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Journal of Animal Ecology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28636751/using-experimentation-to-understand-the-10-year-snowshoe-hare-cycle-in-the-boreal-forest-of-north-america
#1
C J Krebs, R Boonstra, S Boutin
Population cycles have long fascinated ecologists from the time of Charles Elton in the 1920s. The discovery of large population fluctuations in undisturbed ecosystems challenged the idea that pristine nature was in a state of balance. The 10-year cycle of snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus Erxleben) across the boreal forests of Canada and Alaska is a classic cycle, recognized by fur traders for more than 300 years. Since the 1930s ecologists have investigated the mechanisms that might cause these cycles. Proposed causal mechanisms have varied from sunspots to food supplies, parasites, diseases, predation, and social behaviour...
June 21, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28636171/pulsed-food-resources-but-not-forest-cover-determines-lifetime-reproductive-success-in-a-forest-dwelling-rodent
#2
Katrine S Hoset, Alexandre Villers, Ralf Wistbacka, Vesa Selonen
1.The relative contributions of habitat and food availability on fitness may provide evidence for key habitat features needed to safeguard population persistence. However, defining habitat quality for a species can be a complex task, especially if knowledge on the relationship between individual performance and habitat quality is lacking. 2.Here, we determined the relative importance of availability of suitable forest habitat, body mass, and food from masting tree species on female lifetime reproductive success (LRS) of Siberian flying squirrels (Pteromys volans)...
June 21, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28626934/thermal-phsyiology-a-new-dimension-of-the-pace-of-life-syndrome
#3
C T Goulet, M B Thompson, M Michelangeli, B B M Wong, D G Chapple
1.Current syndrome research focuses primarily on behavior with few incorporating components of physiology. One such syndrome is the Pace-of-Life Syndrome (POLS) which describes covariation between behaviour, metabolism immunity, hormonal response, and life history traits. Despite the strong effect temperature has on behavior, thermal physiology has yet to be considered within this syndrome framework. 2.We proposed the POLS to be extended to include a new dimension, the cold-hot axis. Under this premise, it is predicted that thermal physiology and behavior would covary whereby individual positioning along the thermal continuum would coincide with that of the behavioral continuum...
June 19, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28609555/carnivore-carcasses-are-avoided-by-carnivores
#4
Marcos Moleón, Carlos Martínez-Carrasco, Oliver C Muellerklein, Wayne M Getz, Carlos Muñoz-Lozano, José A Sánchez-Zapata
1. Ecologists have traditionally focused on herbivore carcasses as study models in scavenging research. However, some observations of scavengers avoiding feeding on carnivore carrion suggest that different types of carrion may lead to differential pressures. Untested assumptions about carrion produced at different trophic levels could therefore lead ecologists to overlook important evolutionary processes and their ecological consequences. 2. Our general goal was to investigate the use of mammalian carnivore carrion by vertebrate scavengers...
June 13, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28605018/contrasting-drivers-of-reproductive-ageing-in-albatrosses
#5
Hannah Froy, Sue Lewis, Daniel H Nussey, Andrew G Wood, Richard A Phillips
1.Age-related variation in reproductive performance is ubiquitous in wild vertebrate populations and has important consequences for population and evolutionary dynamics. 2.The ageing trajectory is shaped by both within-individual processes, such as improvement and senescence, and by the among-individual effects of selective appearance and disappearance. To date, few studies have compared the role of these different drivers among species or populations. 3.In this study, we use nearly 40 years of longitudinal monitoring data to contrast the within- and among-individual processes contributing to the reproductive ageing patterns in three albatross species (two biennial and one annual breeder), and test whether these can be explained by differences in life-histories...
June 12, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28605016/flexibility-in-the-duration-of-parental-care-female-leopards-prioritise-cub-survival-over-reproductive-output
#6
Guy A Balme, Hugh S Robinson, Ross T Pitman, Luke T B Hunter
1.Deciding when to terminate care of offspring is a key consideration for parents. Prolonging care may increase fitness of current offspring, but it can also reduce opportunities for future reproduction. Despite its evolutionary importance, few studies have explored the optimal duration of parental care, particularly among large carnivores. 2.We used a 40-year dataset to assess the trade-offs associated with the length of maternal care in leopards in the Sabi Sand Game Reserve, South Africa. We compared the costs imposed by care on the survival and residual reproductive value of leopard mothers against the benefits derived from maternal care in terms of increased offspring survival, recruitment and reproduction...
June 12, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28605012/advancing-research-on-animal-transported-subsidies-by-integrating-animal-movement-and-ecosystem-modeling
#7
Julia E Earl, Patrick A Zollner
1.Connections between ecosystems via animals (active subsidies) support ecosystem services and contribute to numerous ecological effects. Thus, the ability to predict the spatial distribution of active subsidies would be useful for ecology and conservation. 2.Previous work modeling active subsidies focused on implicit space or static distributions, which treat passive and active subsidies similarly. Active subsidies are fundamentally different from passive subsidies, because animals can respond to the process of subsidy deposition and ecosystem changes caused by subsidy deposition...
June 12, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28556189/reorganization-of-interaction-networks-modulates-the-persistence-of-species-in-late-successional-stages
#8
Serguei Saavedra, Simone Cenci, Ek Del-Val, Karina Boege, Rudolf P Rohr
1.Ecological interaction networks constantly reorganize as interspecific interactions change across successional stages and environmental gradients. This reorganization can also be associated with the extent to which species change their preference for types of niches available in their local sites. Despite the pervasiveness of these interaction changes, previous studies have revealed that network reorganizations have a minimal or insignificant effect on global descriptors of network architecture, such as: connectance, modularity, and nestedness...
May 29, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28556095/the-microbiota-of-diapause-how-host-microbe-associations-are-formed-after-dormancy-in-an-aquatic-crustacean
#9
Alexandra A Mushegian, Jean-Claude Walser, Karen E Sullam, Dieter Ebert
1.A critical question in symbiosis research is where and how organisms obtain beneficial microbial symbionts in different ecological contexts. Microbiota of juveniles are often derived directly from their mother or from the immediate environment. The origin of beneficial symbionts, however, is less obvious in organisms with diapause and dispersal stages, such as plants with dormant seeds and animals in ephemeral or strongly seasonal habitats. In these cases, parents and offspring are separated in time and space, which may affect opportunities for both vertical and horizontal transmission of symbionts...
May 29, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28555881/parasite-microbiota-interactions-potentially-affect-intestinal-communities-in-wild-mammals
#10
Tuomas Aivelo, Anna Norberg
1.Detecting interaction between species is notoriously difficult, and disentangling species associations in host-related gut communities is especially challenging. Nevertheless, due to contemporary methods, including metabarcoding and 16S sequencing, collecting observational data on community composition has become easier and much more common. 2.We studied the previously collected data sets of intestinal bacterial microbiota and parasite compositions within longitudinally followed mouse lemurs by analysing the potential interactions with diversity metrics and novel joint species distribution modelling...
May 27, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28555834/effects-of-breeder-turnover-and-harvest-on-group-composition-and-recruitment-in-a-social-carnivore
#11
David E Ausband, Michael S Mitchell, Lisette P Waits
1.Breeder turnover can influence population growth in social carnivores through changes to group size, composition, and recruitment. 2.Studies that possess detailed group composition data that can provide insights about the effects of breeder turnover on groups have generally been conducted on species that are not subject to recurrent annual human harvest. We wanted to know how breeder turnover affects group composition and how harvest, in turn, affects breeder turnover in cooperatively breeding gray wolves (Canis lupus Linnaeus 1758)...
May 27, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543867/an-age-dependent-fitness-cost-of-migration-old-trans-saharan-migrating-spoonbills-breed-later-than-those-staying-in-europe-and-late-breeders-have-lower-recruitment
#12
Tamar Lok, Linde Veldhoen, Otto Overdijk, Joost M Tinbergen, Theunis Piersma
Migration is a widespread phenomenon in the animal kingdom. On the basis of the considerable variation that exists between and within species, and even within populations, we may be able to infer the (age- and sex-specific) ecological trade-offs and constraints moulding migration systems from assessments of fitness associated with migration and wintering in different areas. During three consecutive breeding seasons, we compared the reproductive performance (timing of breeding, breeding success, chick body condition and post-fledging survival) of Eurasian spoonbills Platalea leucorodia that breed at a single breeding site in The Netherlands, but migrate different distances (ca...
May 25, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542979/consequences-of-symbiont-co-infections-for-insect-host-phenotypes
#13
Ailsa H C McLean, Benjamin J Parker, Jan Hrček, James Kavanagh, Peter A D Wellham, H Charles J Godfray
1.Most animals host communities of symbiotic bacteria. In insects, these symbionts may have particularly intimate interactions with their hosts: many are intracellular and can play important roles in host ecology and evolution, including protection against natural enemies. 2.We investigated how interactions between different species or strains of endosymbiotic bacteria within an aphid host influence the outcome of symbiosis for both symbiont and host. 3.We first asked whether different combinations of facultative symbiont species or strains can exist in stable co-infections...
May 25, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543058/shallow-size-density-relations-within-mammal-clades-suggest-greater-intra-guild-ecological-impact-of-large-bodied-species
#14
R Ø Pedersen, S Faurby, J-C Svenning
1.Population densities of species have a predictable relationship to their body mass on a global scale. This relationship is known as the size-density relationship. The relationship was originally found to be directly opposite of metabolic rate scaling, which led to the hypothesis of energetic equivalence. However, recent studies have suggested that the size-density relationship varies between clades. Specifically, the size-density relationship for certain mammal clades has been found to be less negative than the relationship across all mammals...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543048/estimating-demographic-contributions-to-effective-population-size-in-an-age-structured-wild-population-experiencing-environmental-and-demographic-stochasticity
#15
Amanda E Trask, Eric M Bignal, Davy I McCracken, Stuart B Piertney, Jane M Reid
1.A population's effective size (Ne ) is a key parameter that shapes rates of inbreeding and loss of genetic diversity, thereby influencing evolutionary processes and population viability. However estimating Ne , and identifying key demographic mechanisms that underlie the Ne to census population size (N) ratio, remains challenging, especially for small populations with overlapping generations and substantial environmental and demographic stochasticity and hence dynamic age-structure. 2.A sophisticated demographic method of estimating Ne /N, which uses Fisher's reproductive value to account for dynamic age-structure, has been formulated...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542896/diverse-responses-of-species-to-landscape-fragmentation-in-a-simple-food-chain
#16
Jinbao Liao, Daniel Bearup, Bernd Blasius
1.Habitat destruction, characterized by habitat loss and fragmentation, is a key driver of species extinction in spatial extended communities. Recently, there has been some progress in the theory of spatial food webs, however to date practically little is known about how habitat configurational fragmentation influences multi-trophic food web dynamics. 2.To explore how habitat fragmentation affects species persistence in food webs, we introduce a modelling framework that describes the site occupancy of species in a tri-trophic system...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543388/environmental-constraints-on-the-compositional-and-phylogenetic-beta-diversity-of-tropical-forest-snake-assemblages
#17
Mario R Moura, Henrique C Costa, Antônio J S Argôlo, Walter Jetz
The ongoing biodiversity crisis increases the importance and urgency of studies addressing the role of environmental variation on the composition and evolutionary history of species assemblages, but especially the tropics and ectotherms remain understudied. In regions with rainy summers, coexistence of ectothermic species may be determined by the partitioning of the climatic niche, since ectotherms can rely on water availability and thermoregulatory behaviour to buffer constraints along their climatic niche...
May 22, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543273/differential-dispersal-and-the-allee-effect-create-power-law-behavior-distribution-of-spot-infestations-during-mountain-pine-beetle-outbreaks
#18
James A Powell, Martha J Garlick, Barbara J Bentz, Nicholas Friedenberg
Mountain pine beetles (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) are aggressive insects attacking Pinus host trees. Pines use defensive resin to overwhelm attackers, creating an Allee effect requiring beetles to attack en masse to successfully reproduce. MPB kill hosts, leaving observable, dying trees with red needles. Landscape patterns of infestation depend on MPB dispersal, which decreases with host density. Away from contiguously impacted patches (low beetle densities), infestations are characterized by apparently random spots (of 1-10 trees)...
May 22, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542919/context-dependent-colonization-dynamics-regional-reward-contagion-drives-local-compression-in-aquatic-beetles
#19
Matthew R Pintar, William J Resetarits
1.Habitat selection by colonizing organisms is an important factor in determining species abundance and community dynamics at multiple spatial scales. Many organisms select habitat patches based on intrinsic patch quality, but patches exist in complex landscapes linked by dispersal and colonization, forming metapopulations and metacommunities. Perceived patch quality can be influenced by neighboring patches through spatial contagion, wherein perceived quality of one patch can extend beyond its borders and either increase or decrease the colonization of neighboring patches and localities...
May 19, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542901/mechanisms-and-implications-of-a-type-iv-functional-response-for-short-term-intake-rate-of-dry-matter-in-large-mammalian-herbivores
#20
J C Mezzalira, O J F Bonnet, P C de F Carvalho, L Fonseca, C Bremm, C C Mezzalira, E A Laca
1.The functional response (i.e. the relationship between consumers' intake rate and resource density) is central in plant-herbivore interactions. Its shape and the biological processes leading to it have significant implications for both foraging theory and ecology of grazing systems. 2.A type IV functional response (i.e. dome-shaped relationship) of short-term intake rate of dry matter (intake while grazing) has rarely been reported for large herbivores and the conditions that can lead to it are poorly understood...
May 19, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
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