journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Journal of Social Psychology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28934069/to-defend-or-to-affiliate-the-effects-of-categorical-similarity-cues-after-social-exclusion
#1
Jia-Sin Hong, Chien-Ru Sun
This article proposed that after social exclusion, individuals may react in a hostile or amiable manner, which depends on the type of categorical similarity cues that new groups possess. For excluded individuals, groups that resemble their excluder would provoke a defensive attitude. They also exhibit hospitality to groups that resemble themselves to gain inclusion. In experiment 1, social exclusion was manipulated by providing a scenario story regarding an individual who was excluded and subsequently wanted to join in new groups...
September 21, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28934022/tattoo-or-taboo-tattoo-stigma-and-negative-attitudes-toward-tattooed-individuals
#2
Kristin A Broussard, Helen C Harton
Tattoos are common in the United States; however, tattooed persons may be perceived as having more negative character and as more deviant than people without tattoos. College students (Study 1) and community members (Study 2) viewed images of men and women with tattoos or the same images with the tattoos digitally removed and rated the targets' characteristics. Half of the participants viewed a target with a tattoo, and half viewed that target without it, allowing for both within- (participants all rated one male and one female target with a tattoo and another without) and between-participants (participants rated either the tattooed or non-tattooed version of a single target) comparisons...
September 21, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922077/corrigendum
#3
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 18, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28873042/too-many-asians-in-universities-the-effect-of-social-dominance-orientation-on-support-for-admissions-limits
#4
Angelica Gutierrez
This paper tests the hypothesis that support for limits on the admission of Asian students into universities is motivated by people's social motivation - namely the desire to maintain the status hierarchy. Study 1 found that, among participants who evaluated a proposed limit to the number of Asian applicants admitted to universities, social dominance orientation (SDO) was positively related to policy support. Conversely, among participants who evaluated a proposed limit on White admits, SDO was negatively related to policy support...
September 5, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28862924/sex-differences-in-jealousy-the-lack-of-influence-of-researcher-theoretical-perspective
#5
John Edlund, Jeremy D Heider, Austin Lee Nichols, Randy J McCarthy, Sarah E Wood, Cory R Scherer, Jessica L Hartnett, Richard Walker
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 1, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28846063/how-predictions-of-economic-behavior-are-affected-by-the-socio-economic-status-of-the-target-person
#6
Anna Lindqvist, Fredrik Björklund
We investigate how the stereotype of the poor (vs. middle class) influences behavioral predictions. In Study 1, participants made predictions regarding another person's economic behavior in scenarios pertaining to rate of time preferences (loss, gain of smaller and larger amount). We find that participants, across scenarios, expect individuals with low SES to show more short-sightedness-i.e., steeper temporal discounting. This pattern persisted until strong diagnostic information about previous economic behavior was provided...
August 28, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28805548/when-is-a-lie-acceptable-work-and-private-life-lying-acceptance-depends-on-its-beneficiary
#7
Katarzyna Cantarero, Piotr Szarota, Eftychia Stamkou, Marisol Navas, Alejandra Del Carmen Dominguez Espinosa
In this article we show that when analyzing attitude towards lying in a cross-cultural setting, both the beneficiary of the lie (self vs other) and the context (private life vs. professional domain) should be considered. In a study conducted in Estonia, Ireland, Mexico, The Netherlands, Poland, Spain, and Sweden (N = 1345), in which participants evaluated stories presenting various types of lies, we found usefulness of relying on the dimensions. Results showed that in the joint sample the most acceptable were other-oriented lies concerning private life, then other-oriented lies in the professional domain, followed by egoistic lies in the professional domain; and the least acceptance was shown for egoistic lies regarding one's private life...
August 14, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28799889/individual-and-social-correlates-of-aggressive-behavior-in-lebanese-undergraduates-the-role-of-trait-emotional-intelligence
#8
Maria-Jose Sanchez-Ruiz, Amal Baaklini
This study investigates the relationship between Aggressive Behavior and individual factors, namely trait Emotional Intelligence, personality dimensions, emotion regulation and self-worth, as well as social factors, namely accepting/rejecting parenting styles and exposure to violence. The sample consisted of 252 university students in Lebanon (154 females), from 16 to 30 years old. Results from hierarchical regression analyses (controlling for age and gender and in the presence of social and individual predictors) showed that the Self-control and Emotionality factors of trait Emotional Intelligence were significant negative predictors of Aggressive Behavior while controlling for age and gender, and in the presence of social and individual predictors)...
August 11, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28783471/investigating-interdependent-self-in-post-communist-countries-a-comparison-of-two-slovak-and-danish-generations
#9
Radka Antalíková, Tia G B Hansen, Manuel L de la Mata, Rafael Martínez
Some evidence suggests prevalence of collectivist values and interdependent self in post-communist Europe. However, research on social representations identifies a possible divide between Eastern Europeans' appreciation of their immediate social environment on the one hand and their suspicion towards impersonal collectives on the other. The current study aimed to capture this divide by investigating two types of interdependent self, namely relational and collective. Specifically, we compared self-descriptions in two Slovak samples-"old" with a communist experience (n = 80) and "young" without it (n = 80)-and used a country that has never been communist (Denmark; n = 80 x 2) to control for age effects...
August 7, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28783469/the-effect-of-research-method-type-on-stereotypes-content-a-brief-research-report
#10
Daniel David, Aurelian Bizo, Alina Ioana Cimpean, Horea Oltean, Roxana Cardos, Radu Soflau, Alexandra Negut
Stereotype Content Model (SCM) emphasizes the content rather than the underlying processes of the stereotypes and the content might be influenced by several cultural dimensions (e.g., individualism vs. collectivism). The main dimensions of SCM, - namely warmth and competence-, underlying various contents, are assumed to be universal. However, from a cognitive science paradigm, we argue that different research methods (i.e., data collections and data analysis) might also yield different stereotype contents that might impact the universality versus specificity problem in the SCM...
August 7, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28692345/emotional-intelligence-and-ocb-the-moderating-role-of-work-locus-of-control
#11
David L Turnipseed
This study sought to identify linkages between Mayer, Salovey, and Caruso's (2008) four dimensions of emotional intelligence (EI) and organizational citizenship behavior, and the moderating influence of locus of control. Using a sample of 290 employed students, the present study examines the effects of the dimensions of EI on OCB directed at individuals (OCB-I) and OCB directed at the organization (OCB-O). Emotionally intelligent individuals were hypothesized to engage in more organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) than individuals with lower EI...
July 10, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28657478/promoting-beliefs-in-the-inalienability-of-human-rights-by-attributing-uniquely-human-emotions-through-multiple-categorization
#12
Flavia Albarello, Richard Crisp, Monica Rubini
The combination of multiple categorization (i.e., the use of multiple criteria to define others) and human identity-the superordinate group of human beings-has recently been highlighted as a method to reduce implicit (i.e., attribution of secondary emotions) and explicit (i.e., attribution of human rights) dehumanization toward Blacks. In two studies aimed to replicate such evidence the mediating role of secondary emotions in explaining the impact of multiple and human categorization in reducing dehumanization was assessed...
June 28, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28636527/evaluating-performance-over-time-is-improving-better-than-being-consistently-good
#13
Monica Soliman, Roger Buehler
In many decision contexts, people evaluate others based on intertemporal performance records and commonly face a choice between two distinct profiles: performance that is consistently high versus performance that improves over time to that high level. We proposed that these two profiles could be appealing for different reasons, and thus evaluators' preferences will differ across decision contexts. In three studies, participants were presented with candidates (e.g., students, employees) displaying the two profiles, and evaluated each candidate in terms of performance, future expectations, and deservingness...
June 21, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28614000/prototypes-and-same-gender-bias-in-perceptions-of-hiring-discrimination
#14
Rickard Carlsson, Samantha Sinclair
The present study investigated the relative importance of two explanations behind perceptions of gender discrimination in hiring: prototypes and same-gender bias. According to the prototype explanation, people perceive an event as discrimination to the extent that it fits their preconceptions of typical discrimination. In contrast, the same-gender bias explanation asserts that people more readily detect discrimination towards members of their own gender. In four experiments (n = 797), women and men made considerably stronger discrimination attributions, and were moderately more discouraged from seeking work, when the victim was female rather than male...
June 14, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28613995/fear-of-self-annihilation-and-existential-uncertainty-as-predictors-of-worldview-defense-comparing-terror-management-and-uncertainty-theories
#15
Mark Rubin
Terror management theory (TMT) proposes that thoughts of death trigger a concern about self-annihilation that motivates the defense of cultural worldviews. In contrast, uncertainty theorists propose that thoughts of death trigger feelings of uncertainty that motivate worldview defense. University students (N = 414) completed measures of the chronic fear of self-annihilation and existential uncertainty as well as the need for closure. They then evaluated either a meaning threat stimulus or a control stimulus...
June 14, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521625/power-and-provocativeness-the-effects-of-subtle-changes-in-clothing-on-perceptions-of-working-women
#16
Regan A R Gurung, Elizabeth Punke, Michaella Brickner, Vincenzio Badalamenti
The current study investigates the effects of subtle changes in professional women's dress on women's perceptions of power and competence. We replicate and extend Howlett, Pine, Cahill, Orakcioglu, and Fletcher's (2015) research showing women in provocative clothing are rated as less competent. We used a larger sample, tested a second independent variable, and fine-tuned the design for higher face validity. Participants (N = 198, 170 women and 29 men) from a Midwestern university in the USA rated four photographs of professionally dressed women whose blouses varied in the number of buttons left undone and whether they wore a camisole...
May 19, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521599/religious-involvement-and-happiness-assessing-the-mediating-role-of-compassion-and-helping-others
#17
Neal Krause, Gail Ironson, Peter Hill
Research reveals that a number of different aspects of religious involvement are associated with happiness. However, researchers have yet to provide an overarching theoretical explanation for how multiple dimensions of religion might be associated with happiness. The purpose of this study is to develop and test a conceptual model that includes the following core hypotheses: (1) people who attend worship services more often tend to be more committed to their faith; (2) people who are more committed to their faith are more likely to be compassionate; (3) compassionate individuals are more likely to provide emotional support to significant others; and (4) people who provide support to others tend to be happier...
May 19, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28481739/the-effects-of-monitoring-environment-on-problem-solving-performance
#18
Brian K Laird, Charles D Bailey, Kim Hester
While effective and efficient solving of everyday problems is important in business domains, little is known about the effects of workplace monitoring on problem-solving performance. In a laboratory experiment, we explored the monitoring environment's effects on an individual's propensity to (1) establish pattern solutions to problems, (2) recognize when pattern solutions are no longer efficient, and (3) solve complex problems. Under three work monitoring regimes-no monitoring, human monitoring, and electronic monitoring-114 participants solved puzzles for monetary rewards...
May 8, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28481736/is-more-always-better-an-examination-of-the-nonlinear-effects-of-perceived-organizational-support-on-individual-outcomes
#19
Kenneth J Harris, K Michele Kacmar
A wide range of research has accumulated detailing the positive associations of perceived organizational support (POS) with desirable workplace outcomes (e.g., high performance, high commitment, low deviance). In the process, there has been an implicit assumption that these relationships are linear, with ever-increasing POS resulting in ever-increasing positive outcomes. However, there are theoretical and practical reasons to question whether these relationships may be nonlinear rather than linear. Our results offer support for the notion that the relationships between POS and key individual outcomes rated by the supervisor may best be represented as nonlinear...
May 8, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28481719/kill-or-cure-different-types-of-social-class-identification-amplify-and-buffer-the-relation-between-social-class-and-mental-health
#20
Mark Rubin, Rebecca Stuart
The present research investigated different types of social class identification as moderators of the negative relation between social class and mental health problems. Psychology undergraduates (N = 355) completed an online survey that included measures of social class, mental health and well-being, and three aspects of social class identification: importance of identity, salience of identity, and perceived self-class similarity. Perceived self-class similarity buffered the negative association between social class and depressive symptoms...
May 8, 2017: Journal of Social Psychology
journal
journal
23886
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"