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Journal of Cell Biology

Noah Fine, Ioannis D Dimitriou, Jacob Rullo, María José Sandí, Björn Petri, Jack Haitsma, Hisham Ibrahim, Jose La Rose, Michael Glogauer, Paul Kubes, Myron Cybulsky, Robert Rottapel
Leukocyte crawling and transendothelial migration (TEM) are potentiated by shear stress caused by blood flow. The mechanism that couples shear stress to migration has not been fully elucidated. We found that mice lacking GEF-H1 (GEF-H1(-/-)), a RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), displayed limited migration and recruitment of neutrophils into inflamed tissues. GEF-H1(-/-) leukocytes were deficient in in vivo crawling and TEM in the postcapillary venules. We demonstrated that although GEF-H1 deficiency had little impact on the migratory properties of neutrophils under static conditions, shear stress triggered GEF-H1-dependent spreading and crawling of neutrophils and relocalization of GEF-H1 to flotillin-2-rich uropods...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Amandine Chaix, Amir Zarrinpar, Satchidananda Panda
Circadian clocks are cell-autonomous timing mechanisms that organize cell functions in a 24-h periodicity. In mammals, the main circadian oscillator consists of transcription-translation feedback loops composed of transcriptional regulators, enzymes, and scaffolds that generate and sustain daily oscillations of their own transcript and protein levels. The clock components and their targets impart rhythmic functions to many gene products through transcriptional, posttranscriptional, translational, and posttranslational mechanisms...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Philipp Niethammer
Forces deriving from blood flow shear modulate vascular adherence and transendothelial migration of leukocytes into inflamed tissues, but the mechanisms by which shear is sensed are unclear. In this issue, Fine et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. identify the guanosine nucleotide exchange factor GEF-H1 as critical for shear stress-induced transendothelial neutrophil migration.
October 10, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Kimberly Siletti
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 10, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Alexander P Nesmith, Matthew A Wagner, Francesco S Pasqualini, Blakely B O'Connor, Mark J Pincus, Paul R August, Kevin Kit Parker
Tongue weakness, like all weakness in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), occurs as a result of contraction-induced muscle damage and deficient muscular repair. Although membrane fragility is known to potentiate injury in DMD, whether muscle stem cells are implicated in deficient muscular repair remains unclear. We hypothesized that DMD myoblasts are less sensitive to cues in the extracellular matrix designed to potentiate structure-function relationships of healthy muscle. To test this hypothesis, we drew inspiration from the tongue and engineered contractile human muscle tissues on thin films...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
David Albrecht, Christian M Winterflood, Mohsen Sadeghi, Thomas Tschager, Frank Noé, Helge Ewers
The axon initial segment (AIS) is enriched in specific adaptor, cytoskeletal, and transmembrane molecules. During AIS establishment, a membrane diffusion barrier is formed between the axonal and somatodendritic domains. Recently, an axonal periodic pattern of actin, spectrin, and ankyrin forming 190-nm-spaced, ring-like structures has been discovered. However, whether this structure is related to the diffusion barrier function is unclear. Here, we performed single-particle tracking time-course experiments on hippocampal neurons during AIS development...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Jan Lammerding, Katarina Wolf
Cells exhibit transient nuclear envelope ruptures during interphase, but the responsible biophysical processes remain unclear. In this issue, Hatch and Hetzer (2016. J. Cell Biol. show that actin fibers constrict the nucleus, causing chromatin protrusions and nuclear membrane ruptures at sites with nuclear lamina defects.
October 10, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Masataka Kunii, Mica Ohara-Imaizumi, Noriko Takahashi, Masaki Kobayashi, Ryosuke Kawakami, Yasumitsu Kondoh, Takeshi Shimizu, Siro Simizu, Bangzhong Lin, Kazuto Nunomura, Kyota Aoyagi, Mitsuyo Ohno, Masaki Ohmuraya, Takashi Sato, Shin-Ichiro Yoshimura, Ken Sato, Reiko Harada, Yoon-Jeong Kim, Hiroyuki Osada, Tomomi Nemoto, Haruo Kasai, Tadahiro Kitamura, Shinya Nagamatsu, Akihiro Harada
The membrane fusion of secretory granules with plasma membranes is crucial for the exocytosis of hormones and enzymes. Secretion disorders can cause various diseases such as diabetes or pancreatitis. Synaptosomal-associated protein 23 (SNAP23), a soluble N-ethyl-maleimide sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor (SNARE) molecule, is essential for secretory granule fusion in several cell lines. However, the in vivo functions of SNAP23 in endocrine and exocrine tissues remain unclear. In this study, we show opposing roles for SNAP23 in secretion in pancreatic exocrine and endocrine cells...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Benjamin L Timney, Barak Raveh, Roxana Mironska, Jill M Trivedi, Seung Joong Kim, Daniel Russel, Susan R Wente, Andrej Sali, Michael P Rout
Passive macromolecular diffusion through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) is thought to decrease dramatically beyond a 30-60-kD size threshold. Using thousands of independent time-resolved fluorescence microscopy measurements in vivo, we show that the NPC lacks such a firm size threshold; instead, it forms a soft barrier to passive diffusion that intensifies gradually with increasing molecular mass in both the wild-type and mutant strains with various subsets of phenylalanine-glycine (FG) domains and different levels of baseline passive permeability...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Keiji Uematsu, Fumihiko Okumura, Syunsuke Tonogai, Akiko Joo-Okumura, Dawit Hailu Alemayehu, Akihiko Nishikimi, Yoshinori Fukui, Kunio Nakatsukasa, Takumi Kamura
Proper dynamic regulation of the spindle is essential for successful cell division. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate spindle dynamics in mitosis are not fully understood. In this study, we show that Cullin 5-interacting suppressor of cytokine signaling box protein ASB7 ubiquitinates DDA3, a regulator of spindle dynamics, thereby targeting it for proteasomal degradation. The presence of microtubules (MTs) prevented the ASB7-DDA3 interaction, thus stabilizing DDA3. Knockdown of ASB7 decreased MT polymerization and increased the proportion of cells with unaligned chromosomes, and this phenotype was rescued by deletion of DDA3...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Patrick M Redli, Ivana Gasic, Patrick Meraldi, Erich A Nigg, Anna Santamaria
Chromosome biorientation and accurate segregation rely on the plasticity of kinetochore-microtubule (KT-MT) attachments. Aurora B facilitates KT-MT dynamics by phosphorylating kinetochore proteins that are critical for KT-MT interactions. Among the substrates whose microtubule and kinetochore binding is curtailed by Aurora B is the spindle and kinetochore-associated (Ska) complex, a key factor for KT-MT stability. Here, we show that Ska is not only a substrate of Aurora B, but is also required for Aurora B activity...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Emily M Hatch, Martin W Hetzer
Repeated rounds of nuclear envelope (NE) rupture and repair have been observed in laminopathy and cancer cells and result in intermittent loss of nucleus compartmentalization. Currently, the causes of NE rupture are unclear. Here, we show that NE rupture in cancer cells relies on the assembly of contractile actin bundles that interact with the nucleus via the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. We found that the loss of actin bundles or the LINC complex did not rescue nuclear lamina defects, a previously identified determinant of nuclear membrane stability, but did decrease the number and size of chromatin hernias...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Yu-Mei Huang, Matthew N Rasband
What prevents the movement of membrane molecules between axonal and somatodendritic domains is unclear. In this issue, Albrecht et. al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. demonstrate via high-speed single-particle tracking and superresolution microscopy that lipid-anchored molecules in the axon initial segment are confined to membrane domains separated by periodically spaced actin rings.
October 10, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Claudio A Franco, Holger Gerhardt
Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and blood flow regulate vascular remodeling and homeostasis. In this issue, Baeyens et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol show that blood flow sensitizes endothelial cells to BMP9 signaling by triggering Alk1/ENG complexing to suppress cell proliferation and to recruit mural cells, thereby establishing endothelial quiescence.
September 26, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Shawn Jordan
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 26, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Nicolas Baeyens, Bruno Larrivée, Roxana Ola, Brielle Hayward-Piatkowskyi, Alexandre Dubrac, Billy Huang, Tyler D Ross, Brian G Coon, Elizabeth Min, Maya Tsarfati, Haibin Tong, Anne Eichmann, Martin A Schwartz
Morphogenesis of the vascular system is strongly modulated by mechanical forces from blood flow. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an inherited autosomal-dominant disease in which arteriovenous malformations and telangiectasias accumulate with age. Most cases are linked to heterozygous mutations in Alk1 or Endoglin, receptors for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) 9 and 10. Evidence suggests that a second hit results in clonal expansion of endothelial cells to form lesions with poor mural cell coverage that spontaneously rupture and bleed...
September 26, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Ravikiran Kasula, Ye Jin Chai, Adekunle T Bademosi, Callista B Harper, Rachel S Gormal, Isabel C Morrow, Eric Hosy, Brett M Collins, Daniel Choquet, Andreas Papadopulos, Frédéric A Meunier
Munc18-1 and syntaxin-1A control SNARE-dependent neuroexocytosis and are organized in nanodomains on the plasma membrane of neurons and neurosecretory cells. Deciphering the intra- and intermolecular steps via which they prepare secretory vesicles (SVs) for fusion is key to understanding neuronal and hormonal communication. Here, we demonstrate that expression of a priming-deficient mutant lacking 17 residues of the domain 3a hinge-loop (Munc18-1(Δ317-333)) in PC12 cells engineered to knockdown Munc18-1/2 markedly prolonged SV docking...
September 26, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Anupam Das, Sagarika Nag, Anne B Mason, Margarida M Barroso
Transient "kiss and run" interactions between endosomes containing iron-bound transferrin (Tf) and mitochondria have been shown to facilitate direct iron transfer in erythroid cells. In this study, we used superresolution three-dimensional (3D) direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy to show that Tf-containing endosomes directly interact with mitochondria in epithelial cells. We used live-cell time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, followed by 3D rendering, object tracking, and a distance transformation algorithm, to track Tf-endosomes and characterize the dynamics of their interactions with mitochondria...
September 26, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Jason A West, Mari Mito, Satoshi Kurosaka, Toru Takumi, Chiharu Tanegashima, Takeshi Chujo, Kaori Yanaka, Robert E Kingston, Tetsuro Hirose, Charles Bond, Archa Fox, Shinichi Nakagawa
Paraspeckles are nuclear bodies built on the long noncoding RNA Neat1, which regulates a variety of physiological processes including cancer progression and corpus luteum formation. To obtain further insight into the molecular basis of the function of paraspeckles, we performed fine structural analyses of these nuclear bodies using structural illumination microscopy. Notably, paraspeckle proteins are found within different layers along the radially arranged bundles of Neat1 transcripts, forming a characteristic core-shell spheroidal structure...
September 26, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
Jennifer Vieillard, Marie Paschaki, Jean-Luc Duteyrat, Céline Augière, Elisabeth Cortier, Jean-André Lapart, Joëlle Thomas, Bénédicte Durand
The ciliary transition zone (TZ) is a complex structure found at the cilia base. Defects in TZ assembly are associated with human ciliopathies. In most eukaryotes, three protein complexes (CEP290, NPHP, and MKS) cooperate to build the TZ. We show that in Drosophila melanogaster, mild TZ defects are observed in the absence of MKS components. In contrast, Cby and Azi1 cooperate to build the TZ by acting upstream of Cep290 and MKS components. Without Cby and Azi1, centrioles fail to form the TZ, precluding sensory cilia assembly, and no ciliary membrane cap associated with sperm ciliogenesis is made...
September 26, 2016: Journal of Cell Biology
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