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Child Development

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28548711/sequential-associations-between-caregiver-talk-and-child-play-in-autism-spectrum-disorder-and-typical-development
#1
Kristen Bottema-Beutel, Caitlin Malloy, Blair P Lloyd, Rebecca Louick, Linnea Joffe-Nelson, Linda R Watson, Paul J Yoder
This study examined sequential associations between child play and caregiver talk in 98 caregiver-child dyads (Mmental age  = 14 months). Fifty dyads included a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Analyses revealed sequential associations between child play and caregiver follow-in (FI) utterances (utterances related to the child's attentional focus) were stronger in the ASD as compared to the typically developing (TD) group. FI utterances were more likely to elicit functional play than caregiver-focused utterances, and more so in the ASD group...
May 26, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28548307/developmental-cascade-and-transactional-associations-among-biological-and-behavioral-indicators-of-temperament-and-maternal-behavior
#2
Nicole B Perry, Jessica M Dollar, Susan D Calkins, Martha Ann Bell
An empirical model of temperament that assessed transactional and cascade associations between respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), negative affectivity, and the caregiving environment (i.e., maternal intrusiveness) across three time points during infancy (N = 388) was examined. Negative affectivity at 5 months was associated positively with maternal intrusiveness at 10 months, which in turn predicted increased negative affectivity at 24 months. RSA at 5 months was associated positively with negative affectivity at 10 months, which subsequently predicted greater RSA at 24 months...
May 26, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542847/-american%C3%A2-%C3%A2-english-speaker-before-american%C3%A2-%C3%A2-white-the-development-of-children-s-reasoning-about-nationality
#3
Jasmine M DeJesus, Hyesung G Hwang, Jocelyn B Dautel, Katherine D Kinzler
Adults implicitly judge people from certain social backgrounds as more "American" than others. This study tests the development of children's reasoning about nationality and social categories. Children across cultures (White and Korean American children in the United States, Korean children in South Korea) judged the nationality of individuals varying in race and language. Across cultures, 5- to 6-year-old children (N = 100) categorized English speakers as "American" and Korean speakers as "Korean" regardless of race, suggesting that young children prioritize language over race when thinking about nationality...
May 24, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542794/positive-affectivity-and-fear-trajectories-in-infancy-contributions-of-mother-child-interaction-factors
#4
Maria A Gartstein, Gregory R Hancock, Sydney L Iverson
Fear and positive emotionality were considered in a growth modeling context. Mothers, primarily Caucasian (91.9%) and of middle socioeconomic status, participated in play interactions with infants at 4 months (N = 148). Infant fear and positive affectivity were evaluated at 6, 8, 10, and 12 months of age. A linear trajectory was superior in explaining growth for parent report and observation-based indicators of positive affectivity and parent report of fearfulness; a piecewise model explained the nonlinear growth of observation-based fear...
May 24, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542838/order-matters-children-s-evaluation-of-underinformative-teachers-depends-on-context
#5
Hyowon Gweon, Mika Asaba
The ability to evaluate "sins of omission"-true but pragmatically misleading, underinformative pedagogy-is critical for learning. This study reveals a developmental change in children's evaluation of underinformative teachers and investigates the nature of their limitations. Participants rated a fully informative teacher and an underinformative teacher in two different orders. Six- and 7-year-olds (N = 28) successfully distinguished the teachers regardless of the order (Experiment 1), whereas 4- and 5-year-olds (N = 82) succeeded only when the fully informative teacher came first (Experiments 2 and 3)...
May 22, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28523738/using-a-group-centered-approach-to-observe-interactions-in-early-childhood-education
#6
Saskia D M van Schaik, Paul P M Leseman, Mariëtte de Haan
This study examined the value of using a group-centered approach to evaluate process quality of early childhood education and care (ECEC). Is observed support of group processes a different aspect of classroom quality, and does it predict children's collaborative play in ECEC in the Netherlands? In two play situations, 37 teachers and 120 two- to four-year-old children were observed with the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) Toddler and two new measures. In a two-level structural equation model, teachers' support of group processes was positively related to the CLASS domains and to children's collaborative play, over and above the effect of children's cognitive ability and social competence...
May 19, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28523643/cyberbullying-and-cybervictimization-within-a-cross-cultural-context-a%C3%A2-study-of-canadian-and-tanzanian-adolescents
#7
Jennifer D Shapka, Hezron Z Onditi, Rebecca J Collie, Noam Lapidot-Lefler
This study explored cyberbullying and cybervictimization (CBCV), for adolescents aged 11-15 from Tanzania (N = 426) and Canada (N = 592). Measurement invariance and model invariance was found for CBCV. In addition, multigroup structural equation modeling was used to explore several variables: age, gender, average hours online each day, accessing the Internet in a private location, having online privacy concerns, going online for social purposes, and motivation for cyberbullying. Results found interesting patterns within each country...
May 19, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28510324/mutual-gaze-during-early-mother-infant-interactions-promotes-attention-control-development
#8
Alicja Niedźwiecka, Sonia Ramotowska, Przemysław Tomalski
Efficient attention control is fundamental for infant cognitive development, but its early precursors are not well understood. This study investigated whether dyadic visual attention during parent-infant interactions at 5 months of age predicts the ability to control attention at 11 months of age (N = 55). Total duration of mutual gaze (MG) was assessed during free play at 5 months, while infant attention control was measured in a gap-and-overlap task at 5 and 11 months. MG predicted attention disengagement at 11 months...
May 16, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28510266/look-at-that-video-chat-and-joint-visual-attention-development-among-babies-and-toddlers
#9
Elisabeth R McClure, Yulia E Chentsova-Dutton, Steven J Holochwost, W G Parrott, Rachel Barr
Although many relatives use video chat to keep in touch with toddlers, key features of adult-toddler interaction like joint visual attention (JVA) may be compromised in this context. In this study, 25 families with a child between 6 and 24 months were observed using video chat at home with geographically separated grandparents. We define two types of screen-mediated JVA (across- and within-screen) and report age-related increases in the babies' across-screen JVA initiations, and that family JVA usage was positively related to babies' overall attention during video calls...
May 16, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508590/absenteeism-in-head-start-and-children-s-academic-learning
#10
Arya Ansari, Kelly M Purtell
Using nationally representative data from the Family and Child Experiences Survey 2009 cohort (n = 2,842), this study examined the implications of 3- and 4-year-old's absences from Head Start for their early academic learning. The findings from this study revealed that children who missed more days of school, and especially those who were chronically absent, demonstrated fewer gains in areas of math and literacy during the preschool year. Moreover, excessive absenteeism was found to detract from the potential benefits of quality preschool education and was especially problematic for the early learning of children who entered the Head Start program with a less developed skill set...
May 15, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508396/three-year-olds-reactions-to-a-partner-s-failure-to-perform-her-role-in-a-joint-commitment
#11
Ulrike Kachel, Margarita Svetlova, Michael Tomasello
When children make a joint commitment to collaborate, obligations are created. Pairs of 3-year-old children (N = 144) made a joint commitment to play a game. In three different conditions the game was interrupted in the middle either because: (a) the partner child intentionally defected, (b) the partner child was ignorant about how to play, or (c) the apparatus broke. The subject child reacted differently in the three cases, protesting normatively against defection (with emotional arousal and later tattling), teaching when the partner seemed to be ignorant, or simply blaming the apparatus when it broke...
May 15, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28504422/effects-of-mobile-phones-on-children-s-and-adolescents-health-a-commentary
#12
Lennart Hardell
The use of digital technology has grown rapidly during the last couple of decades. During use, mobile phones and cordless phones emit radiofrequency (RF) radiation. No previous generation has been exposed during childhood and adolescence to this kind of radiation. The brain is the main target organ for RF emissions from the handheld wireless phone. An evaluation of the scientific evidence on the brain tumor risk was made in May 2011 by the International Agency for Research on Cancer at World Health Organization...
May 15, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28504410/unpacking-the-ontogeny-of-gesture-understanding-how-movement-becomes-meaningful-across-development
#13
Elizabeth M Wakefield, Miriam A Novack, Susan Goldin-Meadow
Gestures, hand movements that accompany speech, affect children's learning, memory, and thinking (e.g., Goldin-Meadow, 2003). However, it remains unknown how children distinguish gestures from other kinds of actions. In this study, 4- to 9-year-olds (n = 339) and adults (n = 50) described one of three scenes: (a) an actor moving objects, (b) an actor moving her hands in the presence of objects (but not touching them), or (c) an actor moving her hands in the absence of objects. Participants across all ages were equally able to identify actions on objects as goal directed, but the ability to identify empty-handed movements as representational actions (i...
May 15, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28504324/electromagnetic-fields-pulsed-radiofrequency-radiation-and-epigenetics-how-wireless-technologies-may-affect-childhood-development
#14
Cindy Sage, Ernesto Burgio
Mobile phones and other wireless devices that produce electromagnetic fields (EMF) and pulsed radiofrequency radiation (RFR) are widely documented to cause potentially harmful health impacts that can be detrimental to young people. New epigenetic studies are profiled in this review to account for some neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral changes due to exposure to wireless technologies. Symptoms of retarded memory, learning, cognition, attention, and behavioral problems have been reported in numerous studies and are similarly manifested in autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, as a result of EMF and RFR exposures where both epigenetic drivers and genetic (DNA) damage are likely contributors...
May 15, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28504303/distracted-walking-bicycling-and-driving-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis-of-mobile-technology-and-youth-crash-risk
#15
Despina Stavrinos, Caitlin N Pope, Jiabin Shen, David C Schwebel
This article examined the impact of mobile technology on young pedestrians, bicyclists, and drivers. A systematic search yielded 41 articles meeting inclusion criteria: peer-reviewed, published before February 1, 2016, behavioral outcome related to pedestrian, bicycling, or driving in the presence of mobile technology use, youth sample. Eleven studies were meta-analyzed to evaluate increased risk for crash/near-crash while distracted. Risk of bias and quality of research were assessed. Across methodologies, developmental stages, and type of distracting task, mobile technology use impairs youth safety on the road...
May 15, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28493400/technoference-parent-distraction-with-technology-and-associations-with-child-behavior-problems
#16
Brandon T McDaniel, Jenny S Radesky
Heavy parent digital technology use has been associated with suboptimal parent-child interactions, but no studies examine associations with child behavior. This study investigates whether parental problematic technology use is associated with technology-based interruptions in parent-child interactions, termed "technoference," and whether technoference is associated with child behavior problems. Parent reports from 170 U.S. families (child Mage  = 3.04 years) and actor-partner interdependence modeling showed that maternal and paternal problematic digital technology use predicted greater technoference in mother-child and father-child interactions; then, maternal technoference predicted both mothers' and fathers' reports of child externalizing and internalizing behaviors...
May 10, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28485017/child-and-adolescent-use-of-mobile-phones-an-unparalleled-complex-developmental-phenomenon
#17
Zheng Yan
This article addresses why children's use of mobile phones is an unparalleled complex developmental phenomenon in hopes of providing a broad context for this special section. It first outlines mobile phones as a sophisticated personalized and multifunction technology. Then it presents mobile phone use by children as an unparalleled complex developmental phenomenon on the basis of its four behavioral elements, two mobile cultures, and two developmental processes. It further illustrates the existing knowledge about children's mobile phones use that has been accumulated over the past 23 years and highlights 12 most studied topics, especially distracted driving and radiation exposure...
May 9, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28478655/developing-digital-privacy-children-s-moral-judgments-concerning-mobile-gps-devices
#18
Susan A Gelman, Megan Martinez, Natalie S Davidson, Nicholaus S Noles
New technology poses new moral problems for children to consider. We examined whether children deem object tracking with a mobile GPS device to be a property right. In three experiments, 329 children (4-10 years) and adults were asked whether it is acceptable to track the location of either one's own or another person's possessions using a mobile GPS device. Young children, like adults, viewed object tracking as relatively more acceptable for owners than nonowners. However, whereas adults expressed negative evaluations of someone tracking another person's possessions, young children expressed positive evaluations of this behavior...
May 7, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28478654/a-six-year-longitudinal-study-of-texting-trajectories-during-adolescence
#19
Sarah M Coyne, Laura M Padilla-Walker, Hailey G Holmgren
This study examined growth trajectories of texting (and other media) over a 6-year time period. Participants were 425 adolescents from Washington, USA (age 13 at Time 1, age 18 at Time 6; 48% male, 68% European American). Analyses suggested a curvilinear pattern for texting and social media use, with rates peaking during midadolescence. There was also considerable heterogeneity in trajectories of texting. A growth mixture model revealed four distinct classes of individuals: perpetuals (14%), decreasers (7%), moderates (68%), and increasers (11%)...
May 7, 2017: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28478648/viewing-fantastical-events-versus-touching-fantastical-events-short-term-effects-on-children-s-inhibitory-control
#20
Hui Li, Kaveri Subrahmanyam, Xuejun Bai, Xiaochun Xie, Tao Liu
Three pretest-posttest experiments were conducted to compare the effects of viewing versus interacting with either fantastical or real events on 4- and 6-year-old children's inhibitory control. Experiment 1 (N = 72) suggested that although viewing fantastical events had a negative effect on inhibitory control, interacting with them produced no such disruption. Experiment 2 (N = 17) also found that children's inhibitory control decreased after viewing fantastical events but not after interacting with them...
May 7, 2017: Child Development
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