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British Journal of Sociology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28986981/the-new-subversive-geranium-some-notes-on-the-management-of-additional-troubles-in-maximum-security-prisons
#1
Alison Liebling, Ryan J Williams
In this paper, we revisit King and McDermott's 1990 article on the social construction of 'control problem' prisoners and their management in high security prisons, in the light of our recent research on the location and building of trust in contemporary high security prisons. We examine how religious and race identities are now deeply implicated in the construction of risk, and we describe the procedures for and some of the consequences of managing the new risks of radicalization and extremist violence in prison...
October 7, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28986977/the-class-pictures-in-citizens-minds
#2
Joshua Robison, Rune Stubager
Social class has traditionally played a key role in explaining social behaviour and cognition. However, recent analyses have been dominated by the view that the relevance of class for behaviour has dwindled in advanced industrial societies. We contest this view by focusing on the subjective components of class consciousness. Using a national survey of Danish citizens, we show that individuals continue to hold meaningful conceptions of classes, to identify with them and, moreover, to perceive substantial levels of differences between them with these latter beliefs being strongly structured by respondent class identification...
October 7, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28972272/the-path-from-social-origins-to-top-jobs-social-reproduction-via-education
#3
Alice Sullivan, Samantha Parsons, Francis Green, Richard D Wiggins, George Ploubidis
This paper provides a comprehensive account of the way in which cognitive and educational attainment mediate the link between social origins and elite social class destinations in mid-life. Using the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70), we assess the roles of a range of pathways through which educational advantage may lead to occupational attainment: cognitive development; private and selective secondary schools; school level qualifications; and higher education, including institution and field of study. Whereas past research has shown a residual direct effect of social origins on class destinations, we find that, once a sufficiently detailed picture of educational attainment is taken into account, education fully explains the link between social origins and top social class destinations...
October 3, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922583/reluctant-entrepreneurs-musicians-and-entrepreneurship-in-the-new-music-industry
#4
Jo Haynes, Lee Marshall
Changing labour conditions in the creative industries - with celebrations of autonomy and entrepreneurialism intertwined with increasing job insecurity, portfolio careers and short-term, project-based contracts - are often interpreted as heralding changes to employment relations more broadly. The position of musicians' labour in relation to these changes is unclear, however, given that these kinds of conditions have defined musicians' working practices over much longer periods of time (though they may have intensified due to well-documented changes to the music industry brought about by digitization and disintermediation)...
September 18, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922463/declining-social-mobility-evidence-from-five-linked-censuses-in-england-and-wales-1971-2011
#5
Franz Buscha, Patrick Sturgis
In this paper we add to the existing evidence base on recent trends in inter-generational social mobility in England and Wales. We analyse data from the Office for National Statistics Longitudinal Study (ONS-LS), which links individual records from the five decennial censuses between 1971 and 2011. The ONS-LS is an excellent data resource for the study of social mobility because it has a very large sample size, excellent population coverage and low rates of nonresponse and attrition across waves. Additionally, the structure of the study means that we can observe the occupations of LS-members' parents when they were children and follow their own progress in the labour market at regular intervals into middle age...
September 18, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28914963/class-categories-and-the-subjective-dimension-of-class-the-case-of-denmark
#6
Gitte Sommer Harrits, Helene Helboe Pedersen
Class relations have been proven to affect various aspects of social life, even in modern individualized societies. However, following claims on individualization and the so-called 'death of class' thesis, studying the subjective dimension of class - that is, the way individuals perceive of class relations and their own position within them - has gone out of style. We argue that even in equalized societies, subjective class perceptions may still influence attitudes and behaviour as they evolve to fit modern class relations...
September 15, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28906547/reflexive-convention-civil-partnership-marriage-and-family
#7
Brian Heaphy
Drawing on an analysis of qualitative interview data from a study of formalized same-sex relationships (civil partnerships) this paper examines the enduring significance of marriage and family as social institutions. In doing so, it intervenes in current debates in the sociology of family and personal life about how such institutions are undermined by reflexivity or bolstered by convention. Against the backdrop of dominating sociological frames for understanding the links between the changing nature of marriage and family and same-sex relationship recognition, the paper analyses the diverse and overlapping ways (including the simple, relational, strategic, ambivalent and critical ways) in which same-sex partners reflexively constructed and engaged with marriage and family conventions...
September 14, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28895131/social-mobility-and-the-well-being-of-individuals
#8
Tak Wing Chan
Several papers published in recent years have revived interest in Sorokin's dissociative thesis: the view that intergenerational social mobility has detrimental effects on the social relationships and wellbeing of individuals. In this paper, I test the dissociative thesis using data from the British Household Panel Survey and Understanding Society. On a wide range of indicators that measure participation in civic associations, contact with parents, close personal relationships, social support, subjective wellbeing, etc...
September 12, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28895128/transitional-justice-as-social-control-political-transitions-human-rights-norms-and-the-reclassification-of-the-past
#9
Ron Dudai
This article offers an interpretation of transitional justice policies - the efforts of post-conflict and post-dictatorship societies to address the legacy of past abuses - as a form of social control. While transitional justice is commonly conceptualized as responding to a core problem of impunity, this article argues that such formulation is too narrow and leads to lack of coherence in the analysis of the diverse array of transitional mechanisms, which include among others trials, truth commissions, reparations for victims and apologies...
September 12, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28880376/-luck-chance-and-happenstance-perceptions-of-success-and-failure-amongst-fixed-term-academic-staff-in-uk-higher-education
#10
Vik Loveday
What does it mean to attribute success to 'luck', but failure to personal deficiency? In 2015/16, more than 34 per cent of academic employees in UK higher education institutions were employed on temporary contracts, and the sector itself has undergone a substantial transformation in recent years in terms of expansion, measurement, and marketization. Based on two waves of interviews conducted with fixed-term academic employees at different career stages, the article explores the narrativization of success and failure amongst staff working at the 'sharp end' of the so-called neoliberal academy...
September 7, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28880372/the-making-of-a-moral-economy-women-s-views-of-monetary-transactions-in-an-egg-sharing-for-research-scheme
#11
Erica Haimes, Robin Williams
There are growing debates about the appropriateness of offering money in exchange for the provision of bodily materials for clinical treatment and research. The bioethics literature and many practice guidelines have generally been opposed to such entanglement, depicting the use of money as contaminating, creating undue inducement, exploitation and commodification of the human body. However, two elements have been missing from these debates: (i) the perspectives of those people providing bodily materials when money is offered; and (ii) systematic empirical engagement with the notion of 'money' itself...
September 7, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28880371/cultures-of-choice-towards-a-sociology-of-choice-as-a-cultural-phenomenon
#12
Ori Schwarz
The article explores different ways to conceptualize the relationship between choice and culture. These two notions are often constructed as opposites: while sociologies of modernization (such as Giddens') portray a shift from cultural traditions to culturally disembedded choice, dispositional sociologies (such as Bourdieu's) uncover cultural determination as the hidden truth behind apparent choice. However, choice may be real and cultural simultaneously. Culture moulds choice not only by inculcating dispositions or shaping repertoires of alternatives, but also by offering culturally specific choice practices, ways of choosing embedded in meaning, normativity, and materiality; and by shaping attributions of choice in everyday life...
September 7, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28876450/what-has-become-of-critique-reassembling-sociology-after-latour
#13
Tom Mills
This paper offers a defence of sociology through an engagement with Actor Network Theory (ANT) and particularly the critique of 'critical' and politically engaged social science developed by Bruno Latour. It argues that ANT identifies some weaknesses in more conventional sociology and social theory, and suggests that 'critical' and 'public' orientated sociologists can learn from the analytical precision and ethnographic sensibilities that characterize ANT as a framework of analysis and a research programme...
September 6, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28869293/living-in-the-city-school-friendships-diversity-and-the-middle-classes
#14
Carol Vincent, Sarah Neal, Humera Iqbal
Much of the literature on the urban middle classes describes processes of both affiliation (often to the localities) and disaffiliation (often from some of the non-middle-class residents). In this paper, we consider this situation from a different position, drawing on research exploring whether and how children and adults living in diverse localities develop friendships with those different to themselves in terms of social class and ethnicity. This paper focuses on the interviews with the ethnically diverse, but predominantly white British, middle-class parent participants, considering their attitudes towards social and cultural difference...
September 4, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28856674/institutional-change-and-parental-compensation-in-intergenerational-attainment
#15
Heta Pöyliö, Jani Erola, Elina Kilpi-Jakonen
Previous research has shown how institutional changes, such as educational expansion, have weakened parental influence on educational attainment. We extend this analysis to occupational attainment and put forth a parental compensation hypothesis: as the origin-education (OE) association weakens, parents act to compensate for this in order to maintain their influence on the child's occupational attainment. We should see this as a strengthened origin-destination association net of education (net OD). Further, we study whether these compensatory actions are triggered by changes in educational institutions and whether the institutional changes that reduce educational inequality are the same ones that prompt parental compensation...
August 30, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28856673/small-p-politics-how-pleasurable-convivial-and-pragmatic-political-ideals-influence-engagement-in%C3%A2-eat-local-initiatives
#16
Emily Huddart Kennedy, Josée Johnston, John R Parkins
Non-confrontational engagement practices like ethical consumption are a popular form of everyday politics. Existing research into these practices offers positive evaluations (highlighting the value of everyday engagement in public life) and critical perspectives (questioning whether myriad small acts can address structural barriers to equity and sustainability). Meanwhile, less emphasis has been placed on understanding the underlying ideals and motivations for political action that seeks to avoid traditional politics...
August 30, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28856669/postmaterialism-and-young-people-s-political-participation-in-a-time-of-austerity
#17
Matt Henn, Ben Oldfield, James Hart
Recent trends suggest that young people in Britain are refraining from engaging in formal political processes. At the same time, they are increasingly expressing support for, and turning toward, a new and diverse range of non-institutionalized forms of political action in order to actualize their interests. Using Inglehart's ideas on postmaterialism, we consider whether this apparent rejection of mainstream politics in favour of less conventional - and sometimes radical - forms of political action is changing over time in Britain, reflecting fluctuating economic conditions witnessed over the last two decades...
August 30, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28833044/back-to-hegel-on-gillian-rose-s-critique-of-sociological-reason
#18
Brian W Fuller
Thirty-five years ago, Gillian Rose articulated a significant critique of classical sociological reason, emphasizing its relationship to its philosophical forebears. In a series of works, but most significantly in her Hegel contra Sociology, Rose worked to specify the implications of sociology's failure, both in its critical Marxist and its 'scientific' forms, to move beyond Kant and to fully come to terms with the thought of Hegel. In this article, I unpack and explain the substance of her criticisms, developing the necessary Hegelian philosophical background on which she founded them...
August 22, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28832968/motives-of-corporate-political-donations-industry-regulation-subjective-judgement-and-the-origins-of-pragmatic-and-ideological-corporations
#19
Nicholas M Harrigan
What motivates corporate political action? Are corporations motivated by their own narrow economic self-interest; are they committed to pursuing larger class interests; or are corporations instruments for status groups to pursue their own agendas? Sociologists have been divided over this question for much of the last century. This paper introduces a novel case - that of Australia - and an extensive dataset of over 1,500 corporations and 7,500 directors. The paper attempts to understand the motives of corporate political action by examining patterns of corporate political donations...
August 21, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28817189/from-preparedness-to-risk-from-the-singular-risk-of-nuclear-war-to-the-plurality-of-all-hazards
#20
Joe Deville, Michael Guggenheim
Debates on risk have largely assumed risk to be the outcome of calculative practices. There is a related assumption that risk objects come only in one form, and that the reason not everything can be transformed into a risk is because of the difficulties in calculating and creating universal quantitative comparisons. In this article, building on recent studies of preparedness that have broadened understandings of risk, we provide an analysis of how preparedness measures might themselves produce risk, in particular through risk's durable instantiation, or what we call 'concretization'...
August 17, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
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