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Psychological Review

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28933872/from-needs-to-goals-and-representations-foundations-for-a-unified-theory-of-motivation-personality-and-development
#1
Carol S Dweck
Drawing on both classic and current approaches, I propose a theory that integrates motivation, personality, and development within one framework, using a common set of principles and mechanisms. The theory begins by specifying basic needs and by suggesting how, as people pursue need-fulfilling goals, they build mental representations of their experiences (beliefs, representations of emotions, and representations of action tendencies). I then show how these needs, goals, and representations can serve as the basis of both motivation and personality, and can help to integrate disparate views of personality...
September 21, 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28910127/visual-shape-perception-as-bayesian-inference-of-3d-object-centered-shape-representations
#2
Goker Erdogan, Robert A Jacobs
Despite decades of research, little is known about how people visually perceive object shape. We hypothesize that a promising approach to shape perception is provided by a "visual perception as Bayesian inference" framework which augments an emphasis on visual representation with an emphasis on the idea that shape perception is a form of statistical inference. Our hypothesis claims that shape perception of unfamiliar objects can be characterized as statistical inference of 3D shape in an object-centered coordinate system...
September 14, 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28703607/none-of-the-above-a-bayesian-account-of-the-detection-of-novel-categories
#3
Daniel J Navarro, Charles Kemp
Every time we encounter a new object, action, or event, there is some chance that we will need to assign it to a novel category. We describe and evaluate a class of probabilistic models that detect when an object belongs to a category that has not previously been encountered. The models incorporate a prior distribution that is influenced by the distribution of previous objects among categories, and we present 2 experiments that demonstrate that people are also sensitive to this distributional information. Two additional experiments confirm that distributional information is combined with similarity when both sources of information are available...
October 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28703606/cyclical-population-dynamics-of-automatic-versus-controlled-processing-an-evolutionary-pendulum
#4
David G Rand, Damon Tomlin, Adam Bear, Elliot A Ludvig, Jonathan D Cohen
Psychologists, neuroscientists, and economists often conceptualize decisions as arising from processes that lie along a continuum from automatic (i.e., "hardwired" or overlearned, but relatively inflexible) to controlled (less efficient and effortful, but more flexible). Control is central to human cognition, and plays a key role in our ability to modify the world to suit our needs. Given its advantages, reliance on controlled processing may seem predestined to increase within the population over time. Here, we examine whether this is so by introducing an evolutionary game theoretic model of agents that vary in their use of automatic versus controlled processes, and in which cognitive processing modifies the environment in which the agents interact...
October 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28569526/noisy-preferences-in-risky-choice-a-cautionary-note
#5
Sudeep Bhatia, Graham Loomes
We examine the effects of multiple sources of noise in risky decision making. Noise in the parameters that characterize an individual's preferences can combine with noise in the response process to distort observed choice proportions. Thus, underlying preferences that conform to expected value maximization can appear to show systematic risk aversion or risk seeking. Similarly, core preferences that are consistent with expected utility theory, when perturbed by such noise, can appear to display nonlinear probability weighting...
October 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28504522/the-construct-behavior-gap-in-behavioral-decision-research-a-challenge-beyond-replicability
#6
Michel Regenwetter, Maria M Robinson
Behavioral decision research compares theoretical constructs like preferences to behavior such as observed choices. Three fairly common links from constructs to behavior are (1) to tally, across participants and decision problems, the number of choices consistent with one predicted pattern of pairwise preferences; (2) to compare what most people choose in each decision problem against a predicted preference pattern; or (3) to enumerate the decision problems in which two experimental conditions generate a 1-sided significant difference in choice frequency 'consistent' with the theory...
October 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28471206/the-complementary-roles-of-auditory-and-motor-information-evaluated-in-a-bayesian-perceptuo-motor-model-of-speech-perception
#7
Raphaël Laurent, Marie-Lou Barnaud, Jean-Luc Schwartz, Pierre Bessière, Julien Diard
There is a consensus concerning the view that both auditory and motor representations intervene in the perceptual processing of speech units. However, the question of the functional role of each of these systems remains seldom addressed and poorly understood. We capitalized on the formal framework of Bayesian Programming to develop COSMO (Communicating Objects using Sensory-Motor Operations), an integrative model that allows principled comparisons of purely motor or purely auditory implementations of a speech perception task and tests the gain of efficiency provided by their Bayesian fusion...
October 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28447812/a-computational-model-of-fraction-arithmetic
#8
David W Braithwaite, Aryn A Pyke, Robert S Siegler
Many children fail to master fraction arithmetic even after years of instruction, a failure that hinders their learning of more advanced mathematics as well as their occupational success. To test hypotheses about why children have so many difficulties in this area, we created a computational model of fraction arithmetic learning and presented it with the problems from a widely used textbook series. The simulation generated many phenomena of children's fraction arithmetic performance through a small number of common learning mechanisms operating on a biased input set...
October 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28414490/interference-and-memory-capacity-limitations
#9
Ansgar D Endress, Szilárd Szabó
Working memory (WM) is thought to have a fixed and limited capacity. However, the origins of these capacity limitations are debated, and generally attributed to active, attentional processes. Here, we show that the existence of interference among items in memory mathematically guarantees fixed and limited capacity limits under very general conditions, irrespective of any processing assumptions. Assuming that interference (a) increases with the number of interfering items and (b) brings memory performance to chance levels for large numbers of interfering items, capacity limits are a simple function of the relative influence of memorization and interference...
October 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28639818/a-critical-examination-of-the-research-and-theoretical-underpinnings-discussed-in-thomson-besner-and-smilek-2016
#10
Nicholas W Fraulini, Gabriella M Hancock, Alexis R Neigel, Victoria L Claypoole, James L Szalma
Thomson, Besner, and Smilek (2016) propose that performance decrements associated with sustained attention are not consistently the result of a decline in perceptual sensitivity. Thomson et al. (2016) present empirical evidence using a novel, nontraditional vigilance task to support their assumptions. However, in the present rebuttal, we argue that the authors have not only have misinterpreted previous research in sustained attention, but also have misapplied those interpretations to their study. Thomson et al...
July 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28447811/likelihood-based-parameter-estimation-and-comparison-of-dynamical-cognitive-models
#11
Heiko H Schütt, Lars O M Rothkegel, Hans A Trukenbrod, Sebastian Reich, Felix A Wichmann, Ralf Engbert
Dynamical models of cognition play an increasingly important role in driving theoretical and experimental research in psychology. Therefore, parameter estimation, model analysis and comparison of dynamical models are of essential importance. In this article, we propose a maximum likelihood approach for model analysis in a fully dynamical framework that includes time-ordered experimental data. Our methods can be applied to dynamical models for the prediction of discrete behavior (e.g., movement onsets); in particular, we use a dynamical model of saccade generation in scene viewing as a case study for our approach...
July 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383925/a-neural-interpretation-of-exemplar-theory
#12
F Gregory Ashby, Luke Rosedahl
Exemplar theory assumes that people categorize a novel object by comparing its similarity to the memory representations of all previous exemplars from each relevant category. Exemplar theory has been the most prominent cognitive theory of categorization for more than 30 years. Despite its considerable success in providing good quantitative fits to a wide variety of accuracy data, it has never had a detailed neurobiological interpretation. This article proposes a neural interpretation of exemplar theory in which category learning is mediated by synaptic plasticity at cortical-striatal synapses...
July 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28437128/neural-dynamics-of-grouping-and-segmentation-explain-properties-of-visual-crowding
#13
Gregory Francis, Mauro Manassi, Michael H Herzog
Investigations of visual crowding, where a target is difficult to identify because of flanking elements, has largely used a theoretical perspective based on local interactions where flanking elements pool with or substitute for properties of the target. This successful theoretical approach has motivated a wide variety of empirical investigations to identify mechanisms that cause crowding, and it has suggested practical applications to mitigate crowding effects. However, this theoretical approach has been unable to account for a parallel set of findings that crowding is influenced by long-range perceptual grouping effects...
April 24, 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28368144/linking-process-and-measurement-models-of-recognition-based-decisions
#14
Daniel W Heck, Edgar Erdfelder
When making inferences about pairs of objects, one of which is recognized and the other is not, the recognition heuristic states that participants choose the recognized object in a noncompensatory way without considering any further knowledge. In contrast, information-integration theories such as parallel constraint satisfaction (PCS) assume that recognition is merely one of many cues that is integrated with further knowledge in a compensatory way. To test both process models against each other without manipulating recognition or further knowledge, we include response times into the r-model, a popular multinomial processing tree model for memory-based decisions...
April 3, 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28358566/use-of-tools-and-misuse-of-embodied-cognition-reply-to-buxbaum-2017
#15
François Osiurak, Arnaud Badets
Osiurak and Badets (2016) examined the validity of the manipulation-based versus the reasoning-based approaches to tool use in light of studies in experimental psychology and neuropsychology. They concluded that the reasoning-based approach seems to be more promising than the manipulation-based approach for understanding the current literature. Buxbaum (2017) questioned this conclusion and raised certain theoretical limitations with regard to the reasoning-based approach. She also suggested that this approach is not well-equipped to integrate the existing psychological and neuroanatomical data in the tool use domain...
April 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28358565/learning-remembering-and-predicting-how-to-use-tools-distributed-neurocognitive-mechanisms-comment-on-osiurak-and-badets-2016
#16
COMMENT
Laurel J Buxbaum
The reasoning-based approach championed by Francois Osiurak and Arnaud Badets (Osiurak & Badets, 2016) denies the existence of sensory-motor memories of tool use except in limited circumstances, and suggests instead that most tool use is subserved solely by online technical reasoning about tool properties. In this commentary, I highlight the strengths and limitations of the reasoning-based approach and review a number of lines of evidence that manipulation knowledge is in fact used in tool action tasks. In addition, I present a "two route" neurocognitive model of tool use called the "Two Action Systems Plus (2AS+)" framework that posits a complementary role for online and stored information and specifies the neurocognitive substrates of task-relevant action selection...
April 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28358564/latest-a-model-of-saccadic-decisions-in-space-and-time
#17
Benjamin W Tatler, James R Brockmole, R H S Carpenter
Many of our actions require visual information, and for this it is important to direct the eyes to the right place at the right time. Two or three times every second, we must decide both when and where to direct our gaze. Understanding these decisions can reveal the moment-to-moment information priorities of the visual system and the strategies for information sampling employed by the brain to serve ongoing behavior. Most theoretical frameworks and models of gaze control assume that the spatial and temporal aspects of fixation point selection depend on different mechanisms...
April 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28240923/how-do-gestures-influence-thinking-and-speaking-the-gesture-for-conceptualization-hypothesis
#18
Sotaro Kita, Martha W Alibali, Mingyuan Chu
People spontaneously produce gestures during speaking and thinking. The authors focus here on gestures that depict or indicate information related to the contents of concurrent speech or thought (i.e., representational gestures). Previous research indicates that such gestures have not only communicative functions, but also self-oriented cognitive functions. In this article, the authors propose a new theoretical framework, the gesture-for-conceptualization hypothesis, which explains the self-oriented functions of representational gestures...
April 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28240922/formalizing-neurath-s-ship-approximate-algorithms-for-online-causal-learning
#19
Neil R Bramley, Peter Dayan, Thomas L Griffiths, David A Lagnado
Higher-level cognition depends on the ability to learn models of the world. We can characterize this at the computational level as a structure-learning problem with the goal of best identifying the prevailing causal relationships among a set of relata. However, the computational cost of performing exact Bayesian inference over causal models grows rapidly as the number of relata increases. This implies that the cognitive processes underlying causal learning must be substantially approximate. A powerful class of approximations that focuses on the sequential absorption of successive inputs is captured by the Neurath's ship metaphor in philosophy of science, where theory change is cast as a stochastic and gradual process shaped as much by people's limited willingness to abandon their current theory when considering alternatives as by the ground truth they hope to approach...
April 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28150957/model-flexibility-analysis-does-not-measure-the-persuasiveness-of-a-fit
#20
Nathan J Evans, Zachary L Howard, Andrew Heathcote, Scott D Brown
Recently, Veksler, Myers, and Gluck (2015) proposed model flexibility analysis as a method that "aids model evaluation by providing a metric for gauging the persuasiveness of a given fit" (p. 755) Model flexibility analysis measures the complexity of a model in terms of the proportion of all possible data patterns it can predict. We show that this measure does not provide a reliable way to gauge complexity, which prevents model flexibility analysis from fulfilling either of the 2 aims outlined by Veksler et al...
April 2017: Psychological Review
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