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Psychological Bulletin

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28191983/mental-health-of-extremely-low-birth-weight-survivors-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#1
Karen J Mathewson, Cheryl H T Chow, Kathleen G Dobson, Eliza I Pope, Louis A Schmidt, Ryan J Van Lieshout
Although individuals born at extremely low birth weight (ELBW; < 1,000 g) are the most vulnerable of all preterm survivors, their risk for mental health problems across the life span has not been systematically reviewed. The primary objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to ascertain whether the risk for mental health problems is greater for ELBW survivors than their normal birth weight (NBW) peers in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Forty-one studies assessing 2,712 ELBW children, adolescents, and adults and 11,127 NBW controls were reviewed...
February 13, 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182460/lying-takes-time-a-meta-analysis-on-reaction-time-measures-of-deception
#2
Kristina Suchotzki, Bruno Verschuere, Bram Van Bockstaele, Gershon Ben-Shakhar, Geert Crombez
Lie detection techniques are frequently used, but most of them have been criticized for the lack of empirical support for their predictive validity and presumed underlying mechanisms. This situation has led to increased efforts to unravel the cognitive mechanisms underlying deception and to develop a comprehensive theory of deception. A cognitive approach to deception has reinvigorated interest in reaction time (RT) measures to differentiate lies from truths and to investigate whether lying is more cognitively demanding than truth telling...
February 9, 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095000/the-challenge-of-abstract-concepts
#3
Anna M Borghi, Ferdinand Binkofski, Cristiano Castelfranchi, Felice Cimatti, Claudia Scorolli, Luca Tummolini
concepts ("freedom") differ from concrete ones ("cat"), as they do not have a bounded, identifiable, and clearly perceivable referent. The way in which abstract concepts are represented has recently become a topic of intense debate, especially because of the spread of the embodied approach to cognition. Within this framework concepts derive their meaning from the same perception, motor, and emotional systems that are involved in online interaction with the world. Most of the evidence in favor of this view, however, has been gathered with regard to concrete concepts...
January 16, 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27893220/is-body-dissatisfaction-changing-across-time-a-cross-temporal-meta-analysis
#4
Bryan T Karazsia, Sarah K Murnen, Tracy L Tylka
It remains unclear whether body dissatisfaction, a widely recognized predictor of eating-related pathologies and depressive symptomatology, is consistent across cohorts and time. This question is important to investigate because dominant theories propose that sociocultural influences, which may fluctuate, play an important role in the development of body dissatisfaction. Previous efforts for tracking body dissatisfaction across cohorts and time are limited by relying on data from a single institution or using assessments that lack psychometric support across genders...
November 28, 2016: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28054797/a-systematic-review-of-personality-trait-change-through-intervention
#5
Brent W Roberts, Jing Luo, Daniel A Briley, Philip I Chow, Rong Su, Patrick L Hill
The current meta-analysis investigated the extent to which personality traits changed as a result of intervention, with the primary focus on clinical interventions. We identified 207 studies that had tracked changes in measures of personality traits during interventions, including true experiments and prepost change designs. Interventions were associated with marked changes in personality trait measures over an average time of 24 weeks (e.g., d = .37). Additional analyses showed that the increases replicated across experimental and nonexperimental designs, for nonclinical interventions, and persisted in longitudinal follow-ups of samples beyond the course of intervention...
February 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28004947/a-hierarchical-causal-taxonomy-of-psychopathology-across-the-life-span
#6
Benjamin B Lahey, Robert F Krueger, Paul J Rathouz, Irwin D Waldman, David H Zald
We propose a taxonomy of psychopathology based on patterns of shared causal influences identified in a review of multivariate behavior genetic studies that distinguish genetic and environmental influences that are either common to multiple dimensions of psychopathology or unique to each dimension. At the phenotypic level, first-order dimensions are defined by correlations among symptoms; correlations among first-order dimensions similarly define higher-order domains (e.g., internalizing or externalizing psychopathology)...
February 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27841450/risk-factors-for-suicidal-thoughts-and-behaviors-a-meta-analysis-of-50-years-of-research
#7
Joseph C Franklin, Jessica D Ribeiro, Kathryn R Fox, Kate H Bentley, Evan M Kleiman, Xieyining Huang, Katherine M Musacchio, Adam C Jaroszewski, Bernard P Chang, Matthew K Nock
Suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs) are major public health problems that have not declined appreciably in several decades. One of the first steps to improving the prevention and treatment of STBs is to establish risk factors (i.e., longitudinal predictors). To provide a summary of current knowledge about risk factors, we conducted a meta-analysis of studies that have attempted to longitudinally predict a specific STB-related outcome. This included 365 studies (3,428 total risk factor effect sizes) from the past 50 years...
February 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28004962/failing-the-duck-test-reply-to-barbaro-boutwell-barnes-and-shackelford-2017
#8
Marije L Verhage, Carlo Schuengel, R M Pasco Fearon, Sheri Madigan, Mirjam Oosterman, Rosalinda Cassibba, Marian J Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marinus H van IJzendoorn
In this reply, we respond to the critique by Barbaro, Boutwell, Barnes, and Shackelford (2017) in regard to our recent meta-analysis of intergenerational transmission of attachment (Verhage et al., 2016). Barbaro et al. (2017) claim that the influence of shared environment on attachment decreases with age, whereas unique environmental and genetic influences increase, which they felt was disregarded in our meta-analysis. Their criticisms, we argue, are based on a misunderstanding of the core tenets of attachment theory...
January 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28004961/rethinking-the-transmission-gap-what-behavioral-genetics-and-evolutionary-psychology-mean-for-attachment-theory-a-comment-on-verhage-et-al-2016
#9
Nicole Barbaro, Brian B Boutwell, J C Barnes, Todd K Shackelford
Traditional attachment theory posits that attachment in infancy and early childhood is the result of intergenerational transmission of attachment from parents to offspring. Verhage et al. (2016) present meta-analytic evidence addressing the intergenerational transmission of attachment between caregivers and young children. In this commentary, we argue that their appraisal of the behavioral genetics literature is incomplete. The suggested research focus on shared environmental effects may dissuade the pursuit of profitable avenues of research and may hinder progress in attachment theory...
January 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27893219/integrating-the-context-appropriate-balanced-attention-model-and-reinforcement-sensitivity-theory-towards-a-domain-general-personality-process-model
#10
Michael D Collins, Chris J Jackson, Benjamin R Walker, Peter J O'Connor, Elliroma Gardiner
Over the last 40 years or more the personality literature has been dominated by trait models based on the Big Five (B5). Trait-based models describe personality at the between-person level but cannot explain the within-person mental mechanisms responsible for personality. Nor can they adequately account for variations in emotion and behavior experienced by individuals across different situations and over time. An alternative, yet understated, approach to personality architecture can be found in neurobiological theories of personality, most notably reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST)...
January 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27841449/overlap-between-the-general-factor-of-personality-and-emotional-intelligence-a-meta-analysis
#11
Dimitri van der Linden, Keri A Pekaar, Arnold B Bakker, Julie Aitken Schermer, Philip A Vernon, Curtis S Dunkel, K V Petrides
We examine the relationship between the general factor of personality (GFP) and emotional intelligence (EI) and specifically test the hypothesis that the GFP is a social effectiveness factor overlapping conceptually with EI. Presented is an extensive meta-analysis in which the associations between the GFP, extracted from the Big Five dimensions, with various EI measures is examined. Based on a total sample of k = 142 data sources (N = 36,268) the 2 major findings from the meta-analysis were (a) a large overlap between the GFP and trait EI (r ≈ ...
January 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27732018/why-are-some-stem-fields-more-gender-balanced-than-others
#12
Sapna Cheryan, Sianna A Ziegler, Amanda K Montoya, Lily Jiang
Women obtain more than half of U.S. undergraduate degrees in biology, chemistry, and mathematics, yet they earn less than 20% of computer science, engineering, and physics undergraduate degrees (National Science Foundation, 2014a). Gender differences in interest in computer science, engineering, and physics appear even before college. Why are women represented in some science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields more than others? We conduct a critical review of the most commonly cited factors explaining gender disparities in STEM participation and investigate whether these factors explain differential gender participation across STEM fields...
January 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27618545/psychological-correlates-of-habitual-diet-in-healthy-adults
#13
Richard J Stevenson
There are 3 motivations for studying the psychological correlates of habitual diet. First, diet is a major but modifiable cause of morbidity and mortality, and dietary interventions could be improved by knowing the psychological characteristics of consumers of healthy/unhealthy diets. Second, animal studies indicate that diet can impair cognition, stress responsiveness, and affective processing, but it is unclear whether this also happens in humans. Third, certain psychological traits are associated with obesity, but it is not known whether these precede and thus contribute to weight gain...
January 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27869459/the-perils-of-unitary-models-of-the-etiology-of-mental-disorders-the-response-modulation-hypothesis-of-psychopathy-as-a-case-example-rejoinder-to-newman-and-baskin-sommers-2016
#14
Scott O Lilienfeld, Sarah Francis Smith, Ashley L Watts
We respond to Newman and Baskin-Sommers's (2016) criticisms of our meta-analytic and narrative synthesis of the response modulation hypothesis (RMH) of psychopathy (Smith & Lilienfeld, 2015). We concur with Newman and Baskin-Sommers that our results offer modest support for the RMH and that several of our arguments apply with equal force to rival etiological models of psychopathy. Nevertheless, we contend that Newman and Baskin-Sommers' criticisms of our findings and conclusions are unconvincing, and that the research support for the RMH is considerably more mixed than implied by Newman and Baskin-Sommers...
December 2016: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27869458/smith-and-lilienfeld-s-meta-analysis-of-the-response-modulation-hypothesis-important-theoretical-and-quantitative-clarifications
#15
Joseph P Newman, Arielle R Baskin-Sommers
In the first meta-analytic review of the response modulation hypothesis (RMH), an attention-based model for understanding the etiology of psychopathy, Smith and Lilienfeld (2015) report that the average effect size for response modulation deficits in psychopathic individuals fell in the small to medium range (r = .20; p < .001, d = .41). Moreover, support for the RMH extended to both psychopathy dimensions, applied across diverse assessments and settings, and spanned child, adult, female, and male samples...
December 2016: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27748610/emotion-and-false-memory-the-context-content-paradox
#16
S H Bookbinder, C J Brainerd
False memories are influenced by a variety of factors, but emotion is a variable of special significance, for theoretical and practical reasons. Interestingly, emotion's effects on false memory depend on whether it is embedded in the content of to-be-remembered events or in our moods, where mood is an aspect of the context in which events are encoded. We sketch the theoretical basis for this content-context dissociation and then review accumulated evidence that content and context effects are indeed different...
December 2016: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27732017/half-a-century-of-research-on-garner-interference-and-the-separability-integrality-distinction
#17
Daniel Algom, Daniel Fitousi
Research in the allied domains of selective attention and perceptual independence has made great advances over the past 5 decades ensuing from the foundational ideas and research conceived by Wendell R. Garner. In particular, Garner's speeded classification paradigm has received considerable attention in psychology. The paradigm is widely used to inform research and theory in various domains of cognitive science. It was Garner who provided the consensual definition of the separable-integral partition of stimulus dimensions, delineating a set of converging operations sustaining the distinction...
December 2016: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27732016/dispositional-negativity-an-integrative-psychological-and-neurobiological-perspective
#18
Alexander J Shackman, Do P M Tromp, Melissa D Stockbridge, Claire M Kaplan, Rachael M Tillman, Andrew S Fox
Dispositional negativity-the propensity to experience and express more frequent, intense, or enduring negative affect-is a fundamental dimension of childhood temperament and adult personality. Elevated levels of dispositional negativity can have profound consequences for health, wealth, and happiness, drawing the attention of clinicians, researchers, and policymakers. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of the psychological and neurobiological processes linking stable individual differences in dispositional negativity to momentary emotional states...
December 2016: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27559748/hemispheric-asymmetry-in-the-hierarchical-perception-of-music-and-speech
#19
Matthew A Rosenthal
The perception of music and speech involves a higher level, cognitive mechanism that allows listeners to form expectations for future music and speech events. This article comprehensively reviews studies on hemispheric differences in the formation of melodic and harmonic expectations in music and selectively reviews studies on hemispheric differences in the formation of syntactic and semantic expectations in speech. On the basis of this review, it is concluded that the higher level mechanism flexibly lateralizes music processing to either hemisphere depending on the expectation generated by a given musical context...
November 2016: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27709981/deontological-coherence-a-framework-for-commonsense-moral-reasoning
#20
Keith J Holyoak, Derek Powell
We review a broad range of work, primarily in cognitive and social psychology, that provides insight into the processes of moral judgment. In particular, we consider research on pragmatic reasoning about regulations and on coherence in decision making, both areas in which psychological theories have been guided by work in legal philosophy. Armed with these essential prerequisites, we sketch a psychological framework for how ordinary people make judgments about moral issues. Based on a literature review, we show how the framework of deontological coherence unifies findings in moral psychology that have often been explained in terms of a grab-bag of heuristics and biases...
October 6, 2016: Psychological Bulletin
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