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British Journal of Sociology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28328093/race-in-an-epigenetic-time-thinking-biology-in-the-plural
#1
Maurizio Meloni
The notion that biological memories of environmental experiences can be embedded in the human genome and even transmitted transgenerationally is increasingly relevant in the postgenomic world, particularly in molecular epigenetics, where the genome is conceptualized as porous to environmental signals. In this article I discuss the current rethinking of race in epigenetic rather than genetic terms, emphasizing some of its paradoxical implications, especially for public policy. I claim in particular that: (i) if sociologists want to investigate race in a postgenomic world they should pay more attention to this novel plastic and biosocial view of race; and (ii) there are no reasons to believe that an epigenetic view will extinguish race, or that soft-inheritance claims will produce a less exclusionary discourse than genetics (hard heredity)...
March 22, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28328080/crowding-in-how-indian-civil-society-organizations-began-mobilizing-around-climate-change
#2
Tuomas Ylä-Anttila, Pradip Swarnakar
This paper argues that periodic waves of crowding-in to 'hot' issue fields are a recurring feature of how globally networked civil society organizations operate, especially in countries of the Global South. We elaborate on this argument through a study of Indian civil society mobilization around climate change. Five key mechanisms contribute to crowding-in processes: (1) the expansion of discursive opportunities; (2) the event effects of global climate change conferences; (3) the network effects created by expanding global civil society networks; (4) the adoption and innovation of action repertoires; and (5) global pressure effects creating new opportunities for civil society...
March 22, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28230892/w-e-b-du-bois-at-the-center-from-science-civil-rights-movement-to-black-lives-matter
#3
Aldon Morris
I am honoured to present the 2016 British Journal of Sociology Annual Lecture at the London School of Economics. My lecture is based on ideas derived from my new book, The Scholar Denied: W.E.B. Du Bois and the Birth of Modern Sociology. In this essay I make three arguments. First, W.E.B. Du Bois and his Atlanta School of Sociology pioneered scientific sociology in the United States. Second, Du Bois pioneered a public sociology that creatively combined sociology and activism. Finally, Du Bois pioneered a politically engaged social science relevant for contemporary political struggles including the contemporary Black Lives Matter movement...
February 23, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28181682/social-closure-micro-class-immobility-and-the-intergenerational-reproduction-of-the-upper-class-a-comparative-study
#4
Lucia Ruggera, Carlo Barone
This article assesses how processes of social closure enhance intergenerational immobility in the regulated professions and thus promote persistence at the top of the occupational hierarchy. We compare four European countries (GB, Germany, Denmark and Sweden) that differ considerably in their degree of professional regulation and in their broader institutional arrangements. We run log-linear and logistic regression models on a cumulative dataset based on three large-scale surveys with detailed and highly comparable information at the level of unit occupations...
February 9, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28321859/the-quest-to-overcome-irrelevance-in-a-troubled-world-can-du-boisian-analyses-rescue-sociology
#5
Aldon Morris
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28321858/-let-the-ears-of-the-guilty-people-tingle-with-truth-w-e-b-du-bois-as-an-original-sociologist
#6
Les Back
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28321857/academic-apartheid-and-the-poverty-of-theory-the-impact-of-scholarly-segregation-on-the-development-of-sociology-in-the-united-states
#7
Michael Schwartz
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28321856/automation-is-it-really-different-this-time
#8
REVIEW
Judy Wajcman
This review examines several recent books that deal with the impact of automation and robotics on the future of jobs. Most books in this genre predict that the current phase of digital technology will create massive job loss in an unprecedented way, that is, that this wave of automation is different from previous waves. Uniquely digital technology is said to automate professional occupations for the first time. This review critically examines these claims, puncturing some of the hyperbole about automation, robotics and Artificial Intelligence...
March 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28321855/redemption-story-was-w-e-b-du-bois-a-founder-of-modern-sociology
#9
Walter R Allen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28321854/w-e-b-du-bois-and-robert-park
#10
Martin Bulmer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28321853/the-road-not-taken-the-fate-of-w-e-b-du-bois-s-science-of-society
#11
Michael Seltzer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27859004/eating-together-and-eating-alone-meal-arrangements-in-british-households
#12
Luke Yates, Alan Warde
Sociology traditionally accounts for eating in terms of the social organization of meals, their provision and consumption. A recurrent public concern is that the meal is being subverted. This paper examines meal arrangements in British households in 2012, drawing on an online survey in the format of a food diary administered to 2784 members of a supermarket consumer panel. It charts the organization of contemporary eating occasions, paying attention to socio-demographic variation in practice. Especially, it explores companionless meals, putting them in contexts of food provisioning and temporal rhythms...
March 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27643960/constructions-reconstructions-and-deconstructions-of-family-amongst-people-who-live-apart-together-lats
#13
Mariya Stoilova, Sasha Roseneil, Julia Carter, Simon Duncan, Miranda Phillips
This article explores how people who live apart from their partners in Britain describe and understand 'family'. It investigates whether, and how far, non-cohabiting partners, friends, 'blood' and legal ties are seen as 'family', and how practices of care and support, and feelings of closeness are related to these constructions. It suggests that people in LAT relationships creatively draw and re-draw the boundaries of family belonging in ways that involve emotionally subjective understandings of family life, and that also refer to normative constructions of what 'family' ought to be, as well as to practical recognitions of lived family 'realities'...
March 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27905103/subjective-well-being-in-the-new-china-religion-social-capital-and-social-status
#14
Yunsong Chen, Mark Williams
We present the first nationally representative evidence on the relationship between religion and subjective well-being for the case of China. Research on Western societies tends to find a positive association between being religious and level of well-being. China provides an interesting critical case as the religious population is growing rapidly and the religious and socioeconomic environments are profoundly different from Western societies, implying different mechanisms might be at work. We hypothesize to find a positive association between religion and well-being in China too, but argue social capital, for which strong evidence is often found in Western societies, is unlikely to be an important mechanism because religion in China is generally non-congregational...
December 2016: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27753077/do-organizational-and-political-legal-arrangements-explain-financial-wrongdoing
#15
Harland Prechel, Lu Zheng
The 2008 financial crisis was a systemic problem with deep-rooted structural causes that created opportunities to engage in financial malfeasance, a form of corporate wrongdoing. However, few quantitative studies exist on the effects of organizational and political-legal arrangements on financial malfeasance. In this paper, we examine the effects of organizational and political-legal arrangements that emerged in the 1990s in the FIRE sector (i.e., financial, insurance, and real estate) on financial malfeasance...
December 2016: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27716905/the-sociology-of-late-secularization-social-divisions-and-religiosity
#16
Steve Bruce
At the start of the twentieth century the religious differed from the religiously indifferent largely in being religious. Now they differ in a number of other social and demographic characteristics that reduce interaction between the two populations further than simple numbers would require. That some of the main carriers of religion are immigrants or adherents of recently imported faiths reinforces the sense that religion is what other people do. In the context of the stock of religious knowledge being depleted and religion-taken-too-seriously being unpopular, the narrow demographic base of the religious makes conversion unlikely and thus makes the reversal of secularization unlikely...
December 2016: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27682473/intergenerational-solidarity-the-paradox-of-reciprocity-imbalance-in-ageing-welfare-states
#17
Peter Thijssen
In this article a new theoretical framework is applied to a research field that is somewhat fragmented, namely that of intergenerational solidarity in ageing welfare states. Inspired by utilitarian considerations many scholars tend to problematize the lack of reciprocity characterizing intergenerational exchanges. As some generations are longer old and more numerous they may receive excessive state-administered support of the younger generations, especially in a democratic setting. However, in reality there is limited empirical evidence of intergenerational conflict and theoretical explanations of this paradox are rare...
December 2016: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27643817/student-involvement-in-the-uk-sex-industry-motivations-and-experiences
#18
Tracey Sagar, Debbie Jones, Katrien Symons, Jacky Tyrie, Ron Roberts
The Student Sex Work Project was set up in 2012 in the United Kingdom (UK) to locate students who are involved in the sex industry, to discover their motivations and needs, and in doing so provide an evidence base to consider the development of policy and practice within Higher Education. As part of this initiative, a large survey was undertaken comprising students from throughout the UK. Reporting on the findings from this survey, the article sheds some light on what occupations students take up in the sex industry, what motivates their participation and how they experience the work...
December 2016: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27626619/the-disorganized-family-institutions-practices-and-normativity
#19
Lisa Smyth
This paper considers the value of a normative account of the relationship between agents and institutions for contemporary efforts to explain ever more complex and disorganized forms of social life. The character of social institutions, as they relate to practices, agents and norms, is explored through an engagement with the common claim that family life has been de-institutionalized. The paper argues that a normative rather than empirical definition of institutions avoids a false distinction between institutions and practices...
December 2016: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27501531/the-remaining-core-a-fresh-look-at-religiosity-trends-in-great-britain
#20
Sarah Wilkins-Laflamme
In recent years, there has been a growing argument that the end product of secularization may not be a disappearance of all things religious, but rather a polarization between a larger secular group in society and smaller religiously fervent and active communities. Yet, there has been little empirical testing of this theory in contexts of advanced secularization. The aim of this paper is to fill this gap by studying individual belief and religiosity trends over the past four decades in Great Britain, searching specifically for evidence of the population splitting more and more between religious 'nones' removed from all forms of religion, and actively religious individuals characterized by strong beliefs and favourable to the public involvement of religion...
December 2016: British Journal of Sociology
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