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Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28958751/insulin-therapy-increases-cardiovascular-risk-time-for-a-sea-of-change-in-type-2-diabetes-treatment
#1
REVIEW
Mary E Herman, James H O'Keefe, David S H Bell, Stanley S Schwartz
Insulin therapy increased cardiovascular (CV) risk and mortality among type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients in several recently reported clinical outcomes trials. To assess whether this association is causative or coincidental, PubMed searches were used to query the effects of insulin therapy for T2D on CV health and longevity from large-scale outcomes trials, meta-analyses, and patient registry studies, as well as basic research on insulin's direct and pleiotropic actions. Although several old studies provided conflicting results, the majority of large observational studies show strong dose-dependent associations for injected insulin with increased CV risk and worsened mortality...
September 25, 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28844588/a-review-of-cardiac-rehabilitation-delivery-around-the-world
#2
REVIEW
Ella Pesah, Marta Supervia, Karam Turk-Adawi, Sherry L Grace
Herein, 28 publications describing cardiac rehabilitation (CR) delivery in 50 of the 113 countries globally suspected to deliver it are reviewed, to characterize the nature of services. Government funding was the main source of CR reimbursement in most countries (73%), with private and patient funding in about ¼ of cases. Myocardial infarction patients and those having revascularization were commonly served. The main professions delivering CR were physicians, nurses, and physiotherapists. Programs offered a median of 20 sessions, although this varied...
August 24, 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28826671/a-blueprint-for-the-post-discharge-clinic-visit-after-an-admission-for-heart-failure
#3
REVIEW
Aaron Soufer, Ralph J Riello, Nihar R Desai, Jeffrey M Testani, Tariq Ahmad
The immense symptom burden and healthcare expenditure associated with heart failure (HF) has resulted in hospital systems, insurance companies, and federal agencies playing close attention to systems of care delivery. In particular, there has been a large extent of focus on decreasing the frequency of HF readmissions through the development of hospital quality measures and the expansion of post discharge services to improve transitions of care from the inpatient to the outpatient setting. The post discharge clinic visit (PDV) serves an important role in this process as it acts as a fulcrum for the multi-disciplinary services available to HF patients, as well as an opportunity to fill any gaps that might have occurred in evidence based care of the patient...
August 18, 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28826670/heart-failure-transitions-of-care-a-pharmacist-led-post-discharge-pilot-experience
#4
REVIEW
Sherry K Milfred-LaForest, Julie A Gee, Adam M Pugacz, Ileana L Piña, Danielle M Hoover, Robert C Wenzell, Aubrey Felton, Eric Guttenberg, Jose Ortiz
OBJECTIVE: To perform a pilot evaluation of a pharmacist-led, multidisciplinary transitional care clinic for heart failure (HF) patients. BACKGROUND: Transitions of care in HF should include: medication reconciliation, multidisciplinary care, early post-discharge follow-up, and prompt intervention on HF signs and symptoms. We hypothesized that combining these elements with optimization of medications would impact outcomes. METHODS: In the SERIOUS HF Medication Reconciliation Transitional Care Clinic (HF MRTCC), patients were seen by a clinical pharmacist trained in HF...
August 18, 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28801124/changing-our-approach-to-stage-d-heart-failure
#5
REVIEW
Miriam Becnel, Hector O Ventura, Selim R Krim
Despite the tremendous progress made in the management of heart failure (HF), many patients reach advanced stages. This paper aims to present a practical approach to the stage D HF patient who is no longer responding to optimal medical therapy. We discuss all available therapies for this patient population. We also offer some important caveats with regard to identification, risk stratification, evaluation and treatment including early patient referral to a center with an advanced HF program. Given the changing landscape of heart transplantation and an impending change in the allocation system, we also intend to engage a discussion on the need for a paradigm shift towards left ventricular assist device therapy in this population...
August 8, 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28782529/from-heart-failure-to-journal-metrics-making-progress-in-cardiovascular-diseases
#6
EDITORIAL
Carl J Lavie
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 3, 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28779953/comprehensive-heart-failure-management
#7
EDITORIAL
Hector O Ventura, Ileana L Piña
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2, 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28865801/approach-to-acute-heart-failure-in-the-emergency-department
#8
REVIEW
Benton R Hunter, Jennifer Martindale, Osama Abdel-Hafez, Peter S Pang
Acute heart failure (AHF) patients rarely present complaining of 'acute heart failure.' Rather, they initially present to the emergency department (ED) with a myriad of chief complaints, symptoms, and physical exam findings. Such heterogeneity prompts an initially broad differential diagnosis; securing the correct diagnosis can be challenging. Although AHF may be the ultimate diagnosis, the precipitant of decompensation must also be sought and addressed. For those AHF patients who present in respiratory or circulatory failure requiring immediate stabilization, treatment begins even while the diagnosis is uncertain...
September 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28847619/pharmacologic-therapy-for-heart-failure-with-reduced-ejection-fraction-closing-the-gap-between-clinical-guidelines-and-practice
#9
REVIEW
J Barr Biglane, Miriam F Becnel, Hector O Ventura, Selim R Krim
Despite the great progress made in the management of heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), its prevalence continues to rise owing to an aging population and an epidemic of hypertension, obesity and coronary artery disease. For decades, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers have been the mainstay of HFrEF therapy. The recent addition of sacubitril/valsartan and ivabradine to the HF armamentarium has the potential to transform our therapeutic approach to HFrEF, while simultaneously raising some questions and uncertainties on their applicability...
September 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28743529/implementation-of-a-patient-navigator-program-to-reduce-30-day-heart-failure-readmission-rate
#10
REVIEW
Katherine E Di Palo, Khusbu Patel, Manaf Assafin, Ileana L Piña
With increasing awareness to provide personalized care our institution applied the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Patient Navigator Program to identify hospitalized heart failure (HF) patients and improve transitions and outcomes. Utilizing a Navigator Team (NT) composed of a nurse and clinical pharmacist, we delivered evidenced-based interventions and hypothesized this approach would improve identification of HF inpatients and reduce the 30-day all-cause readmission rate. Patients were followed from admission to discharge and received at least one intervention, tailored to the patient's health literacy and social needs...
July 22, 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28733079/is-an-admission-for-decompensated-heart-failure-inevitable
#11
REVIEW
Alexander J Blood, Ariane M Fraiche, Zubin J Eapen
Given the high prevalence of heart failure (HF) and the profound impact on morbid, mortality, and health care costs, strategies to improve outcomes and reduce cost have become progressively more attractive. Reducing HF hospitalizations as a study outcome has gained traction in recent years. The basic hypothesis of these investigations is that HF hospitalizations are preventable and harmful. This article examines advancements in pharmacotherapy, medical devices, and health care delivery techniques targeting reductions in HF hospitalizations and evaluates the role and implications of hospitalization in the natural history of HF...
July 18, 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28793972/taking-physical-activity-exercise-and-fitness-to-a-higher-level
#12
EDITORIAL
Ulrik Wisloff, Carl J Lavie
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689854/impact-of-cardiac-rehabilitation-and-exercise-training-programs-in-coronary-heart-disease
#13
REVIEW
Sergey Kachur, Vasutakarn Chongthammakun, Carl J Lavie, Alban De Schutter, Ross Arena, Richard V Milani, Barry A Franklin
Cardiovascular rehabilitation (CR) is the process of developing and maintaining an optimal level of physical, social, and psychological well-being in order to promote recovery from cardiovascular (CV) illness. It is a multi-disciplinary approach encompassing supervised exercise training, patient counseling, education and nutritional guidance that may also enhance quality of life. Beneficial CV effects may include improving coronary heart disease risk factors; particularly exercise capacity, reversing cardiac remodeling, and favorably modifying metabolism and systemic oxygen transport...
June 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28684221/exercise-training-for-prevention-and-treatment-of-heart-failure
#14
REVIEW
Nitin Kondamudi, Mark Haykowsky, Daniel E Forman, Jarett D Berry, Ambarish Pandey
Heart failure (HF) results in high healthcare costs and burdens for the United States in respects to hospitalizations, therapies, and associated disability. The relative proportion of HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) compared with HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is on the rise; HFpEF has already become the dominant form of HF and it continues to increase. The serious implications of these trends are compounded by a dearth of effective HFpEF therapies. While low physical activity, low cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and obesity, are risk factors for HF in general, they particularly predispose to HFpEF...
June 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28666746/micrornas-as-important-regulators-of-exercise-adaptation
#15
REVIEW
Gustavo J J Silva, Anja Bye, Hamid El Azzouzi, Ulrik Wisløff
A significant body of evidence supports the protective role of exercise training (ET) in cardiovascular diseases, skeletal muscle dystrophies, several types of cancer, Alzheimer disease or even in the recovery of spinal cord injury. In spite of this, the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise training are not well understood and remain elusive. Several mechanisms have been proposed in the past, but more recently microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNA molecules involved in a variety of basic biological processes that negatively modulate gene expression, recognized as important regulatory molecules...
June 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28606473/cardiorespiratory-fitness-and-exercise-training-in-african-americans
#16
REVIEW
Damon L Swift, Neil M Johannsen, Conrad P Earnest, Robert L Newton, Joshua E McGee, Timothy S Church
African Americans (AAs) have a higher risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared to their Caucasian American (CA) counterparts, which represents a major health disparity. Low cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is a well-established independent risk factor for all-cause and CVD mortality, which has been shown across many epidemiological and clinical trials to be lower in AAs compared to CAs. While much attention has been given to traditional health disparity risk factors (e.g. blood pressure, obesity, insulin resistance), the impact of racial differences in CRF on CVD mortality has not been widely considered...
June 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576674/public-park-spaces-as-a-platform-to-promote-healthy-living-introducing-a-healthpark-concept
#17
REVIEW
Ross Arena, Samantha Bond, Robert O'Neill, Deepika R Laddu, Andrew P Hills, Carl J Lavie, Amy McNeil
The concept of Healthy Living (HL) as a primary medical intervention continues to gain traction, and rightfully so. Being physically active, consuming a nutritious diet, not smoking and maintaining an appropriate body weight constitute the HL polypill, the foundation of HL medicine (HLM). Daily use of the HL polypill, working toward optimal dosages, portends profound health benefits, substantially reducing the risk of chronic disease [i.e., cardiovascular disease (CVD), pulmonary disease, metabolic syndromes, certain cancers, etc...
June 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28502849/the-interaction-of-cardiorespiratory-fitness-with-obesity-and-the-obesity-paradox-in-cardiovascular-disease
#18
REVIEW
Ahmet Afşin Oktay, Carl J Lavie, Peter F Kokkinos, Parham Parto, Ambarish Pandey, Hector O Ventura
Overweight and obesity are well-established risk factors for most cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure (HF), and atrial fibrillation. Despite the strong link between excess adiposity and risk of CVD, growing evidence has demonstrated an obesity paradox in patients with CVD. This phenomenon is characterized by a better prognosis in overweight and mildly obese CVD patients than their leaner counterparts. Moreover, the worst outcomes are often incurred by underweight CVD patients, followed by those of normal weight or severely obese...
June 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28502848/exercise-training-in-athletes-with-heart-disease
#19
REVIEW
Antonio B Fernandez, Paul D Thompson
Exercise events and sport participation have increased over recent decades. The average age of sports participants has also increased with a potential parallel increase in the number of exercise participants with both occult and diagnosed cardiovascular disease (CVD). Habitual physical activity and exercise training reduce atherosclerotic CVD (ASCVD) risk in a curvilinear fashion by affecting multiple ASCVD risk factors. Nonetheless, exercise also increases the risk of sudden cardiac death in both young and adult individuals with occult CVD making it important to balance the risks and benefits of exercise and exercise training in these individuals...
June 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28385556/high-intensity-interval-training-for-maximizing-health-outcomes
#20
REVIEW
Trine Karlsen, Inger-Lise Aamot, Mark Haykowsky, Øivind Rognmo
Regular physical activity and exercise training are important actions to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and maintain health throughout life. There is solid evidence that exercise is an effective preventative strategy against at least 25 medical conditions, including cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, colon and breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Traditionally, endurance exercise training (ET) to improve health related outcomes has consisted of low- to moderate ET intensity. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that higher exercise intensities may be superior to moderate intensity for maximizing health outcomes...
June 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
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