journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Journal of Animal Ecology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425582/personality-immune-response-and-reproductive-success-an-appraisal-of-the-pace-of-life-syndrome-hypothesis
#1
Karine Monceau, François-Xavier Dechaume-Moncharmont, Jérôme Moreau, Camille Lucas, Rémi Capoduro, Sébastien Motreuil, Yannick Moret
The pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis is an extended concept of the life history theory that includes behavioural traits. The studies challenging the POLS hypothesis often focus on the relationships between a single personality trait and a physiological and/or life history traits. While pathogens represent a major selective pressure, few studies have been interested in testing relationships between behavioural syndrome, and several fitness components including immunity. The aim of this study is to address this question in the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, a model species in immunity studies...
April 20, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28423183/long-term-species-loss-and-homogenization-of-moth-communities-in-central-europe
#2
Anu Valtonen, Anikó Hirka, Levente Szőcs, Matthew P Ayres, Heikki Roininen, György Csóka
As global biodiversity continues to decline steeply, it is becoming increasingly important to understand diversity patterns at local and regional scales. Changes in land use and climate, nitrogen deposition and invasive species are the most important threats to global biodiversity. Because land use changes tend to benefit a few species but impede many, the expected outcome is generally decreasing population sizes, decreasing species richness at local and regional scales, and increasing similarity of species compositions across sites (biotic homogenization)...
April 19, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28415137/drivers-of-species-role-in-avian-seed-dispersal-mutualistic-networks
#3
Esther Sebastián-González
The mutualistic interaction between frugivore birds and the fruiting plants they disperse presents an asymmetric interaction pattern, with some species having a more important role (i.e. being essential) for maintaining the structure and functioning of the interaction network. The identification of the biological characteristics of these species is of major importance for the understanding and conservation of seed-dispersal interactions. In this study, I use a network approach and avian seed-dispersal networks from 23 different geographical areas to test 5 hypotheses about species characteristics determining the structure of the assemblage...
April 17, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28415134/an-arctic-predator-prey-system-in-flux-climate-change-impacts-on-coastal-space-use-by-polar-bears-and-ringed-seals
#4
Charmain D Hamilton, Kit M Kovacs, Rolf A Ims, Jon Aars, Christian Lydersen
1.Climate change is impacting different species at different rates, leading to alterations in biological interactions with ramifications for wider ecosystem functioning. Understanding these alterations can help improve predictive capacity and inform management efforts designed to mitigate against negative impacts. 2.We investigated how the movement and space use patterns of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in coastal areas in Svalbard, Norway, have been altered by a sudden decline in sea ice that occurred in 2006...
April 17, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28393353/individual-heterogeneity-determines-sex-differences-in-mortality-in-a-monogamous-bird-with-reversed-sexual-dimorphism
#5
Fernando Colchero, Alix Eva Aliaga, Owen Jones, Dalia Amor Conde
1.Sex differences in mortality are pervasive in vertebrates, and usually result in shorter life spans in the larger sex, although the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. On the other hand, differences in frailty among individuals (i.e. individual heterogeneity), can play a major role in shaping demographic trajectories in wild populations. The link between these two processes has seldom been explored. 2.We used Bayesian survival trajectory analysis to study age-specific mortality trajectories in the Eurasian sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus), a monogamous raptor with reversed sexual size dimorphism...
April 9, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28393352/fine-scale-population-dynamics-in-a-marine-fish-species-inferred-from-dynamic-state-space-models
#6
Lauren A Rogers, Geir O Storvik, Halvor Knutsen, Esben M Olsen, Nils Chr Stenseth
1.Identifying the spatial scale of population structuring is critical for the conservation of natural populations and for drawing accurate ecological inferences. However, population studies often use spatially aggregated data to draw inferences about population trends and drivers, potentially masking ecologically relevant population sub-structure and dynamics. 2.The goals of this study were to investigate how population dynamics models with and without spatial structure affect inferences on population trends and the identification of intrinsic drivers of population dynamics (e...
April 9, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390110/functional-responses-in-animal-movement-explain-spatial-heterogeneity-in-animal-habitat-relationships
#7
Tom H E Mason, Daniel Fortin
1.Understanding why heterogeneity exists in animal-habitat spatial relationships is critical for identifying the drivers of animal distributions. Functional responses in habitat selection - whereby animals adjust their habitat selection depending on habitat availability - are useful for describing animal-habitat spatial heterogeneity. However, they could be yielded by different movement tactics, involving contrasting inter-specific interactions. 2.Identifying functional responses in animal movement, rather than in emergent spatial patterns like habitat selection, could disentangle the effects of different movement behaviours on spatial heterogeneity in animal-habitat relationships...
April 8, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390066/the-many-faces-of-fear-a-synthesis-of-the-methodological-variation-in-characterizing-predation-risk
#8
REVIEW
Remington J Moll, Kyle M Redilla, Tutilo Mudumba, Arthur B Muneza, Steven M Gray, Leandro Abade, Matt W Hayward, Joshua J Millspaugh, Robert A Montgomery
1.Predators affect prey by killing them directly (lethal effects) and by inducing costly antipredator behaviors in living prey (risk effects). Risk effects can strongly influence prey populations and cascade through trophic systems. A prerequisite for assessing risk effects is characterizing the spatiotemporal variation in predation risk. 2.Risk effects research has experienced rapid growth in the last several decades. However, preliminary assessments of the resultant literature suggest that researchers characterize predation risk using a variety of techniques...
April 8, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390059/benefits-of-the-destinations-not-costs-of-the-journeys-shape-partial-migration-patterns
#9
Charles B Yackulic, Stephen Blake, Guillaume Bastille-Rousseau
1.The reasons that lead some animals to seasonally migrate, and others to remain in the same area year-round, are poorly understood. Associations between traits, such as body size, and migration provide clues. For example, larger species and individuals are more likely to migrate. 2.One explanation for this size bias in migration is that larger animals are capable of moving faster (movement hypothesis). However, body size is linked to many other biological processes. For instance, the energetic balances of larger animals are generally more sensitive to variation in food density because of body size effects on foraging and metabolism and this sensitivity could drive migratory decisions (forage hypothesis)...
April 8, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28378393/multi-modal-defenses-in-aphids-offer-redundant-protection-and-increased-costs-likely-impeding-a-protective-mutualism
#10
Adam J Martinez, Matthew R Doremus, Laura J Kraft, Kyungsun L Kim, Kerry M Oliver
1.The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, maintains extreme variation in resistance to its most common parasitoid wasp enemy, Aphidius ervi, which is sourced from two known mechanisms: protective bacterial symbionts, most commonly Hamiltonella defensa, or endogenously encoded defenses. We have recently found that individual aphids may employ each defense individually, occasionally both defenses together, or neither. 2.In field populations, Hamiltonella-infected aphids are found at low to moderate frequencies and while less is known about the frequency of resistant genotypes, they show up less often than susceptible genotypes in field collections...
April 5, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28378359/the-causes-of-dispersal-and-the-cost-of-carryover-effects-for-an-endangered-bird-in-a-dynamic-wetland-landscape
#11
Ellen P Robertson, Robert J Fletcher, James D Austin
1.The decision to disperse or remain philopatric between breeding seasons has important implications for both ecology and evolution, including the potential for carryover effects, where an individual's previous history affects their current performance. Carryover effects are increasingly documented although underlying mechanisms remain unclear. 2.Here we test for potential carryover effects and their mechanisms by uniting hypotheses for the causes and consequences of habitat selection and dispersal across space and time...
April 5, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28369891/a-framework-for-modeling-range-shifts-and-migrations-asking-whether-whither-when-and-will-it-return
#12
Eliezer Gurarie, Francesca Cagnacci, Wibke Peters, Chris Fleming, Justin M Calabrese, Thomas Müller, William F Fagan
Many animals undertake movements that are longer-scaled and more directed than their typical home ranging behavior. Most notably, these movements include seasonal migrations (e.g. between breeding and feeding grounds), but also natal dispersal, nomadic range shifts, and responses to local environmental disruptions. While various heuristic tools exist for identifying range shifts and migrations, none explicitly model the movement of the animals within a statistical framework that facilitates quantitative comparisons...
April 1, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28369906/the-effects-of-ant-nests-on-soil-fertility-and-plant-performance-a-meta-analysis
#13
Alejandro G Farji-Brener, Victoria Werenkraut
Ants are recognized as one of the major sources of soil disturbance worldwide. However, this view is largely based on isolated studies and qualitative reviews. Here, for the first time, we quantitatively determined whether ant nests affect soil fertility and plant performance, and identified the possible sources of variation of these effects. Using Bayesian mixed-models meta-analysis we tested the hypotheses that ant effects on soil fertility and plant performance depend on the substrate sampled, ant feeding type, latitude, habitat and the plant response variable measured...
March 31, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28342283/effects-of-predatory-ants-within-and-across-ecosystems-in-bromeliad-food-webs
#14
Ana Z Gonçalves, Diane S Srivastava, Paulo S Oliveira, Gustavo Q Romero
Predation is one of the most fundamental ecological processes affecting biotic communities. Terrestrial predators that live at ecosystem boundaries may alter the diversity of terrestrial organisms, but they may also have cross-ecosystem cascading effects when they feed on organisms with complex life cycles (i.e., organisms that shift from aquatic juvenile stages to terrestrial adult stages) or inhibit female oviposition in the aquatic environment. The predatory ant Odontomachus hastatus establishes its colonies among roots of Vriesea procera, an epiphytic bromeliad species with water-filled tanks that shelters many terrestrial and aquatic organisms...
March 25, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28342281/incorporating-in-situ-habitat-patchiness-in-site-selection-models-reveals-that-site-fidelity-is-not-always-a-consequence-of-animal-choice
#15
Aline S Martinez, Eduardo V Queiroz, Mitch Bryson, Maria Byrne, Ross A Coleman
1.Understanding site fidelity is important in animal ecology, but evidence is lacking that this behaviour is due to an animal choosing a specific location. To discern site selection behaviour it is necessary to consider the spatial distribution of habitats that animals can occupy within a landscape. Tracking animals and defining clear habitat boundaries, however, is often difficult. 2.We use in situ habitat distribution data and animal movement simulations to investigate behavioural choice in site fidelity patterns...
March 25, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28342277/climatic-variation-modulates-the-indirect-effects-of-large-herbivores-on-small-mammal-habitat-use
#16
Ryan A Long, Alois Wambua, Jacob R Goheen, Todd M Palmer, Robert M Pringle
Large mammalian herbivores (LMH) strongly shape the composition and architecture of plant communities. A growing literature shows that negative direct effects of LMH on vegetation frequently propagate to suppress the abundance of smaller consumers. Indirect effects of LMH on the behaviour of these consumers, however, have received comparatively little attention despite their potential ecological significance. We sought to understand (i) how LMH indirectly shape small-mammal habitat use by altering the density and distribution of understory plants; (ii) how these effects vary with climatic context (here, seasonality in rainfall); and (iii) the extent to which behavioural responses of small mammals are contingent upon small-mammal density...
March 25, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326539/isotopic-niche-partitioning-between-two-apex-predators-over-time
#17
M Drago, L Cardona, V Franco-Trecu, E A Crespo, D Vales, F Borella, L Zenteno, E M Gonzáles, P Inchausti
1.Stable isotope analyses have become an important tool in reconstructing diets, analyzing resource use patterns, elucidating trophic relations among predators and understanding the structure of food webs. 2.Here, we use stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in bone collagen to reconstruct and compare the isotopic niches of adult South American fur seals (Arctocephalus australis; n = 86) and sea lions (Otaria flavescens; n = 49) -two otariid species with marked morphological differences- in the Río de la Plata estuary (Argentina - Uruguay) and the adjacent Atlantic Ocean during the second half of the 20(th) century and the beginning of the 21(st) century...
March 22, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326538/integrating-lipid-storage-into-general-representations-of-fish-energetics
#18
Benjamin T Martin, Ron Heintz, Eric M Danner, Roger M Nisbet
1.Fish, even of the same species, can exhibit substantial variation in energy density (energy per unit wet weight). Most of this variation is due to differences in the amount of storage lipids. In addition to their importance as energy reserves for reproduction and for survival during unfavorable conditions, the accumulation of lipids represents a large energetic flux for many species, so figuring out how this energy flux is integrated with other major energy fluxes (growth, reproduction) is critical for any general theory of organismal energetics...
March 22, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317105/the-benefits-of-coinfection-trematodes-alter-disease-outcomes-associated-with-virus-infection
#19
Vanessa P Wuerthner, Jessica Hua, Jason T Hoverman
1.Coinfections are increasingly recognized as important drivers of disease dynamics. Consequently, greater emphasis has been placed on integrating principles from community ecology with disease ecology to understand within-host interactions among parasites. Using larval amphibians and two amphibian parasites (ranaviruses and the trematode Echinoparyphium sp.), we examined the influence of coinfection on disease outcomes. 2.Our first objective was to examine how priority effects (the timing and sequence of parasite exposure) influence infection and disease outcomes in the laboratory...
March 20, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317104/contact-and-contagion-bighorn-sheep-demographic-states-vary-in-probability-of-transmission-given-contact
#20
Kezia R Manlove, E Frances Cassirer, Raina K Plowright, Paul C Cross, Peter J Hudson
1.Understanding both contact and probability of transmission given contact are key to managing wildlife disease. However, wildlife disease research tends to focus on contact heterogeneity, in part because probability of transmission given contact is notoriously difficult to measure. Here we present a first step toward empirically investigating probability of transmission given contact in free-ranging wildlife. 2.We used measured contact networks to test whether bighorn sheep demographic states vary systematically in infectiousness or susceptibility to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, an agent responsible for bighorn sheep pneumonia...
March 20, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
journal
journal
23968
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"