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Journal of Neurophysiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446588/hierarchical-differences-in-population-coding-within-auditory-cortex
#1
Joshua David Downer, Mamiko Niwa, Mitchell L Sutter
Most models of auditory cortical (AC) population coding have focused on primary auditory cortex (A1). Thus, our understanding of how neural coding for sounds progresses along the cortical hierarchy remains obscure. To illuminate this, we recorded from AC fields, A1 and middle-lateral belt (ML) of rhesus macaques. We presented amplitude-modulated (AM) noise during both passive listening and while the animals performed an AM detection task ("Active" condition). In both fields, neurons exhibit monotonic AM-depth tuning, with A1 neurons mostly exhibiting increasing rate-depth functions and ML neurons ~evenly distributed between increasing and decreasing functions...
April 26, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446587/temporal-integration-and-1-f-power-scaling-in-a-circuit-model-of-cerebellar-interneurons
#2
Reinoud Maex, Boris Samuel Gutkin
Inhibitory interneurons interconnected via electrical and chemical (GABAA receptor) synapses form extensive circuits in several brain regions. They are thought to be involved in timing and synchronization through fast feed-forward control of principal neurons. Theoretical studies have shown, however, that whereas self-inhibition does indeed reduce response duration, lateral inhibition, in contrast, may generate slow response components through a process of gradual disinhibition. Here we simulated a circuit of interneurons (stellate and basket cells) of the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex, and observed circuit time-constants that could rise, depending on the parameter values, to more than one second...
April 26, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446586/muscle-synergies-obtained-from-comprehensive-mapping-of-the-primary-motor-cortex-forelimb-representation-using-high-frequency-long-duration-icms
#3
Sommer L Amundsen Huffmaster, Gustaf M Van Acker, Carl W Luchies, Paul D Cheney
Simplifying neuromuscular control for movement has previously been explored by extracting muscle synergies from voluntary movement electromyography (EMG) patterns. The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle synergies represented in EMG recordings associated with direct electrical stimulation of single sites in primary motor cortex (M1). We applied single electrode high-frequency, long-duration intracortical microstimulation (HFLD-ICMS) to the forelimb region of M1 in two rhesus macaques using parameters previously found to produce forelimb movements to stable spatial endpoints (90-150 Hz, 90-150 μA, 1000 ms stimulus train lengths)...
April 26, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446585/activation-mechanism-of-a-neuromodulator-gated-pacemaker-ionic-current
#4
Michael Gray, Daniel Hector Daudelin, Jorge Golowasch
The neuromodulator-gated current (IMI) found in the crab stomatogastric ganglion is activated by neuromodulators that are essential to induce the rhythmic activity of the pyloric network in this system. One of these neuromodulators is also known to control the correlated expression of voltage-gated ionic currents in pyloric neurons as well as synaptic plasticity and strength. Thus, understanding the mechanism by which neuromodulator receptors activate IMI should provide insights not only into how oscillations are initiated, but also into how other processes, and currents not directly activated by them, are regulated...
April 26, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446584/the-human-primary-somatosensory-cortex-is-differentially-involved-in-vibrotaction-and-nociception
#5
Cédric Lenoir, Gan Huang, Yves Vandermeeren, Samar M Hatem, André Mouraux
The role of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in vibrotaction is well established. In contrast, its involvement in nociception remains debated. Here, we test whether S1 is similarly involved in the processing of non-nociceptive and nociceptive somatosensory input in humans by comparing the after-effects of high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) of the primary sensorimotor cortex on the event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by non-nociceptive and nociceptive somatosensory stimuli delivered to the ipsilateral and contralateral hand...
April 26, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446583/a-shared-neural-integrator-for-human-posture-control
#6
Stephanie E Haggerty, Amy R Wu, Kathleen H Sienko, Arthur D Kuo
Control of standing posture requires fusion of multiple inputs including visual, vestibular, somatosensory, and other sensors, each having distinct dynamics. The semicircular canals, for example, have a high-pass filter response to angular velocity, quickly sensing a step change in head rotational velocity followed by a decay. To stabilize gaze despite this decay, the central nervous system supplies a neural "velocity storage" integrator, a filter that extends the angular velocity signal. Similar filtering might contribute temporal dynamics to posture control, as suggested by some state estimation models...
April 26, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446582/auditory-fear-conditioning-modifies-steady-state-evoked-potentials-in-the-rat-inferior-colliculus
#7
André Luiz Vieira Lockmann, Flavio Afonso Gonçalves Mourão, Márcio Flávio Dutra Moraes
The rat inferior colliculus (IC) is a major midbrain relay for ascending inputs from the auditory brainstem and has been suggested to play a key role in the processing of aversive sounds. Previous studies have demonstrated that auditory fear conditioning (AFC) potentiates transient responses to brief tones in the IC, but it remains unexplored whether AFC modifies responses to sustained periodic acoustic stimulation - a type of response called steady-state evoked potential (SSEP). Here we used an amplitude-modulated tone - 10 kHz tone with a sinusoidal amplitude modulation of 53...
April 26, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446581/cl-channel-is-required-for-cxcl10-induced-neuronal-activation-and-itch-response-in-a-murine-model-of-allergic-contact-dermatitis
#8
Lintao Qu, Kai Fu, Steven G Shimada, Robert H LaMotte
Persistent itch often accompanies allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unexplored. We previously demonstrated that CXCL10/ CXCR3 signaling activated a subpopulation of cutaneous primary sensory neurons and mediated itch response after contact hypersensitivity (CHS), a murine model of ACD, induced by squaric acid dibutylester. The purpose of this study was to determine the ionic mechanisms underlying CXCL10-induced neuronal activation and allergic itch. In whole-cell recordings, CXCL10 triggered a current in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons innervating the area of CHS...
April 26, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446580/entrainment-of-visual-steady-state-responses-is-modulated-by-global-spatial-statistics
#9
Thomas Nguyen, Karl Kuntzelman, Vladimir Miskovic
The rhythmic delivery of visual stimuli evokes large-scale neuronal entrainment in the form of steady-state oscillatory field responses. The spatio-temporal properties of stimulus drive appear to constrain the relative degrees of neuronal entrainment. Specific frequency ranges, for example, are uniquely suited for enhancing the strength of stimulus-driven brain oscillations. When it comes to the nature of the visual stimulus itself, studies have used a plethora of inputs ranging from spatially unstructured empty fields to simple contrast patterns (checkerboards, gratings, stripes) and complex arrays (human faces, houses, natural scenes)...
April 26, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446579/modulation-of-long-latency-afferent-inhibition-by-the-amplitude-of-sensory-afferent-volley
#10
Claudia V Turco, Jenin El-Sayes, Hunter J Fassett, Robert Chen, Aimee Jennifer Nelson
Long-latency afferent inhibition (LAI) is the inhibition of the transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) motor-evoked potentials (MEP) by the sensory afferent volley following electrical stimulation of a peripheral nerve. It is unknown how the activation of sensory afferent fibres relates to the magnitude of LAI. This study investigated the relationship between LAI and the sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) from the median nerve (MN) and the digital nerves (DN) of the second digit. LAI was obtained by delivering nerve stimulation 200 ms prior to a TMS pulse delivered over the motor cortex...
April 26, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446578/brain-negativity-as-an-indicator-of-predictive-error-processing-the-contribution-of-visual-action-effect-monitoring
#11
Michael Joch, Mathias Hegele, Heiko Maurer, Hermann Müller, Lisa Katharina Maurer
The error-(related)-negativity (Ne/ERN) is an event-related potential in the electroencephalogram (EEG) correlating with error processing. Its conditions of appearance prior to terminal external error information suggest that the Ne/ERN is indicative of predictive processes in the evaluation of errors. The aim of the present study was to specifically examine the Ne/ERN in a complex motor task and to particularly rule out other explaining sources of the Ne/ERN aside from error prediction processes. To this end, we focused on the dependency of the Ne/ERN on visual monitoring about the action outcome after movement termination but prior to result feedback (action effect monitoring)...
April 26, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424297/magnitude-and-behavior-of-cross-talk-effects-in-multi-channel-electrophysiology-experiments
#12
Matthew John Nelson, Silvana Valtcheva, Laurent Venance
Modern neurophysiological experiments frequently involve multiple channels separated by very small distances. A unique methodological concern for multiple electrode experiments is that of capacitive coupling (cross-talk) between channels. Yet the nature of the cross-talk recording circuit is not well known in the field and the extent to which it practically affects neurophysiology experiments has never been fully investigated. Here we describe a simple electrical circuit model of simultaneous recording and stimulation with two or more channels and experimentally verify the model using ex vivo brain slice and in vivo whole-brain preparations...
April 19, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424296/cell-type-specific-changes-in-retinal-ganglion-cell-function-induced-by-rod-death-and-cone-reorganization-in-rats
#13
Wan-Qing Yu, Norberto M Grzywacz, Eun-Jin Lee, Greg D Field
We have determined the impact of rod death and cone reorganization on the spatiotemporal receptive fields (RFs) and spontaneous activity of distinct RGC types.  We compared RGC function between healthy and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) model rats (S334ter-3) at a time when nearly all rods were lost, but cones remained. This allowed us to determine the impact of rod death on cone-mediated visual signaling -- a relevant time point because the diagnosis of RP frequently occurs when patients are night-blind, but daytime vision persists...
April 19, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424295/the-sensorimotor-system-minimizes-prediction-error-for-object-lifting-when-the-object-s-weight-is-uncertain
#14
Jack Brooks, Anne Thaler
A reliable mechanism to predict the heaviness of an object is important for manipulating an object under environmental uncertainty. Recently, Cashaback et al. (Journal of Neurophysiol 117: 260-274, 2017) showed that for object lifting, the sensorimotor system uses a strategy that minimizes prediction error when the object's weight is uncertain. Previous research demonstrates that visually guided reaching is similarly optimised. Although this suggests a unified strategy of the sensorimotor system for object manipulation, the selected strategy appears to be task dependent and subject to change in response to the degree of environmental uncertainty...
April 19, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424294/gaba-and-primary-motor-cortex-inhibition-in-young-and-older-adults-a-multimodal-reliability-study
#15
Ronan A Mooney, John Cirillo, Winston D Byblow
The effects of healthy ageing on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) within primary motor cortex (M1) remain poorly understood. Studies have reported contrasting results, potentially due to limitations with the common assessment technique. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of healthy ageing on M1 GABA concentration and neurotransmission using a multimodal approach. Fifteen young and 16 older adults participated in this study. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to measure M1 GABA concentration...
April 19, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424293/prediction-suppression-and-surprise-enhancement-in-monkey-inferotemporal-cortex
#16
Suchitra Ramachandran, Travis Meyer, Carl R Olson
Exposing monkeys, over the course of days and weeks, to pairs of images presented in fixed sequence, so that each leading image becomes a predictor for the corresponding trailing image, affects neuronal visual responsiveness in area TE. At the end of the training period, neurons respond relatively weakly to a trailing image when it appears in a trained sequence and thus confirms prediction whereas they respond relatively strongly to the same image when it appears in an untrained sequence and thus violates prediction...
April 19, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424292/loss-and-recovery-of-functional-connectivity-in-cultured-cortical-networks-exposed-to-hypoxia
#17
Joost le Feber, Niels Erkamp, Michel J A M van Putten, Jeannette Hofmeijer
In the core of a brain infarct, loss of neuronal function is followed by neuronal death within minutes. In an area surrounding the core (penumbra), some perfusion remains. Here, neurons initially remain structurally intact, but massive synaptic failure strongly reduces neural activity. Activity in the penumbra may eventually recover or further deteriorate towards massive cell death. Besides activity recovery, return of brain functioning requires restoration of connectivity. However, low activity has been shown to initiate compensatory mechanisms that affect network connectivity...
April 19, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424291/comparison-of-optomotor-and-optokinetic-reflexes-in-mice
#18
Friedrich Kretschmer, Momina Tariq, Walid Chatila, Beverly Wu, Tudor Constantin Badea
During animal locomotion or position adjustments, the visual system uses image stabilization reflexes to compensate for global shifts in the visual scene. These reflexes elicit compensatory head movements (Optomotor response - OMR) in unrestrained animals or compensatory eye movements (Optokinetic response - OKR) in head fixed or unrestrained animals, exposed to globally rotating striped patterns. In mice, OMR responses are relatively easy to observe and find broad use in the rapid evaluation of visual function...
April 19, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28404830/implications-of-plan-based-generalization-in-sensorimotor-adaptation
#19
Samuel David McDougle, Krista M Bond, Jordan A Taylor
Generalization is a fundamental aspect of behavior, allowing for the transfer of knowledge from one context to another. The details of this transfer are thought to reveal how the brain represents what it learns. Generalization has been a central focus in studies of sensorimotor adaptation, and its pattern has been well-characterized: learning of new dynamic and kinematic transformations in one region of space tapers off in a Gaussian-like fashion to neighboring untrained regions, echoing tuned population codes in the brain...
April 12, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28404829/neural-mechanisms-of-oculomotor-abnormalities-in-the-infantile-strabismus-syndrome
#20
Mark M G Walton, Adam C Pallus, Jerome Fleuriet, Michael J Mustari, Kristina Tarczy-Hornoch
Infantile strabismus is characterized by numerous visual and oculomotor abnormalities. Recently non-human primate models of infantile strabismus have been established, with characteristics that closely match those observed in human patients. This has made it possible to study the neural basis for visual and oculomotor symptoms in infantile strabismus. In this review, we consider the available evidence for neural abnormalities in structures related to oculomotor pathways ranging from visual cortex to oculomotor nuclei...
April 12, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
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