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Behaviour Research and Therapy

Christopher T Sege, Margaret M Bradley, Peter J Lang
Although avoidance and escape behaviors each contribute to maintaining anxiety disorders, only avoidance completely eliminates exposure to the aversive context. Current research compared anticipatory defensive engagement when aversion could either be completely avoided or escaped after initial exposure; in addition, this research examined the impact of trait anxiety on coping-related defensive engagement. Cues signaled that upcoming rapid action would avoid (block), escape (terminate), or not affect subsequent aversive exposure; the acoustic startle reflex was measured during each anticipatory interval to index defensive engagement, and blink magnitudes were compared across low-, moderate-, and high-anxious individuals...
March 8, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Karina R O'Malley, Allison M Waters
Exposure therapy is a key component of efficacious treatment for anxiety. Biases in the allocation of attention towards versus away from threat assessed prior to exposure-based treatments such as cognitive-behavioural therapy differentially predict treatment outcomes. However, it is unclear whether monitoring versus avoiding threat stimuli influences learning during exposure. Extinction paradigms are the experimental analogue of exposure therapy. Therefore, manipulating attention towards versus away from threat during extinction trials may shed light on the role of attention during exposure therapy...
March 6, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Lillian H Krantz, Shelley McMain, Janice R Kuo
The current research tested whether four dimensions of mindfulness - acceptance without judgment, observing, describing and acting with awareness - predicted frequency of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and mediate the relationship with NSSI outcomes during 20-weeks of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) skills training for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Eighty-four self-harming individuals with BPD were randomized to either DBT skills training or to a waitlist control group. A series of regressions revealed no relationship between dimensions of mindfulness and NSSI at baseline...
March 1, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Amanda Flores, Francisco J López, Bram Vervliet, Pedro L Cobos
Recent studies have shown that avoidance behavior may become excessive and inflexible (i.e., detached from its incentive value and resistant to extinction). On the other hand, prospective intolerance of uncertainty (P-IU) has been defined as a factor leading to excessive responding in uncertain situations. Thus, uncertain avoidance situations may be taken as a relevant scenario to examine the role of intolerance of uncertainty as a factor that facilitates excessive and inflexible avoidance behavior. In our experiment, we tested the hypothesis that P-IU is associated with excessive and inflexible avoidance in an outcome devaluation paradigm...
March 1, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
R Frank, L Schulze, R Hellweg, S Koehne, S Roepke
Although deficits in the recognition of emotional facial expressions are considered a hallmark of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), characterization of abnormalities in the differentiation of emotional expressions (e.g., sad vs. angry) has been rather inconsistent, especially in adults without intellectual impairments who may compensate for their deficits. In addition, previous research neglected the ability to detect emotional expressions (e.g., angry vs. neutral). The present study used a backward masking paradigm to investigate, a) the detection of emotional expressions, and b) the differentiation of emotional expressions in adults diagnosed with high functioning autism or Asperger syndrome (n = 23) compared to neurotypical controls (n = 25)...
February 19, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Clarissa W Ong, Eric B Lee, Michael P Twohig
Many psychotherapies, including cognitive behavioral therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), have been found to be effective interventions for a range of psychological and behavioral health concerns. Another aspect of treatment utility to consider is dropout, as interventions only work if clients are engaged in them. To date, no research has used meta-analytic methods to examine dropout in ACT. Thus, the objectives of the present meta-analysis were to (1) determine the aggregate dropout rate for ACT in randomized controlled trials, (2) compare dropout rates in ACT to those in other psychotherapies, and (3) identify potential moderators of dropout in ACT...
February 16, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Joanne Murray, Helen Scott, Claire Connolly, Adrian Wells
The ability to delay gratification at a young age is a predictor of psychological, cognitive, health, and academic later-life outcomes. This study aimed to extend earlier research and explore whether a metacognitive intervention, Wells' (1990) Attention Training Technique (ATT), could improve young children's ability to delay gratification compared to an active-control (Progressive Muscle Relaxation: PMR), and no-intervention group. One hundred and one children aged 5-6 years old were recruited from schools...
February 15, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Melanie S Harned, Chelsey R Wilks, Sara C Schmidt, Trevor N Coyle
Although functional impairment typically improves during evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) for borderline personality disorder (BPD), functional levels often remain suboptimal after treatment. The present pilot study evaluated whether and how integrating PTSD treatment into an EBP for BPD would improve functional outcomes. Participants were 26 women with BPD, PTSD, and recent suicidal and/or self-injurious behavior who were randomized to receive one year of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) or DBT with the DBT Prolonged Exposure (DBT PE) protocol for PTSD...
February 6, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Maria Helander, John Lochman, Jens Högström, Brjánn Ljótsson, Clara Hellner, Pia Enebrink
For children with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), Parent Management Training (PMT) is a recommended treatment in addition to child Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (child-CBT). There is however a lack of studies investigating the additive effect of group-based child-CBT to PMT for children between 8 and 12 years. The current study investigated the incremental effect of group-based child-CBT, based on the Coping Power Program, when added to the Swedish group-based PMT program KOMET. Outcomes were child behavior problems, child prosocial behavior, parenting skills and the moderating effect of child characteristics...
February 5, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Ian H Stanley, Melanie A Hom, Thomas E Joiner
Help-seeking stigma is a potent barrier to the utilization of mental health services. This study aimed to determine if, compared to a psychoeducation condition, individuals randomized to a novel cognitive bias modification intervention for help-seeking stigma (CBM-HS) demonstrate greater reductions in help-seeking stigma, as well as increases in readiness to change and help-seeking behaviors. Participants included 32 undergraduates with a DSM-5 psychiatric disorder who denied past-year mental health treatment...
February 2, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Matthew Modini, Ronald M Rapee, Maree J Abbott
Negative rumination in social anxiety disorder (SAD) occurs in anticipation of a social event (pre-event rumination) and in its aftermath (post-event rumination). Both are proposed to be key maintaining factors of the vicious cycle of social anxiety. Despite this, there is a dearth of research investigating the processes that mediate the relationship between social anxiety and pre-event rumination and uncertainty regarding the cognitive and attentional processes that mediate the relationship between social anxiety and post-event rumination...
February 2, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Bert Lenaert, Rebecca Jansen, Caroline M van Heugten
Chronic fatigue is highly prevalent in the general population as well as in multiple chronic diseases and psychiatric disorders. Its etiology however remains poorly understood and cannot be explained by biological factors alone. Occurring in a psychosocial context, the experience and communication of fatigue may be shaped by social interactions. In particular, interpersonal operant conditioning may strengthen and perpetuate fatigue complaints. In this experiment, individuals (N = 44) repeatedly rated their currently experienced fatigue while engaging in cognitive effort (working memory task)...
February 2, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Umair Akram, Louise Beattie, Antonia Ypsilanti, John Reidy, Anna Robson, Ashley J Chapman, Nicola L Barclay
People with insomnia often display an attentional bias for sleep-specific stimuli. However, prior studies have mostly utilized sleep-related words and images, and research is yet to examine whether people with insomnia display an attentional bias for sleep-specific (i.e. tired appearing) facial stimuli. This study aimed to examine whether individuals with insomnia present an attentional bias for sleep-specific faces depicting tiredness compared to normal-sleepers. Additionally, we aimed to determine whether the presence of an attentional bias was characterized by vigilance or disengagement...
January 31, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Maud Grol, Anne K Schwenzfeier, Johannes Stricker, Charlotte Booth, Alexander Temple-McCune, Nazanin Derakshan, Colette Hirsch, Eni Becker, Elaine Fox
Worry refers to the experience of uncontrollable negative thoughts. Cognitive models suggest that the combination of negative information processing biases along with diminished attentional control contribute to worry. In the current study we investigate whether promoting a) adaptive interpretation bias and b) efficient deployment of attentional control would influence the tendency to worry. Worry-prone individuals (n = 60) received either active cognitive bias modification for interpretation bias (CBM-I) combined with sham working memory training (WMT), adaptive WMT combined with sham CBM-I, or sham WMT combined with sham CBM-I...
January 20, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Judith Schäfer, Ariel Zvielli, Michael Höfler, Hans-Ulrich Wittchen, Amit Bernstein
BACKGROUND: Fundamental questions regarding the nature and function of attentional bias (AB) to threat in the etiology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remain unanswered. We tested the temporal interplay between trauma exposure, dysregulated attentional processing of threatening information pre- and post-trauma, and the development of posttraumatic intrusions. METHODS: Response time to trauma-related threat, trauma-unrelated threat, as well as to trauma-related but typically emotionally-neutral stimuli was assessed using the dot probe task before and one week after watching a violent movie scene that served as a trauma analogue...
January 11, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Daniel M Stout, Dean T Acheson, Tyler M Moore, Ruben C Gur, Dewleen G Baker, Mark A Geyer, Victoria B Risbrough
PTSD has been associated consistently with abnormalities in fear acquisition and extinction learning and retention. Fear acquisition refers to learning to discriminate between threat and safety cues. Extinction learning reflects the formation of a new inhibitory-memory that competes with a previously learned threat-related memory. Adjudicating the competition between threat memory and the new inhibitory memory during extinction may rely, in part, on cognitive processes such as working memory (WM). Despite significant shared neural circuits and signaling pathways the relationship between WM, fear acquisition, and extinction is poorly understood...
January 5, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
D J Hallford, D W Austin, K Takano, F Raes
Episodic future thinking (EFT) refers to the mental simulation of future events that might be personally-experienced; a crucial mental process in adaptation. Psychiatric disorders are associated with deficits in recalling episodic memory, however, no study has reviewed the empirical literature to assess for similar deficits in EFT. A systematic review comparing psychiatric groups with control groups on the specificity and episodic detail of EFT returned 19 eligible studies. An overall effect of g = -0.84 (95%CI = -1...
January 5, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Erin E Reilly, Elana B Gordis, James F Boswell, Joseph M Donahue, Stephanie M Emhoff, Drew A Anderson
Social appearance anxiety (SAA), or fear of having one's appearance negatively evaluated by others, is a risk factor for eating pathology and social anxiety, but maintenance processes for SAA remain unclear. The current study evaluated repetitive negative thinking (RNT) as a process through which SAA is maintained over time. Undergraduates (N = 126) completed self-report measurements, made an impromptu speech task to induce SAA, and were randomized to either engage in RNT or distraction following the speech task...
January 5, 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
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December 26, 2017: Behaviour Research and Therapy
Paul Blanck, Sarah Perleth, Thomas Heidenreich, Paula Kröger, Beate Ditzen, Hinrich Bents, Johannes Mander
Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) are currently well established in psychotherapy with meta-analyses demonstrating their efficacy. In these multifaceted interventions, the concrete performance of mindfulness exercises is typically integrated in a larger therapeutic framework. Thus, it is unclear whether stand-alone mindfulness exercises (SAMs) without such a framework are beneficial, as well. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis regarding the effects of SAMs on symptoms of anxiety and depression...
March 2018: Behaviour Research and Therapy
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