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Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29458056/alcohol-and-cv-health-jekyll-and-hyde-j-curves
#1
REVIEW
Evan L O'Keefe, James J Di Nicolantonio, James H O'Keefe, Carl J Lavie
A routine of light or moderate alcohol consumption (≤1 drink/day for women and 1 to 2 drinks/day for men) were associated with a lower risk for all-cause mortality, coronary artery disease (CAD), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), heart failure (HF), and stroke. Conversely, heavy drinking, (>4 drinks/day) is associated with an increased risk for death and cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD). Excessive alcohol intake trails behind only smoking and obesity among the 3 leading causes of premature deaths in the United States (US)...
February 16, 2018: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29452135/evidence-based-exercise-recommendations-to-reduce-hepatic-fat-content-in-youth-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#2
REVIEW
María Medrano, Cristina Cadenas-Sanchez, Celia Álvarez-Bueno, Iván Cavero-Redondo, Jonatan R Ruiz, Francisco B Ortega, Idoia Labayen
The main purposes of this study were to elucidate the effects of supervised-exercise training (ET) interventions on hepatic fat content and on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) prevalence in children and adolescents and to provide information about the optimal ET prescription (type, intensity, volume, and frequency) needed to reduce hepatic fat content in youths. Supervised-ET interventions performed in children and adolescents (6-19 years) that provided results of exercise effects on hepatic fat content or NAFLD prevalence were included...
February 13, 2018: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29452134/effect-of-high-intensity-interval-training-on-cardiac-function-in-children-with-obesity-a-randomised-controlled-trial
#3
REVIEW
Charlotte B Ingul, Katrin A Dias, Arnt E Tjonna, Turid Follestad, Mansoureh S Hosseini, Anita S Timilsina, Siri M Hollekim-Strand, Torstein B Ro, Peter S W Davies, Peter A Cain, Gary M Leong, Jeff S Coombes
BACKGROUND: High intensity interval training (HIIT) confers superior cardiovascular health benefits to moderate intensity continuous training (MICT) in adults and may be efficacious for improving diminished cardiac function in obese children. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of HIIT, MICT and nutrition advice interventions on resting left ventricular (LV) peak systolic tissue velocity (S') in obese children. METHODS: Ninety-nine obese children were randomised into one of three 12-week interventions, 1) HIIT [n = 33, 4 × 4 min bouts at 85-95% maximum heart rate (HR max ), 3 times/week] and nutrition advice, 2) MICT [n = 32, 44 mins at 60-70% HR max , 3 times/week] and nutrition advice, and 3) nutrition advice only (nutrition) [n = 34]...
February 13, 2018: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29397950/triple-antithrombotic-therapy-for-patients-with-atrial-fibrillation-undergoing-percutaneous-coronary-intervention
#4
REVIEW
Mathieu Kerneis, Usama Talib, Tarek Nafee, Yazan Daaboul, Seyedmahdi Pahlavani, Anmol Pitliya, M M Furqan, Sudarshana Datta, Hassan A Kazmi, Ahmed Younes, C Michael Gibson
Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) has been the cornerstone of antithrombotic management for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, approximately 10% of these patients have concomitant atrial fibrillation (AF) and require chronic oral anticoagulant (OAC) in addition to DAPT. This traditional "triple therapy" has been associated with a three to four-fold increased risk of bleeding. The safety of non-vitamin K OAC (NOAC)-based strategies, using a NOAC plus a P2Y12 inhibitor, has been compared to vitamin K antagonist (VKA)-based triple therapy in the PIONEER AF-PCI and REDUAL PCI randomized trials, both of which have demonstrated that NOAC-based strategies are safer and provide an attractive alternative to VKA-based triple therapy among AF patients who undergo PCI...
February 2, 2018: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29409813/duration-of-dual-antiplatelet-therapy-for-stented-patients-an-update-for-the-clinician
#5
REVIEW
Mahesh K Vidula, Eric A Secemsky, Robert W Yeh
Determining the optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) following percutaneous coronary intervention is a complex decision. Randomized controlled trials have shown that while shorter durations of DAPT may lower the risk of bleeding, longer durations of DAPT can reduce the risk of late stent thrombosis and ischemia-related events. In this review article, we will discuss the current guidelines, review contemporary trial data that have evaluated short and extended durations of DAPT, and address common clinical questions...
February 1, 2018: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29366879/the-waxing-and-waning-of-antithrombotic-therapy-in-cardiovascular-disease-where-is-the-moon-now
#6
EDITORIAL
Mark B Effron, C Michael Gibson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 21, 2018: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29360524/dual-anticoagulant-plus-single-antiplatelet-vs-triple-anticoagulant-plus-dual-antiplatelet-antithrombotic-therapy-real-world-experience
#7
REVIEW
Mark B Effron, C Michael Gibson
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia that increases in prevalence with advancing age and in patients with coronary artery disease, revascularization, particularly with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), is also common. Both disease states have thrombosis as a core pathophysiologic process which requires treatment - low sheer stress thrombi in AF and intracoronary high sheer stress thrombi in PCI. For the 10-20% of patients who have both AF and undergo PCI, preventing thrombotic complications will require inhibition of both processes requiring simultaneous use of anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy...
January 20, 2018: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29360523/thiamine-and-cardiovascular-disease-a-literature-review
#8
REVIEW
James J DiNicolantonio, Jing Liu, James H O'Keefe
Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin that plays an important role in the energy metabolism in the human body. Deficiency in thiamine can lead to neurological abnormalities and congestive heart failure (HF), known as dry beriberi and wet beriberi respectively. Several populations are at higher risk for thiamine deficiency, most notably persons with chronic alcoholism. This article aims to provide a review of current literature on the role of thiamine in the human body, the current scope of thiamine deficiency, and explore the specific effects of thiamine deficiency and supplementation on the cardiovascular system...
January 19, 2018: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29341881/clinical-implications-of-technological-advances-in-screening-for-atrial-fibrillation
#9
REVIEW
Nikhil Singh, Sung Chun, David Hadley, Victor Froelicher
The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) continues to increase worldwide as people live longer. AF is the leading cause of stroke among patients older than 75 years and is responsible for at least 15% of all strokes. Industry has responded to this problem with a plethora of monitoring devices. These include single lead ECG adhesive sensors, implantable loop recorders, smartphone attachments and wearables. This review will concentrate on clinical studies using these technologies. There are wearables including watches and watch-like devices that will be mentioned but these have not been validated for clinical use...
January 13, 2018: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29339169/the-timing-of-p2y12-inhibitor-initiation-in-the-treatment-of-acs-does-the-evidence-exist-in-this-era
#10
REVIEW
Harsh Golwala, Deepak L Bhatt
The majority of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are well characterized as a consequence of plaque rupture and subsequent thrombosis. Antiplatelet agents targeting inhibition of P2Y12 receptors on the platelets have shown to reduce future risk of cardiovascular events in this patient population. However, the timing of initiation of these agents, in particular, in patients managed with invasive strategy with percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) is debatable. The data supporting pretreatment with antiplatelet agents prior to PCI in ACS patients dates to trials performed >15 years ago, wherein the time to PCI was >5 days, and henceforth, the utility of pretreatment with these agents in the contemporary era remains uncertain...
January 12, 2018: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29339168/selection-of-p2y12-inhibitor-in-percutaneous-coronary-intervention-and-or-acute-coronary-syndrome
#11
REVIEW
Udaya Tantry, Eliano P Navarese, Aung Myat, Paul Gurbel
The P2Y12 receptor plays a critical role in the amplification of platelet aggregation in response to various agonists and stable thrombus generation at the site of vascular injury leading to deleterious ischemic complications. Therefore, treatment with a P2Y12 receptor blocker is a major effective strategy to prevent ischemic complications in high -risk patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The determination of optimal platelet inhibition is based on maximizing antithrombotic properties while minimizing bleeding risk and is critically dependent on individual patient's propensity for thrombotic and bleeding risks...
January 12, 2018: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29339167/comparison-of-anticoagulant-therapy-for-atrial-fibrillation-novel-oral-anticoagulants-versus-vitamin-k-antagonists
#12
REVIEW
Sean T Chen, Manesh R Patel
In patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), oral anticoagulation is important for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism (SE). While Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) have historically been the standard of care, these medications are limited by numerous food and drug interactions with onerous requirements for frequent monitoring and dose adjustments. Over the past decade, several novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been developed to directly inhibit factor IIa/thrombin (dabigatran) or activated factor X (apixaban, rivaroxaban, edoxaban)...
January 12, 2018: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29339166/anticoagulation-in-acute-coronary-syndrome-state-of-the-art
#13
REVIEW
Michel Zeitouni, Mathieu Kerneis, Tarek Nafee, Jean-Philippe Collet, Johanne Silvain, Gilles Montalescot
Early intravenous anticoagulation is the corner stone treatment of patients admitted with an acute coronary syndrome: it antagonizes the ongoing coronary thrombosis and facilitates the percutaneous coronary intervention, hence a reduction of mortality and acute stent thrombosis. Unfractionated heparin, enoxaparin, bivalirudin and fondaparinux have been extensively studied in large randomized control trials and meta-analyses with the same objective: reducing the ischemic burden without hiking hemorrhagic events...
January 12, 2018: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29339165/safety-and-efficacy-of-transcatheter-left-atrial-appendage-closure-for-stroke-prevention-in-patients-with-atrial-fibrillation
#14
REVIEW
Matthew J Price
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with a substantial risk of thromboembolic stroke. Although long-term treatment with warfarin or the non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants can reduce this risk, such therapy is underutilized, and safe and consistent long-term treatment can be challenging. Transcatheter left atrial appendage (LAA) closure is an emerging alternative to long-term oral anticoagulation. Long-term follow-up of randomized clinical trials demonstrate that Watchman LAA closure provides significant reductions in hemorrhagic stroke, cardiovascular death, and all-cause mortality compared with continued warfarin therapy...
January 12, 2018: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29291428/aspirin-for-primary-prevention-of-atherosclerotic-cardiovascular-disease-in-adults-80-years-of-age-and-older
#15
LETTER
G Blair Sarbacker, Kathleen A Lusk, Bethany Kalich
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 29, 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29291427/pulmonary-embolism-care-standards-in-2018
#16
REVIEW
Ariel Borohovitz, Mitchell D Weinberg, Ido Weinberg
Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a leading cause of cardiovascular mortality worldwide. Clinical presentation can be diverse, and clinicians should have a high index of suspicion regarding the diagnosis. Evaluation should include detailed history of possible risk factors, physical examination and laboratory tests that would support the diagnosis and help risk-stratify patients. Finally, a dedicated imaging study should be performed in order to make a definitive diagnosis. Decisions regarding short-term, immediate, treatment are dictated by PE risk category...
December 29, 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29291426/evolution-of-coronary-stent-technology-and-implications-for-duration-of-dual-antiplatelet-therapy
#17
REVIEW
Jae Youn Moon, Francesco Franchi, Fabiana Rollini, Dominick J Angiolillo
Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) has represented for decades the cornerstone of treatment for the prevention of ischemic complications, including stent thrombosis, in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Despite the evolution in stent technologies, which has allowed the reduction in the minimum required duration of DAPT, the optimal duration of DAPT to ensure the best safety and efficacy still remains largely debated. Indeed, the results from investigations regarding the optimal DAPT duration based on stent type is limited...
December 29, 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29289494/quantifying-time-in-atrial-fibrillation-and-the-need-for-anticoagulation
#18
REVIEW
Kazuo Miyazawa, Daniele Pastori, Gregory Y H Lip
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the major cardiovascular diseases, and the number of patients with AF is predicted to increase markedly in the coming years. Despite recent advance in management of patients with AF, AF remains one of the main causes of stroke or systemic embolism. Application of simple stroke risk-stratification schemes, such as the CHA2DS2-VASc score has been introduced to identify patients who mostly benefit from oral anticoagulants (OACs) for stroke prevention. Current medical devices allow the detection of short and asymptomatic episodes of AF, termed atrial high rate episodes (AHREs), which are also associated with an increased risk of thromboembolism...
December 28, 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29277295/duration-of-dual-antiplatelet-therapy-following-drug-eluting-stent-implantation-in-diabetic-and-non-diabetic-patients-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis-of-randomized-controlled-trials
#19
REVIEW
Abhishek Sharma, Aakash Garg, Sammy Elmariah, Douglas Drachman, Chukwudi Obiagwu, Ajay Vallakati, Samin K Sharma, Carl J Lavie, Debabrata Mukherjee, Ron Waksman, Giulio G Stefanini, Fausto Feres, Jonathan D Marmur, Gérard Helft
BACKGROUND: Diabetic patients account for an increasing number of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with increased residual platelet activity during dual antiplatelet treatment (DAPT) and DM patients have worse clinical outcomes after PCI as compared to non-DM. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate efficacy and safety of short duration DAPT (S-DAPT) and long duration DAPT (L-DAPT) after drug eluting stent (DES) implantation in DM and non-DM patients...
December 22, 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29225114/fructose-induced-inflammation-and-increased-cortisol-a-new-mechanism-for-how-sugar-induces-visceral-adiposity
#20
REVIEW
James J DiNicolantonio, Varshil Mehta, Neema Onkaramurthy, James H O'Keefe
Traditionally, the leading hypothesis regarding the development of obesity involves caloric imbalance, whereby the amount of calories consumed exceeds the amount of calories burned which causes obesity. Another hypothesis for why we get fat has surfaced in the last decade which is the idea that the overconsumption of added sugars and refined carbohydrates induce insulin resistance and high insulin levels causing obesity. While insulin is a fat-storing hormone, this hypothesis does not explain visceral adiposity, or why certain people are found to have fat stored in and around their organs...
December 7, 2017: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
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