journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Psychological Bulletin

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406659/does-gratitude-enhance-prosociality-a-meta-analytic-review
#1
Lawrence K Ma, Richard J Tunney, Eamonn Ferguson
Theoretical models suggest that gratitude is linked to increased prosociality. To date, however, there is a lack of a comprehensive quantitative synthesis of results to support this claim. In this review we aimed to (a) examine the overall strength of the association between gratitude and prosociality, and (b) identify the theoretical and methodological variables that moderate this link. We identified 252 effect sizes from 91 studies across 65 papers-(Total N = 18,342 participants). The present meta-analysis revealed a statistically significant, and moderate positive correlation between gratitude and prosociality (r = ...
April 13, 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28368148/the-effects-of-acute-stress-on-episodic-memory-a-meta-analysis-and-integrative-review
#2
Grant S Shields, Matthew A Sazma, Andrew M McCullough, Andrew P Yonelinas
A growing body of research has indicated that acute stress can critically impact memory. However, there are a number of inconsistencies in the literature, and important questions remain regarding the conditions under which stress effects emerge as well as basic questions about how stress impacts different phases of memory. In this meta-analysis, we examined 113 independent studies in humans with 6,216 participants that explored effects of stress on encoding, postencoding, retrieval, or postreactivation phases of episodic memory...
April 3, 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28368147/the-three-second-subjective-present-a-critical-review-and-a-new-proposal
#3
Peter A White
It has been argued that there is a "subjective present" or "experienced moment" of about 3 seconds in duration, involving automatic binding of events into perceptual units on that time scale. Research on topics that have been taken as relevant to this proposal is reviewed. The topics include accuracy in reproduction of stimulus durations, synchronization of behavior with a regular beat, mental rhythmization of a regular beat, time units in behavior, segmentation of observed behavior into meaningful units, time scale of reversals of perception with bistable ambiguous figures, time scale of inhibition of return in visual search, and EEG responses to deviant stimuli in series of repeating stimuli...
April 3, 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333495/variables-associated-with-achievement-in-higher-education-a-systematic-review-of-meta-analyses
#4
Michael Schneider, Franzis Preckel
The last 2 decades witnessed a surge in empirical studies on the variables associated with achievement in higher education. A number of meta-analyses synthesized these findings. In our systematic literature review, we included 38 meta-analyses investigating 105 correlates of achievement, based on 3,330 effect sizes from almost 2 million students. We provide a list of the 105 variables, ordered by the effect size, and summary statistics for central research topics. The results highlight the close relation between social interaction in courses and achievement...
March 23, 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333494/taxonomic-and-thematic-semantic-systems
#5
Daniel Mirman, Jon-Frederick Landrigan, Allison E Britt
Object concepts are critical for nearly all aspects of human cognition, from perception tasks like object recognition, to understanding and producing language, to making meaningful actions. Concepts can have 2 very different kinds of relations: similarity relations based on shared features (e.g., dog-bear), which are called "taxonomic" relations, and contiguity relations based on co-occurrence in events or scenarios (e.g., dog-leash), which are called "thematic" relations. Here, we report a systematic review of experimental psychology and cognitive neuroscience evidence of this distinction in the structure of semantic memory...
May 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333493/bayesian-approaches-to-autism-towards-volatility-action-and-behavior
#6
Colin J Palmer, Rebecca P Lawson, Jakob Hohwy
Autism spectrum disorder currently lacks an explanation that bridges cognitive, computational, and neural domains. In the past 5 years, progress has been sought in this area by drawing on Bayesian probability theory to describe both social and nonsocial aspects of autism in terms of systematic differences in the processing of sensory information in the brain. The present article begins by synthesizing the existing literature in this regard, including an introduction to the topic for unfamiliar readers. The key proposal is that autism is characterized by a greater weighting of sensory information in updating probabilistic representations of the environment...
May 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28263645/a-re-examination-of-the-mere-exposure-effect-the-influence-of-repeated-exposure-on-recognition-familiarity-and-liking
#7
R Matthew Montoya, Robert S Horton, Jack L Vevea, Martyna Citkowicz, Elissa A Lauber
To evaluate the veracity of models of the mere exposure effect and to understand the processes that moderate the effect, we conducted a meta-analysis of the influence of repeated exposure on liking, familiarity, recognition, among other evaluations. We estimated parameters from 268 curve estimates drawn from 81 articles and revealed that the mere exposure effect was characterized by a positive slope and negative quadratic effect consistent with an inverted-U shaped curve. In fact, such curves were associated with (a) all visual, but not auditory stimuli; (b) exposure durations shorter than 10 s and longer than 1 min; (c) both homogeneous and heterogeneous presentation types; and (d) ratings that were taken after all stimuli were presented...
May 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28263644/who-s-biased-a-meta-analysis-of-buyer-seller-differences-in-the-pricing-of-lotteries
#8
Eldad Yechiam, Nathaniel J S Ashby, Thorsten Pachur
A large body of empirical research has examined the impact of trading perspective on pricing of consumer products, with the typical finding being that selling prices exceed buying prices (i.e., the endowment effect). Using a meta-analytic approach, we examine to what extent the endowment effect also emerges in the pricing of monetary lotteries. As monetary lotteries have a clearly defined normative value, we also assess whether one trading perspective is more biased than the other. We consider several indicators of bias: absolute deviation from expected values, rank correlation with expected values, overall variance, and per-unit variance...
May 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28301203/time-for-considering-the-possibility-that-sleep-plays-no-unique-role-in-motor-memory-consolidation-reply-to-adi-japha-and-karni-2016
#9
Timothy C Rickard, Steven C Pan
The hypothesis that sleep makes a unique contribution to motor memory consolidation has been debated in recent years. In the target article (Pan & Rickard, 2015), we reported results of a comprehensive meta-analysis of the explicit motor sequence learning literature in which evidence was evaluated for both enhanced performance after sleep and stabilization after sleep. After accounting for confounding variables, we found no compelling evidence for either empirical phenomenon, and hence no compelling evidence for sleep-specific consolidation...
April 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28301202/the-structure-of-common-emotion-regulation-strategies-a-meta-analytic-examination
#10
Kristin Naragon-Gainey, Tierney P McMahon, Thomas P Chacko
Emotion regulation has been examined extensively with regard to important outcomes, including psychological and physical health. However, the literature includes many different emotion regulation strategies but little examination of how they relate to one another, making it difficult to interpret and synthesize findings. The goal of this meta-analysis was to examine the underlying structure of common emotion regulation strategies (i.e., acceptance, behavioral avoidance, distraction, experiential avoidance, expressive suppression, mindfulness, problem solving, reappraisal, rumination, worry), and to evaluate this structure in light of theoretical models of emotion regulation...
April 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28191983/mental-health-of-extremely-low-birth-weight-survivors-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#11
Karen J Mathewson, Cheryl H T Chow, Kathleen G Dobson, Eliza I Pope, Louis A Schmidt, Ryan J Van Lieshout
Although individuals born at extremely low birth weight (ELBW; < 1,000 g) are the most vulnerable of all preterm survivors, their risk for mental health problems across the life span has not been systematically reviewed. The primary objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to ascertain whether the risk for mental health problems is greater for ELBW survivors than their normal birth weight (NBW) peers in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Forty-one studies assessing 2,712 ELBW children, adolescents, and adults and 11,127 NBW controls were reviewed...
April 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182460/lying-takes-time-a-meta-analysis-on-reaction-time-measures-of-deception
#12
Kristina Suchotzki, Bruno Verschuere, Bram Van Bockstaele, Gershon Ben-Shakhar, Geert Crombez
Lie detection techniques are frequently used, but most of them have been criticized for the lack of empirical support for their predictive validity and presumed underlying mechanisms. This situation has led to increased efforts to unravel the cognitive mechanisms underlying deception and to develop a comprehensive theory of deception. A cognitive approach to deception has reinvigorated interest in reaction time (RT) measures to differentiate lies from truths and to investigate whether lying is more cognitively demanding than truth telling...
April 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28230414/the-effect-of-cognitive-behavioral-therapy-as-an-antidepressive-treatment-is-falling-reply-to-lj%C3%A3-tsson-et-al-2017-and-cristea-et-al-2017
#13
Oddgeir Friborg, Tom J Johnsen
This article critically reassesses the nonlinear reanalysis by Ljótsson, Hedman, Mattsson, and Andersson (2017) and reviews Cristea et al.'s (2017) extension of our original meta-analysis (Johnsen & Friborg, 2015) reporting a decline in the effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating unipolar depression. Ljótsson et al. fitted a piecewise meta-regression model to the data, indicating a halt in the decline from the year 1995 onward, hence concluding that CBT is not gradually losing its efficacy...
March 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28230413/the-effects-of-cognitive-behavioral-therapy-are-not-systematically-falling-a-revision-of-johnsen-and-friborg-2015
#14
Ioana A Cristea, Simona Stefan, Eirini Karyotaki, Daniel David, Steven D Hollon, Pim Cuijpers
In a meta-analysis, Johnsen and Friborg (2015) reported a significant negative relationship between publication year and the effect sizes (ESs) of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depressive disorders, suggesting its effectiveness was falling. We identified a series of methodological and conceptual caveats and consequently redid the meta-analysis. We used the same inclusion criteria, but only included randomized controlled trials and searched for additional eligible trials. We computed both within-group and between-group ESs for the CBT arm for the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD)...
March 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28230412/the-effects-of-cognitive-behavioral-therapy-for-depression-are-not-falling-a-re-analysis-of-johnsen-and-friborg-2015
#15
Brjánn Ljótsson, Erik Hedman, Simon Mattsson, Erik Andersson
Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has a solid evidence base as an effective treatment for depression. However, a recent meta-analysis (Johnsen & Friborg, 2015) including 70 studies, showed that the effect sizes of CBT for depression have been falling between 1977 and 2014. A possible important limitation in the Johnsen and Friborg (2015) study was that they did not investigate a leveling off in the decline over time of the effectiveness of CBT for depression. We therefore reanalyzed the data reported by Johnsen and Friborg (2015) using meta-analytic regression models that allowed for a curvilinear effect of publication year and also modeled separate estimates of the decline of treatment effect before and after 1995...
March 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28230411/the-bilingual-adaptation-how-minds-accommodate-experience
#16
Ellen Bialystok
According to some estimates, more than half of the world's population is multilingual to some extent. Because of the centrality of language use to human experience and the deep connections between linguistic and nonlinguistic processing, it would not be surprising to find that there are interactions between bilingualism and cognitive and brain processes. The present review uses the framework of experience-dependent plasticity to evaluate the evidence for systematic modifications of brain and cognitive systems that can be attributed to bilingualism...
March 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28054797/a-systematic-review-of-personality-trait-change-through-intervention
#17
Brent W Roberts, Jing Luo, Daniel A Briley, Philip I Chow, Rong Su, Patrick L Hill
The current meta-analysis investigated the extent to which personality traits changed as a result of intervention, with the primary focus on clinical interventions. We identified 207 studies that had tracked changes in measures of personality traits during interventions, including true experiments and prepost change designs. Interventions were associated with marked changes in personality trait measures over an average time of 24 weeks (e.g., d = .37). Additional analyses showed that the increases replicated across experimental and nonexperimental designs, for nonclinical interventions, and persisted in longitudinal follow-ups of samples beyond the course of intervention...
February 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28004947/a-hierarchical-causal-taxonomy-of-psychopathology-across-the-life-span
#18
Benjamin B Lahey, Robert F Krueger, Paul J Rathouz, Irwin D Waldman, David H Zald
We propose a taxonomy of psychopathology based on patterns of shared causal influences identified in a review of multivariate behavior genetic studies that distinguish genetic and environmental influences that are either common to multiple dimensions of psychopathology or unique to each dimension. At the phenotypic level, first-order dimensions are defined by correlations among symptoms; correlations among first-order dimensions similarly define higher-order domains (e.g., internalizing or externalizing psychopathology)...
February 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27841450/risk-factors-for-suicidal-thoughts-and-behaviors-a-meta-analysis-of-50-years-of-research
#19
Joseph C Franklin, Jessica D Ribeiro, Kathryn R Fox, Kate H Bentley, Evan M Kleiman, Xieyining Huang, Katherine M Musacchio, Adam C Jaroszewski, Bernard P Chang, Matthew K Nock
Suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs) are major public health problems that have not declined appreciably in several decades. One of the first steps to improving the prevention and treatment of STBs is to establish risk factors (i.e., longitudinal predictors). To provide a summary of current knowledge about risk factors, we conducted a meta-analysis of studies that have attempted to longitudinally predict a specific STB-related outcome. This included 365 studies (3,428 total risk factor effect sizes) from the past 50 years...
February 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095000/the-challenge-of-abstract-concepts
#20
Anna M Borghi, Ferdinand Binkofski, Cristiano Castelfranchi, Felice Cimatti, Claudia Scorolli, Luca Tummolini
concepts ("freedom") differ from concrete ones ("cat"), as they do not have a bounded, identifiable, and clearly perceivable referent. The way in which abstract concepts are represented has recently become a topic of intense debate, especially because of the spread of the embodied approach to cognition. Within this framework concepts derive their meaning from the same perception, motor, and emotional systems that are involved in online interaction with the world. Most of the evidence in favor of this view, however, has been gathered with regard to concrete concepts...
January 16, 2017: Psychological Bulletin
journal
journal
23928
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"