27382913/neurasthenia-in-war
#13
Frederick C Forster
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27382912/antidepressants-and-cardiovascular-risk
#14
EDITORIAL
Phillip Bland
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27337759/keeping-yourself-on-track
#15
David Haslam
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27337758/conditions-affecting-the-hair-and-scalp
#16
Nigil Stollery
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27337757/difficult-dislocations
#17
W Paulson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27337756/rapid-diagnosis-vital-in-thunderclap-headache
#18
REVIEW
Andrew Barritt, Sarah Miller, Indran Davagnanam, Manjit Matharu
Thunderclap headache is a severe and acute headache that reaches maximum intensity in under one minute and lasts for more than five minutes. Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) accounts for 10-25% of all thunderclap headaches and, despite advances in medical technology, has a 90-day mortality of 30%. Up to a quarter of cases of SAH are misdiagnosed, often through failure to follow guidance. Thunderclap headaches may be associated with symptoms such as photophobia, nausea, vomiting, neck pain, focal neurological symptoms or loss of consciousness...
April 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27337755/the-role-of-psa-in-detection-and-management-of-prostate-cancer
#19
REVIEW
Roger Kirby
The prostate specific antigen (PSA) test clearly provides the opportunity for clinically relevant prostate cancer to be detected at a stage when treatment options are greater and outcomes may be improved. However, in some patients the PSA test may lead to investigations which can identify clinically insignificant cancers which would not have become evident in a man's lifetime. In addition, a raised PSA may often indicate benign prostatic enlargement, and this may provide an opportunity for treatment of this condition before complications develop...
April 2016: Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27337754/managing-lower-urinary-tract-symptoms-in-men
#20
REVIEW
Kenneth R MacKenzie, Jonathan J Aning
Male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common and increase in prevalence with age. Up to 90% of men aged 50 to 80 may suffer from troublesome LUTS. Men may attend expressing direct concern about micturition, describing one or more LUTS and the related impact on their quality of life. Frequently men may present for other medical or urological reasons such as concern regarding their risk of having prostate cancer or erectile dysfunction but on taking a history bothersome LUTS are identified. Men may present late in the community with urinary retention: the inability to pass urine...
April 2016: Practitioner
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