journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Journal of Animal Ecology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29282715/dynamic-occupancy-modeling-reveals-a-hierarchy-of-competition-among-fishers-gray-foxes-and-ringtails
#1
David S Green, Sean M Matthews, Robert C Swiers, Richard L Callas, J Scott Yaeger, Stuart Farber, Michael K Schwartz, Roger A Powell
1.Determining how species coexist is critical for understanding functional diversity, niche partitioning and interspecific interactions. Identifying the direct and indirect interactions among sympatric carnivores that enable their coexistence are particularly important to elucidate because they are integral for maintaining ecosystem function. 2.We studied the effects of removing 9 fishers (Pekania pennanti) on their population dynamics and used this perturbation to elucidate the interspecific interactions among fishers, gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), and ringtails (Bassariscus astutus)...
December 28, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29282711/more-invaders-do-not-result-in-heavier-impacts-the-effects-of-nonnative-bullfrogs-on-native-anurans-are-mitigated-by-high-densities-of-nonnative-crayfish
#2
Xuan Liu, Supen Wang, Zunwei Ke, Chaoyuan Cheng, Yihua Wang, Fang Zhang, Feng Xu, Xianping Li, Xu Gao, Changnan Jin, Wei Zhu, Shaofei Yan, Yiming Li
1.With accelerating species introductions in an era of globalization, co-occurring alien species have become increasingly common. Understanding the combined ecological impacts of multiple invaders is not only crucial for wildlife managers attempting to ameliorate biodiversity loss but also provides key insights into invasion success and species coexistence mechanisms in natural ecosystems. Compared with much attentions given to single invader impacts, little is known about the impacts of multiple co-occurring invaders...
December 28, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29277890/rethinking-normal-the-role-of-stochasticity-in-the-phenology-of-a-synchronously-breeding-seabird
#3
Casey Youngflesh, Stephanie Jenouvrier, Jefferson T Hinke, Lauren DuBois, Judy St Leger, Wayne Z Trivelpiece, Susan G Trivelpiece, Heather J Lynch
1.Phenological changes have been observed in a variety of systems over the past century. There is concern that, as a consequence, ecological interactions are becoming increasingly mismatched in time, with negative consequences for ecological function. 2.Significant spatial heterogeneity (inter-site) and temporal variability (inter-annual) can make it difficult to separate intrinsic, extrinsic, and stochastic drivers of phenological variability. The goal of this study was to understand the timing and variability of breeding phenology of Adélie penguins under fixed environmental conditions, and to use those data to identify a 'null model' appropriate for disentangling the sources of variation in wild populations...
December 26, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29247466/disease-implications-of-animal-social-network-structure-a-synthesis-across-social-systems
#4
REVIEW
Pratha Sah, Janet Mann, Shweta Bansal
1.The disease costs of sociality have largely been understood through the link between group size and transmission. However, infectious disease spread is driven primarily by the social organization of interactions in a group and not its size. 2.We used statistical models to review the social network organization of 47 species, including mammals, birds, reptiles, fish and insects by categorizing each species into one of three social systems, relatively solitary, gregarious and socially hierarchical. Additionally, using computational experiments of infection spread, we determined the disease costs of each social system...
December 15, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29243250/a-camera-based-method-for-estimating-absolute-density-in-animals-displaying-home-range-behaviour
#5
Andrea Campos-Candela, Miquel Palmer, Salvador Balle, Josep Alós
1.The measurement of animal density may take advantage of recent technological achievements in wildlife video recording. Fostering the theoretical links between the patterns depicted by cameras and absolute density is required to exploit this potential. 2.We explore the applicability of the Hutchinson-Waser's postulate (i.e., when animal density is stationary at a given temporal and spatial scale, the absolute density is given by the average number of animals counted per frame), which is a counter-intuitive statement for most ecologists and managers who are concerned with counting the same individual more than once...
December 15, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29205327/social-behaviour-and-gut-microbiota-in-red-bellied-lemurs-eulemur-rubriventer-in-search-of-the-role-of-immunity-in-the-evolution-of-sociality
#6
Aura Raulo, Lasse Ruokolainen, Avery Lane, Katherine Amato, Rob Knight, Steven Leigh, Rebecca Stumpf, Bryan White, Karen E Nelson, Andrea L Baden, Stacey R Tecot
Vertebrate gut microbiota form a key component of immunity and a dynamic link between an individual and the ecosystem. Microbiota might play a role in social systems as well, because microbes are transmitted during social contact and can affect host behaviour. Combining methods from behavioural and molecular research, we describe the relationship between social dynamics and gut microbiota of a group-living cooperative species of primate, the red-bellied lemur (Eulemur rubriventer). Specifically, we ask whether patterns of social contact (group membership, group size, position in social network, individual sociality) are associated with patterns of gut microbial composition (diversity and similarity) between individuals and across time...
December 5, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29119557/understanding-the-role-of-parasites-in-food-webs-using-the-group-model
#7
Matthew J Michalska-Smith, Elizabeth L Sander, Mercedes Pascual, Stefano Allesina
1.Parasites are ubiquitous and have been shown to influence macroscopic measures of ecological network structure, such as connectance and robustness, as well as local structure, such as subgraph frequencies. Nevertheless, they are often underrepresented in ecological studies due to their small size and often complex life cycles. 2.We consider whether or not parasites play structurally unique roles in ecological networks; that is, can we distinguish parasites from other species using network structure alone? 3...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29111601/active-migration-is-associated-with-specific-and-consistent-changes-to-gut-microbiota-in-calidris-shorebirds
#8
Alice Risely, David Waite, Beata Ujvari, Bethany Hoye, Marcel Klaassen
1.Gut microbes are increasingly recognised for their role in regulating an animal's metabolism and immunity. However, identifying repeatable associations between host physiological processes and their gut microbiota has proved challenging, in part because microbial communities often respond stochastically to host physiological stress (e.g. fasting, forced exercise or infection). 2.Migratory birds provide a valuable system in which to test host-microbe interactions under physiological extremes because these hosts are adapted to predictable metabolic and immunological challenges as they undergo seasonal migrations, including temporary gut atrophy during long-distance flights...
November 7, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29111599/experimental-investigation-of-alternative-transmission-functions-quantitative-evidence-for-the-importance-of-non-linear-transmission-dynamics-in-host-parasite-systems
#9
Sarah A Orlofske, Samuel M Flaxman, Maxwell B Joseph, Andy Fenton, Brett A Melbourne, Pieter T J Johnson
1.Understanding pathogen transmission is crucial for predicting and managing disease. Nonetheless, experimental comparisons of alternative functional forms of transmission remain rare, and those experiments that are conducted are often not designed to test the full range of possible forms. 2.To differentiate among ten candidate transmission functions, we used a novel experimental design in which we independently varied four factors-duration of exposure, numbers of parasites, numbers of hosts, and parasite density-in laboratory infection experiments...
November 7, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29111567/a-computer-vision-for-animal-ecology
#10
REVIEW
Ben G Weinstein
1.A central goal of animal ecology is to observe species in the natural world. The cost and challenge of data collection often limit the breadth and scope of ecological study. Ecologists often use image capture to bolster data collection in time and space. However, the ability to process these images remains a bottleneck. 2.Computer vision can greatly increase the efficiency, repeatability, and accuracy of image review. Computer vision uses image features, such as color, shape, and texture to infer image content...
November 7, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29105758/why-are-tropical-mountain-passes-low-for-some-species-genetic-and-stable-isotope-tests-for-differentiation-migration-and-expansion-in-elevational-generalist-songbirds
#11
Chauncey R Gadek, Seth D Newsome, Elizabeth J Beckman, Andrea N Chavez, Spencer C Galen, Emil Bautista, Christopher C Witt
1.Most tropical bird species have narrow elevational ranges, likely reflecting climatic specialization. This is consistent with Janzen's Rule, the tendency for mountain passes to be effectively 'higher' in the tropics. Hence, those few tropical species that occur across broad elevational gradients (elevational generalists) represent a contradiction to Janzen's Rule. 2.Here we aim to address the following questions. Are elevational generalists being sundered by diversifying selection along the gradient? Does elevational movement cause these species to resist diversification or specialization? Have they recently expanded, suggesting that elevational generalism is short-lived in geological time? 3...
November 6, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29095486/critical-disease-windows-shaped-by-stress-exposure-alter-allocation-trade-offs-between-development-and-immunity
#12
Lucas J Kirschman, Erica J Crespi, Robin W Warne
1.Ubiquitous environmental stressors are often thought to alter animal susceptibility to pathogens and contribute to disease emergence. However, duration of exposure to a stressor is likely critical, because while chronic stress is often immunosuppressive, acute stress can temporarily enhance immune function. Furthermore, host susceptibility to stress and disease often varies with ontogeny; increasing during critical developmental windows. How the duration and timing of exposure to stressors interact to shape critical windows and influence disease processes is not well tested...
November 2, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29083030/a-practical-guide-for-inferring-reliable-dominance-hierarchies-and-estimating-their-uncertainty
#13
Alfredo Sánchez-Tójar, Julia Schroeder, Damien R Farine
1.Many animal social structures are organized hierarchically, with dominant individuals monopolizing resources. Dominance hierarchies have received great attention from behavioural and evolutionary ecologists. 2.There are many methods for inferring hierarchies from social interactions. Yet, there are no clear guidelines about how many observed dominance interactions (i.e. sampling effort) are necessary for inferring reliable dominance hierarchies, nor are there any established tools for quantifying their uncertainty...
October 30, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29063588/optimising-lifetime-reproductive-output-intermittent-breeding-as-a-tactic-for-females-in-a-long-lived-multiparous-mammal
#14
Marine Desprez, Olivier Gimenez, Clive R McMahon, Mark A Hindell, Robert G Harcourt
1.In iteroparous species, intermittent breeding is an important life-history tactic that can greatly affect animal population growth and viability. Despite its importance, few studies have quantified the consequences of breeding pauses on lifetime reproductive output, principally because calculating lifetime reproductive output requires knowledge of each individual's entire reproductive history. This information is extremely difficult to obtain in wild populations. 2.We applied novel statistical approaches that account for uncertainty in state assessment and individual heterogeneity to an 18-year capture-recapture dataset of 6 631 female southern elephant seals from Macquarie Island...
October 24, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29055094/divergent-migration-within-lake-sturgeon-acipenser-fulvescens-populations-multiple-distinct-patterns-exist-across-an-unrestricted-migration-corridor
#15
S T Kessel, D W Hondorp, C M Holbrook, J C Boase, J A Chiotti, M V Thomas, T C Wills, E F Roseman, R Drouin, C C Krueger
1.Population structure, distribution, abundance, and dispersal arguably underpin the entire field of animal ecology, with consequences for regional species persistence, and provision of ecosystem services. Divergent migration behaviours among individuals or among populations is an important aspect of the ecology of highly-mobile animals, allowing populations to exploit spatially- or temporally-distributed food and space resources. 2.This study investigated the spatial ecology of lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) within the barrier free Huron-Erie Corridor (HEC), which connects Lake Huron and Lake Erie of the North American Laurentian Great Lakes...
October 21, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29055050/an-evolutionary-framework-outlining-the-integration-of-individual-social-and-spatial-ecology
#16
REVIEW
Quinn M R Webber, Eric Vander Wal
1.Behaviour is the interface between an organism and its environment, and behavioural plasticity is important for organisms to cope with environmental change. Social behaviour is particularly important because sociality is a dynamic process, where environmental variation influences group dynamics and social plasticity can mediate resource acquisition. Heterogeneity in the ecological environment can therefore influence the social environment. The combination of the ecological and social environments may be interpreted collectively as the 'socioecological' environment', which could explain variation in fitness...
October 21, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29048758/phenological-synchrony-between-a-butterfly-and-its-host-plants-experimental-test-of-effects-of-spring-temperature
#17
D Posledovich, T Toftegaard, C Wiklund, J Ehrlén, K Gotthard
1.Climate-driven changes in the relative phenologies of interacting species may potentially alter the outcome of species interactions. 2.Phenotypic plasticity is expected to be important for short-term response to new climate conditions, and differences between species in plasticity are likely to influence their temporal overlap and interaction patterns. As reaction norms of interacting species may be locally adapted, any such climate-induced change in interaction patterns may vary among localities. However, consequences of spatial variation in plastic responses for species interactions are understudied...
October 19, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29048750/isotopic-niche-variation-from-the-holocene-to-today-reveals-minimal-partitioning-and-individualistic-dynamics-among-four-sympatric-desert-mice
#18
Rebecca C Terry
1.Species interact with each other and their environment over a range of temporal scales, yet our understanding of resource partitioning and the mechanisms of species coexistence is largely restricted to modern time-scales of years to decades. Furthermore, the relative magnitudes of inter- versus intraspecific variation in resource use are rarely considered, despite the potential for the latter to influence a species' ability to cope with changing environmental conditions. 2.Modern desert rodent communities are thought to be strongly structured by competitive interactions, with niche partitioning of food resources hypothesized to explain the coexistence of multiple sympatric granivores...
October 19, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29235116/transparency-and-open-processes-in-journal-of-animal-ecology
#19
EDITORIAL
Kenneth Wilson, Ben C Sheldon, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Nathan J Sanders, Simon P G Hoggart, Erika Newton
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2018: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29235115/the-mechanistic-basis-of-demographic-allee-effects-the-search-for-mates
#20
Anna Kuparinen
In Focus: Berec, L., Kremer, A.M., Bernhauverova, V., & Drake, J.M. (2017). Density-dependent selection on mate-finding Allee effects. Journal of Animal Ecology, 87, 24-35. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.12662 In Focus: Shaw, A.K., Kokko, H., & Neubert, M.G. (2017). Details of mate finding drive dynamics of sex structured invasions. Journal of Animal Ecology, 87, 36-46. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.12658 Lowered population growth ability at low abundances is called the demographic Allee effect. The difficulty of finding mates in a sparse population is the best documented pathway through which a demographic Allee effect might arise...
January 2018: Journal of Animal Ecology
journal
journal
23968
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"