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Journal of Neurophysiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29142100/abnormal-visual-gain-control-and-excitotoxicity-in-early-onset-parkinson-s-disease-drosophila-models
#1
Marc Mason Himmelberg, Ryan J H West, Christopher J H Elliott, Alex R Wade
The excitotoxic theory of Parkinson's disease (PD) hypothesises that a pathophysiological degeneration of dopaminergic neurons stems from neural hyperactivity at early stages of disease, leading to mitochondrial stress and cell death. Recent research has harnessed the visual system of Drosophila PD models to probe this hypothesis. Here, we investigate whether abnormal visual sensitivity and excitotoxicity occur in early-onset PD Drosophila models DJ-1Δ72, DJ1-Δ93, and PINK15. We used an electroretinogram to record steady state visually evoked potentials driven by temporal contrast stimuli...
November 15, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29142099/assessing-tms-induced-d-and-i-waves-with-spinal-h-reflexes
#2
Niclas Niemann, Patrick Wiegel, Alexander Kurz, John C Rothwell, Christian Leukel
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of motor cortex produces a series of descending volleys known as D- (direct) and I- (indirect) waves. In the present study, we questioned whether spinal H-reflexes can be used to dissect D-waves, early and late I-waves from TMS. We therefore probed H-reflex facilitation at arrival times of D- and I-waves at the spinal level and thereby changed TMS parameters that have previously been shown to have selective effects on evoked D- and different I-waves. We changed TMS intensity and current direction, and applied a double-pulse paradigm known as short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI)...
November 15, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29142098/the-acquisition-of-skilled-finger-movements-is-accompanied-by-the-reorganization-of-the-corticospinal-system
#3
Masato Hirano, Shinji Kubota, Shinichi Furuya, Yoshiki Koizume, Shinya Tanaka, Kozo Funase
Dexterous finger movements are often characterized by highly coordinated movements. Such coordination might be derived from reorganization of the corticospinal system. In this study, we investigated 1) the manner in which finger movement covariation patterns are acquired by examining the effects of the implicit and explicit learning of a serial reaction time task (SRTT), and 2) how such changes in finger coordination are represented in the corticospinal system. The subjects learned a button press sequence in both implicit and explicit learning conditions...
November 15, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29142097/fast-oscillation-dynamics-during-hypsarrhythmia-as-a-localization-biomarker
#4
Min-Jee Kim, Mi-Sun Yum, Hye-Ryun Yeh, Tae-Sung Ko
Hypsarrhythmia in West syndrome, although hard to define, is characterized by chaotic and disorganized electrical activity of the brain and is often regarded as a generalized EEG pattern without any localization value. Using event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP), we tried to determine the brain dynamics during hypsarrhythmia. Routine 1-h scalp EEGs were retrieved from 31 patients with infantile spasms and 20 age-matched controls. Using the EEGLAB toolbox of MATLAB 2015b, the ERSPs of fast oscillations (FOs; 20-100 Hz) of selected channels were analyzed and compared among groups according to their MRI lesions...
November 15, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29142096/novel-ca-2-dependent-mechanisms-regulate-spontaneous-release-at-excitatory-synapses-onto-ca1-pyramidal-cells
#5
Walter E Babiec, Thomas J O'Dell
Although long thought to simply be a source of synaptic noise, spontaneous, action-potential independent release of neurotransmitter from presynaptic terminals has multiple roles in synaptic function. We explored whether and to what extent the two predominantly proposed mechanisms for explaining spontaneous release, stochastic activation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) or activation of Ca(2+)-sensing receptors (CaSRs) by extracelluar Ca(2+), played a role in the sensitivity of spontaneous release to the level of extracellular Ca(2+) concentration at excitatory synapses at CA1 pyramidal cells of the adult, male mouse hippocampus...
November 15, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29142095/patterns-of-intermuscular-inhibitory-force-feedback-across-cat-hindlimbs-suggest-a-flexible-system-for-regulating-whole-limb-mechanics
#6
Mark A Lyle, T Richard Nichols
Prior work has suggested that Golgi tendon organ feedback, via its distributed network linking muscles spanning all joints, could be used by the nervous system to help regulate whole limb mechanics if appropriately organized. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing the patterns of intermuscular force dependent feedback between the primary extensor muscles spanning the knee, ankle and toes in decerebrate cat hindlimbs. Intermuscular force feedback was evaluated by stretching tendons of selected muscles in isolation and in pairwise combinations and then measuring the resulting force dependent intermuscular interactions...
November 15, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29142094/standardized-automated-training-of-rhesus-monkeys-for-neuroscience-research-in-their-housing-environment
#7
Michael Berger, Antonino Calapai, Valeska Stephan, Michael Niessing, Leonore Burchardt, Alexander Gail, Stefan Treue
Teaching non-human primates the complex cognitive behavioral tasks that are central to cognitive neuroscience research is an essential and challenging endeavor. It is crucial for the scientific success that the animals learn to interpret the often complex task rules, and reliably and enduringly act accordingly. To achieve consistent behavior and comparable learning histories across animals, it is desirable to standardize training protocols. Automatizing the training can significantly reduce the time invested by the person training the animal...
November 15, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29142093/developmental-changes-in-spinal-neuronal-properties-motor-network-configuration-and-neuromodulation-at-free-swimming-stages-of-xenopus-frog-tadpoles
#8
Stephen Paul Currie, Keith Thomas Sillar
We describe a novel preparation of the isolated brainstem and spinal cord from pro-metamorphic tadpole stages of the South African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) that permits whole cell patch-clamp recordings from neurons in the ventral spinal cord. Previous research on earlier stages of the same species has provided one of the most detailed understandings of the design and operation of a CPG circuit. Here we have addressed how development sculpts complexity from this more basic circuit. The preparation generates bouts of fictive swimming activity either spontaneously or in response to electrical stimulation of the optic tectum, allowing an investigation into how the neuronal properties, activity patterns and neuromodulation of locomotor rhythm generation change during development...
November 15, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29142092/response-of-supra-oculomotor-area-neurons-during-combined-saccade-vergence-movements
#9
Adam C Pallus, Mark M G Walton, Michael J Mustari
Combined saccade-vergence movements allow humans and other primates to align their eyes with objects of interest in three-dimensions. In the absence of saccades, vergence movements are typically slow, symmetrical movements of the two eyes in opposite directions. However, combined saccade-vergence movements produce vergence velocities that exceed values observed during vergence alone. This phenomenon is often called "vergence enhancement", or "saccade-facilitated vergence," though it is important to consider that rapid vergence changes, known as "vergence transients," are also observed during conjugate saccades...
November 15, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29142091/physiological-and-pathophysiological-firing-properties-of-single-postganglionic-sympathetic-neurons-in-humans
#10
Vaughan G Macefield, B Gunnar Wallin
It has long been known from microneurographic recordings in human subjects that activity of postganglionic sympathetic axons occurs as spontaneous bursts, with muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) exhibiting strong cardiac rhythmicity via the baroreflex and skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) showing much weaker cardiac modulation. Here we review the firing properties of single sympathetic neurons, obtained using highly selective microelectrodes. Individual vasoconstrictor neurons supplying muscle or skin, or sudomotor neurones supplying sweat glands, always discharge with a low firing probability (~30%) and at very low frequencies (~0...
November 15, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118202/bayesian-optimal-adaptation-explains-age-related-human-sensorimotor-changes
#11
Faisal Karmali, Gregory T Whitman, Richard F Lewis
The brain uses information from different sensory systems to guide motor behavior, and aging is associated with a simultaneous decline in the quality of sensory information provided to the brain and a deterioration in motor control. Correlations between age-dependent decline in sensory anatomical structures and behavior have been demonstrated, and it has recently been suggested that a Bayesian framework could explain these relationships. Here we show that age-dependent changes in a human sensorimotor reflex, the vestibulo-ocular reflex, are explained by a Bayesian optimal adaptation in the brain occurring in response to death of motion-sensing hair cells...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118201/inflow-of-oxygen-and-glucose-into-brain-tissue-induced-by-intravenous-norepinephrine-relationships-with-central-metabolic-and-peripheral-vascular-responses
#12
R Aaron Bola, Eugene A Kiyatkin
As an essential part of sympathetic activation that prepares the organism for "fight or flight," peripheral norepinephrine (NE) plays an important role in regulating cardiac activity and the tone of blood vessels, increasing blood flow to the heart and the brain and decreasing blood flow to the organs not as necessary for immediate survival. To assess whether this effect is applicable to the brain, we used high-speed amperometry to measure the changes in nucleus accumbens (NAc) levels of oxygen and glucose induced by intravenous (iv) injections of NE in awake, freely-moving rats...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118200/vestibular-short-latency-evoked-potential-vsep-is-abolished-by-low-frequency-noise-exposure-in-rats
#13
Courtney Elaine Stewart, Ariane C Kanicki, Richard A Altschuler, W Michael King
The vestibular system plays a critical role in detection of head movements and is essential for normal postural control. Because of their anatomical proximity to the cochlea, the otolith organs are selectively exposed to sound pressure and are at risk for noise overstimulation. Clinical reports suggest a link between noise exposure and balance problems, but the structural and physiological basis for this linkage is not well understood. The goal of this study is to determine the effects of low frequency noise (LFN), on the otolith organs by correlating changes in vestibular short latency evoked potentials, (VsEPs), with changes in saccular afferent endings following noise exposure...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118199/rapid-feedback-responses-are-flexibly-coordinated-across-arm-muscles-to-support-goal-directed-reaching
#14
Jeffrey Weiler, Paul L Gribble, J Andrew Pruszynski
A transcortical pathway helps support goal-directed reaching by processing somatosensory information to produce rapid feedback responses across multiple joints and muscles. We tested whether such feedback responses can account for changes in arm configuration and for arbitrary visuomotor transformations - two manipulations that alter how muscles at the elbow and wrist need to be coordinated to achieve task success. Participants used a planar three degree-of-freedom exoskeleton robot to move a cursor to a target following a mechanical perturbation that flexed the elbow...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118198/a-fast-invariant-representation-for-human-action-in-the-visual-system
#15
Leyla Isik, Andrea Tacchetti, Tomaso A Poggio
Humans can effortlessly recognize others' actions in the presence of complex transformations, such as changes in viewpoint. Several studies have located the regions in the brain involved in invariant action recognition, however, the underlying neural computations remain poorly understood. We use magnetoencephalography (MEG) decoding and a dataset of well-controlled, naturalistic videos of five actions (run, walk, jump, eat, drink) performed by different actors at different viewpoints to study the computational steps used to recognize actions across complex transformations...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118197/control-of-saccadic-latency-in-a-dynamic-environment-allocation-of-saccades-in-time-follows-the-matching-law
#16
Cécile Vullings, Laurent Madelain
When exploring the visual environment, one uses saccades to shift gaze and fixation to gather spatially and temporally localized information. We propose that the temporal structure of our environment should constrain the temporal allocation of saccades. Here, we probe the possibility of learning to control saccadic latencies in a choice paradigm. Six participants made saccades within 80-300ms following a target horizontally stepping by 10 deg between two fixed locations. For each participant we constructed two classes of latencies, "short" and "long", using the first and last quartiles of the individual baseline distribution (e...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118196/the-involvement-of-n-methyl-d-aspartate-receptors-in-plasticity-induced-by-paired-corticospinal-motoneuronal-stimulation-in-humans
#17
Siobhan C Donges, Jessica M D'Amico, Jane E Butler, Janet L Taylor
Plasticity can be induced at human corticospinal-motoneuronal synapses by delivering repeated, paired stimuli to corticospinal axons and motoneurones in a technique called paired corticospinal-motoneuronal stimulation (PCMS). To date, the mechanisms of the induced plasticity are unknown. To determine whether PCMS-induced plasticity is dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), the effect of the non-competitive NMDAR antagonist, dextromethorphan, on PCMS-induced facilitation was assessed in a two-day, double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118195/binocular-deprivation-induces-both-age-dependent-and-age-independent-forms-of-plasticity-in-parvalbumin-inhibitory-neuron-visual-response-properties
#18
Berquin D Feese, Diego E Pafundo, Meredith N Schmehl, Sandra J Kuhlman
Activity of cortical inhibitory interneurons is rapidly reduced in response to monocular deprivation during the critical period for ocular dominance plasticity and in response to salient events encountered during learning. In the case of primary sensory cortex, a decrease in mean evoked firing rate of parvalbumin-positive (PV) inhibitory neurons is causally linked to a reorganization of excitatory networks following sensory perturbation. Converging evidence indicates that it is deprivation, and not an imbalance between open and closed eye inputs, that triggers rapid plasticity in PV neurons...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118194/optimal-use-of-limb-mechanics-distributes-control-during-bimanual-tasks
#19
David Córdova Bulens, Frédéric Crevecoeur, Jean-Louis Thonnard, Philippe Lefèvre
Bimanual tasks involve the coordination of both arms, which often offers redundancy in the ways a task can be completed. The distribution of control across limbs is often considered from the perspective of handedness. In this context, although there are differences across dominant and non-dominant arms during reaching control (Sainburg 2002), previous studies have shown that the brain tends to favor the dominant arm when performing bimanual tasks (Salimpour and Shadmehr 2014). However, biomechanical factors known to influence planning and control in unimanual tasks may also generate limb asymmetries in force generation, but their influence on bimanual control has remained unexplored...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118193/duration-analysis-using-matching-pursuit-algorithm-reveals-longer-bouts-of-gamma-rhythm
#20
Subhash Chandran Ks, Chandra Sekhar Seelamantula, Supratim Ray
The gamma rhythm (30 to 80 Hz), often associated with high-level cortical functions, is believed to provide a temporal reference frame for spiking activity, for which it should have a stable center frequency and linear phase for an extended duration. However, recent studies that have estimated the power and phase of gamma as a function of time suggest that gamma occurs in short bursts and lacks the temporal structure required to act as a reference frame. Here we show that the bursty appearance of gamma arises from the variability in the spectral estimator used in these studies...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
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