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Journal of Animal Ecology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543867/an-age-dependent-fitness-cost-of-migration-old-trans-saharan-migrating-spoonbills-breed-later-than-those-staying-in-europe-and-late-breeders-have-lower-recruitment
#1
Tamar Lok, Linde Veldhoen, Otto Overdijk, Joost M Tinbergen, Theunis Piersma
Migration is a widespread phenomenon in the animal kingdom. On the basis of the considerable variation that exists between and within species, and even within populations, we may be able to infer the (age- and sex-specific) ecological trade-offs and constraints moulding migration systems from assessments of fitness associated with migration and wintering in different areas. During three consecutive breeding seasons, we compared the reproductive performance (timing of breeding, breeding success, chick body condition and post-fledging survival) of Eurasian spoonbills Platalea leucorodia that breed at a single breeding site in The Netherlands, but migrate different distances (ca...
May 25, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542979/consequences-of-symbiont-co-infections-for-insect-host-phenotypes
#2
Ailsa H C McLean, Benjamin J Parker, Jan Hrček, James Kavanagh, Peter A D Wellham, H Charles J Godfray
1.Most animals host communities of symbiotic bacteria. In insects, these symbionts may have particularly intimate interactions with their hosts: many are intracellular and can play important roles in host ecology and evolution, including protection against natural enemies. 2.We investigated how interactions between different species or strains of endosymbiotic bacteria within an aphid host influence the outcome of symbiosis for both symbiont and host. 3.We first asked whether different combinations of facultative symbiont species or strains can exist in stable co-infections...
May 25, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543058/shallow-size-density-relations-within-mammal-clades-suggest-greater-intra-guild-ecological-impact-of-large-bodied-species
#3
R Ø Pedersen, S Faurby, J-C Svenning
1.Population densities of species have a predictable relationship to their body mass on a global scale. This relationship is known as the size-density relationship. The relationship was originally found to be directly opposite of metabolic rate scaling, which led to the hypothesis of energetic equivalence. However, recent studies have suggested that the size-density relationship varies between clades. Specifically, the size-density relationship for certain mammal clades has been found to be less negative than the relationship across all mammals...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543048/estimating-demographic-contributions-to-effective-population-size-in-an-age-structured-wild-population-experiencing-environmental-and-demographic-stochasticity
#4
Amanda E Trask, Eric M Bignal, Davy I McCracken, Stuart B Piertney, Jane M Reid
1.A population's effective size (Ne ) is a key parameter that shapes rates of inbreeding and loss of genetic diversity, thereby influencing evolutionary processes and population viability. However estimating Ne , and identifying key demographic mechanisms that underlie the Ne to census population size (N) ratio, remains challenging, especially for small populations with overlapping generations and substantial environmental and demographic stochasticity and hence dynamic age-structure. 2.A sophisticated demographic method of estimating Ne /N, which uses Fisher's reproductive value to account for dynamic age-structure, has been formulated...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542896/diverse-responses-of-species-to-landscape-fragmentation-in-a-simple-food-chain
#5
Jinbao Liao, Daniel Bearup, Bernd Blasius
1.Habitat destruction, characterized by habitat loss and fragmentation, is a key driver of species extinction in spatial extended communities. Recently, there has been some progress in the theory of spatial food webs, however to date practically little is known about how habitat configurational fragmentation influences multi-trophic food web dynamics. 2.To explore how habitat fragmentation affects species persistence in food webs, we introduce a modelling framework that describes the site occupancy of species in a tri-trophic system...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543388/environmental-constraints-on-the-compositional-and-phylogenetic-beta-diversity-of-tropical-forest-snake-assemblages
#6
Mario R Moura, Henrique C Costa, Antônio J S Argôlo, Walter Jetz
The ongoing biodiversity crisis increases the importance and urgency of studies addressing the role of environmental variation on the composition and evolutionary history of species assemblages, but especially the tropics and ectotherms remain understudied. In regions with rainy summers, coexistence of ectothermic species may be determined by the partitioning of the climatic niche, since ectotherms can rely on water availability and thermoregulatory behaviour to buffer constraints along their climatic niche...
May 22, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543273/differential-dispersal-and-the-allee-effect-create-power-law-behavior-distribution-of-spot-infestations-during-mountain-pine-beetle-outbreaks
#7
James A Powell, Martha J Garlick, Barbara J Bentz, Nicholas Friedenberg
Mountain pine beetles (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) are aggressive insects attacking Pinus host trees. Pines use defensive resin to overwhelm attackers, creating an Allee effect requiring beetles to attack en masse to successfully reproduce. MPB kill hosts, leaving observable, dying trees with red needles. Landscape patterns of infestation depend on MPB dispersal, which decreases with host density. Away from contiguously impacted patches (low beetle densities), infestations are characterized by apparently random spots (of 1-10 trees)...
May 22, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542919/context-dependent-colonization-dynamics-regional-reward-contagion-drives-local-compression-in-aquatic-beetles
#8
Matthew R Pintar, William J Resetarits
1.Habitat selection by colonizing organisms is an important factor in determining species abundance and community dynamics at multiple spatial scales. Many organisms select habitat patches based on intrinsic patch quality, but patches exist in complex landscapes linked by dispersal and colonization, forming metapopulations and metacommunities. Perceived patch quality can be influenced by neighboring patches through spatial contagion, wherein perceived quality of one patch can extend beyond its borders and either increase or decrease the colonization of neighboring patches and localities...
May 19, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542901/mechanisms-and-implications-of-a-type-iv-functional-response-for-short-term-intake-rate-of-dry-matter-in-large-mammalian-herbivores
#9
J C Mezzalira, O J F Bonnet, P C de F Carvalho, L Fonseca, C Bremm, C C Mezzalira, E A Laca
1.The functional response (i.e. the relationship between consumers' intake rate and resource density) is central in plant-herbivore interactions. Its shape and the biological processes leading to it have significant implications for both foraging theory and ecology of grazing systems. 2.A type IV functional response (i.e. dome-shaped relationship) of short-term intake rate of dry matter (intake while grazing) has rarely been reported for large herbivores and the conditions that can lead to it are poorly understood...
May 19, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28518216/queen-presence-mediates-the-relationship-between-collective-behavior-and-disease-susceptibility-in-ant-colonies
#10
Carl N Keiser, Svjetlana Vojvodic, Imani O Butler, Elizabeth Sartain, Volker H W Rudolf, Julia B Saltz
The success of social living can be explained, in part, by a group's ability to execute collective behaviors unachievable by solitary individuals. However, groups vary in their ability to execute these complex behaviors, often because they vary in their phenotypic composition. Group membership changes over time due to mortality or emigration, potentially leaving groups vulnerable to ecological challenges in times of flux. In some societies, the loss of important individuals (e.g., leaders, elites, queens) may have an especially detrimental effect on groups' ability to deal with these challenges...
May 18, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28504834/resource-stoichiometry-and-availability-modulate-species-richness-and-biomass-of-tropical-litter-macro-invertebrates
#11
Malte Jochum, Andrew D Barnes, Patrick Weigelt, David Ott, Katja Rembold, Achmad Farajallah, Ulrich Brose
1. The high biodiversity and biomass of soil communities is crucial for litter decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems such as tropical forests. However, the leaf litter that these communities consume is of particularly poor quality as indicated by elemental stoichiometry. The impact of resource quantity, quality, and other habitat parameters on species richness and biomass of consumer communities is often studied in isolation, although much can be learned from simultaneously studying both community characteristics...
May 15, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28502120/gut-microbial-communities-of-american-pikas-ochotona-princeps-evidence-for-phylosymbiosis-and-adaptations-to-novel-diets
#12
Kevin D Kohl, Johanna Varner, Jennifer L Wilkening, M Denise Dearing
1.Gut microbial communities provide many physiological functions to their hosts, especially in herbivorous animals. We still lack an understanding of how these microbial communities are structured across hosts in nature, especially within a given host species. Studies on laboratory mice have demonstrated that host genetics can influence microbial community structure, but that diet can overwhelm these genetic effects. 2.We aimed to test these ideas in a natural system, the American pika (Ochotona princeps). First, pikas are high elevation specialists with significant population structure across various mountain ranges in the USA, allowing us to investigate whether similarities in microbial communities match host genetic differences...
May 14, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28502118/the-role-of-rare-morph-advantage-and-conspicuousness-in-the-stable-gold-dark-colour-polymorphism-of-a-crater-lake-midas-cichlid-fish
#13
J Torres-Dowdall, J Golcher-Benavides, G Machado-Schiaffino, A Meyer
1.Genetically based stable colour polymorphisms provide a unique opportunity to study the evolutionary processes that preserve genetic variability in the wild. Different mechanisms are proposed to promote the stability of polymorphisms, but only few empirical examples have been documented, resulting in an incomplete understanding of these mechanisms. 2.A remarkable genetically-determined stable colour polymorphism is found in the Nicaraguan Midas cichlid species complex (Amphilophus cf. citrinellus). All Midas cichlids start their life with a dark-grey colouration (dark morph), but individuals carrying the dominant "gold" allele (~10%) lose their melanophores later in life, revealing the underlying orange colouration (gold morph)...
May 14, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28502109/reproductive-performance-of-resident-and-migrant-males-females-and-pairs-in-a-partially-migratory-bird
#14
Hannah Grist, Francis Daunt, Sarah Wanless, Sarah J Burthe, Mark A Newell, Mike P Harris, Jane M Reid
1.Quantifying among-individual variation in life-history strategies, and associated variation in reproductive performance and resulting demographic structure, is key to understanding and predicting population dynamics and life-history evolution. Partial migration, where populations comprise a mixture of resident and seasonally-migrant individuals, constitutes a dimension of life-history variation that could be associated with substantial variation in reproductive performance. However, such variation has rarely been quantified due to the challenge of measuring reproduction and migration across a sufficient number of seasonally-mobile males and females...
May 14, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28502084/conspecific-and-not-performance-based-attraction-on-immigrants-drives-colony-growth-in-a-waterbird
#15
Simone Tenan, Mauro Fasola, Stefano Volponi, Giacomo Tavecchia
Local recruitment and immigration play an important part in the dynamics and growth of animal populations. However, their estimation and incorporation into open populations models is, in most cases, problematic. We studied factors affecting the growth of a recently established colony of Eurasian spoonbill (Platalea leucorodia) and assessed the contribution of local recruits, i.e. birds born in the colony, and immigrants, i.e. birds of unknown origin, to colony growth. We applied an integrated population model that accounts for uncertainty in breeding state assignment and merges population surveys, local fecundity and individual longitudinal data of breeding and non-breeding birds, to estimate demographic rates and the relative role of recruitment and immigration in driving the local dynamics...
May 14, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28502082/desynchronizations-in-bee-plant-interactions-cause-severe-fitness-losses-in-solitary-bees
#16
Mariela Schenk, Jochen Krauss, Andrea Holzschuh
1.Global warming can disrupt mutualistic interactions between solitary bees and plants when increasing temperature differentially changes the timing of interacting partners. One possible scenario is for insect phenology to advance more rapidly than plant phenology. 2.However, empirical evidence for fitness consequences due to temporal mismatches is lacking for pollinators and it remains unknown if bees have developed strategies to mitigate fitness losses following temporal mismatches. 3.We tested the effect of temporal mismatches on the fitness of three spring-emerging solitary bee species, including one pollen specialist...
May 14, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28493450/functionally-specialised-birds-respond-flexibly-to-seasonal-changes-in-fruit-availability
#17
Irene M A Bender, W Daniel Kissling, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Isabell Hensen, Ingolf Kühn, Thorsten Wiegand, D Matthias Dehling, Matthias Schleuning
Interactions between resource and consumer species result in complex ecological networks. The overall structure of these networks is often stable in space and time, but little is known about the temporal stability of the functional roles of consumer species in these networks. We used a trait-based approach to investigate whether consumers (frugivorous birds) show similar degrees of functional specialisation on resources (plants) in ecological networks across seasons. We additionally tested whether closely related bird species have similar degrees of functional specialisation and whether birds that are functionally specialised on specific resource types within a season are flexible in switching to other resource types in other seasons...
May 10, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28481427/individual-versus-pseudo-repeatability-in-behaviour-lessons-from-translocation-experiments-in-a-wild-insect
#18
Petri T Niemelä, Niels J Dingemanse
1.Repeatability represents a key parameter in ecological and evolutionary research. Repeatability is underpinned by developmental plasticity and genetic variation but may become biased upwards by repeatable differences in environments to which individuals respond plastically. The extent of upward bias caused by the latter mechanism (causing "pseudo-repeatability") is important yet rarely investigated in ecological research. 2.We repeatedly assayed a key behaviour (flight initiation distance) affecting longevity in a wild cricket population (Gryllus campestris)...
May 8, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28481414/time-since-disturbance-affects-colonization-dynamics-in-a-metapopulation
#19
Jessie Mutz, Nora Underwood, Brian D Inouye
1.Disturbances are widespread in nature and can have substantial population-level consequences. Most empirical studies on the effects of disturbance track population recovery within habitat patches, but have an incomplete representation of the recolonization process. Additionally, recent metapopulation models represent post-disturbance colonization with a recovery state or time-lag for disturbed ("focal") patches, thus assuming that recolonization rates are uniform. 2.However, the availability of colonists in neighboring "source" patches can vary, especially in frequently-disturbed landscapes such as fire-managed forests that have a mosaic of patches that differ in successional state and undergo frequent local extinctions...
May 8, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28466477/winter-chilling-speeds-spring-development-of-temperate-butterflies
#20
Sandra Stålhandske, Karl Gotthard, Olof Leimar
Understanding and predicting phenology has become more important with ongoing climate change and has brought about great research efforts in the recent decades. The majority of studies examining spring phenology of insects have focussed on the effects of spring temperatures alone. Here we use citizen-collected observation data to show that winter cold duration, in addition to spring temperature, can affect the spring emergence of butterflies. Using spatial mixed models, we disentangle the effects of climate variables and reveal impacts of both spring and winter conditions for five butterfly species that overwinter as pupae across the UK, with data from 1976 to 2013 and one butterfly species in Sweden, with data from 2001 to 2013...
May 2, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
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