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Annual Review of Physiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27912679/three-pillars-for-the-neural-control-of-appetite
#1
Scott M Sternson, Anne-Kathrin Eiselt
The neural control of appetite is important for understanding motivated behavior along with the present rising prevalence of obesity. Over the past several years, new tools for cell type-specific neuron activity monitoring and perturbation have enabled increasingly detailed analyses of the mechanisms underlying appetite-control systems. Three major neural circuits strongly and acutely influence appetite but with notably different characteristics. Although these circuits interact, they have distinct properties and thus appear to contribute to separate but interlinked processes influencing appetite, thereby forming three pillars of appetite control...
November 28, 2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27912678/the-physiology-and-molecular-underpinnings-of-the-effects-of-bariatric-surgery-on-obesity-and-diabetes
#2
Simon S Evers, Darleen A Sandoval, Randy J Seeley
Bariatric surgeries, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and vertical sleeve gastrectomy, produce significant and durable weight loss in both humans and rodents. Recently, these surgical interventions have also been termed metabolic surgery because they result in profound metabolic improvements that often surpass the expected improvement due to body weight loss alone. In this review we focus on the weight-loss independent effects of bariatric surgery, which encompass energy expenditure and macronutrient preference, the luminal composition of the gut (i...
November 28, 2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27860833/a-critical-and-comparative-review-of-fluorescent-tools-for-live-cell-imaging
#3
Elizabeth A Specht, Esther Braselmann, Amy E Palmer
Fluorescent tools have revolutionized our ability to probe biological dynamics, particularly at the cellular level. Fluorescent sensors have been developed on several platforms, utilizing either small molecule dyes or fluorescent proteins, to monitor proteins, RNA, DNA, small molecules, and even cellular properties, such as pH and membrane potential. We briefly summarize the impressive history of tool development for these various applications and then discuss the most recent noteworthy developments in more detail...
November 16, 2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27860832/anoctamins-tmem16-proteins-chloride-channels-flirting-with-lipids-and-extracellular-vesicles
#4
Jarred M Whitlock, H Criss Hartzell
Anoctamin/TMEM16 proteins exhibit diverse functions in cells throughout the body and are implicated in several human diseases. Although the founding members ANO1 (TMEM16A) and ANO2 (TMEM16B) are Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, most ANO paralogs are Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipid scramblases that serve as channels facilitating the movement (scrambling) of phospholipids between leaflets of the membrane bilayer. Phospholipid scrambling significantly alters the physical properties of the membrane and its landscape and has vast downstream signaling consequences...
November 16, 2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27860831/the-integrative-physiology-of-insect-chill-tolerance
#5
Johannes Overgaard, Heath A MacMillan
Cold tolerance is important in defining the distribution of insects. Here, we review the principal physiological mechanisms underlying homeostatic failure during cold exposure in this diverse group of ectotherms. Chillsusceptible insects are characterized by an initial loss of neuromuscular function (chill coma) that is caused by decreased membrane potential and reduced excitability of the neuromuscular system. Chronic or severe chilling causes a disruption of ion and water homeostasis across membranes and epithelia that exacerbate the initial effects of chilling on membrane potential and cellular function, and these perturbations are tightly associated with the development of chill injury and mortality...
November 16, 2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27860834/regulation-of-mammalian-oocyte-meiosis-by-intercellular-communication-within-the-ovarian-follicle
#6
Laurinda Jaffe, Jeremy R Egbert
Meiotic progression in mammalian preovulatory follicles is controlled by the granulosa cells around the oocyte. Cyclic GMP (cGMP) generated in the granulosa cells diffuses through gap junctions into the oocyte, maintaining meiotic prophase arrest. Luteinizing hormone then acts on receptors in outer granulosa cells to rapidly decrease cGMP. This occurs by two complementary pathways: cGMP production is decreased by dephosphorylation and inactivation of the NPR2 guanylyl cyclase, and cGMP hydrolysis is increased by activation of the PDE5 phosphodiesterase...
November 14, 2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27813828/receptor-mediated-endocytosis-in-the-proximal-tubule
#7
Megan L Eshbach, Ora A Weisz
Cells lining the proximal tubule (PT) of the kidney are highly specialized for apical endocytosis of filtered proteins and small bioactive molecules from the glomerular ultrafiltrate to maintain essentially protein-free urine. Compromise of this pathway results in low molecular weight (LMW) proteinuria that can progress to end-stage kidney disease. This review describes our current understanding of the endocytic pathway and the multiligand receptors that mediate LMW protein uptake in PT cells, how these are regulated in response to physiologic cues, and the molecular basis of inherited diseases characterized by LMW proteinuria...
October 28, 2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27813827/the-central-control-of-energy-expenditure-exploiting-torpor-for-medical-applications
#8
Matteo Cerri
Autonomic thermoregulation is a recently acquired function, as it appears for the first time in mammals and provides the brain with the ability to control energy expenditure. The importance of such control can easily be highlighted by the ability of a heterogeneous group of mammals to actively reduce metabolic rate and enter a condition of regulated hypometabolism known as torpor. The central neural circuits of thermoregulatory cold defense have been recently unraveled and could in theory be exploited to reduce energy expenditure in species that do not normally use torpor, inducing a state called synthetic torpor...
October 28, 2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27813826/huxleys-missing-filament-form-and-function-of-titin-in-vertebrate-striated-muscle
#9
Stan Lindstedt, Kiisa Nishikawa
Although superthin filaments were inferred from early experiments on muscle, decades passed before their existence was accepted. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that titin, the largest known protein, first appeared in the common ancestor of chordates and nematodes and evolved rapidly via duplication. Twitchin and projectin evolved later by truncation. Sallimus mutants in Drosophila exhibit disrupted sarcomere and chromosome structure, suggesting that giant proteins may have evolved as chromosomal scaffolds that were co-opted for a similar purpose in striated muscles...
October 28, 2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27813830/macrophage-polarization
#10
Peter J Murray
Macrophage polarization refers to how macrophages have been activated at a given point in space and time. Polarization is not fixed, as macrophages are sufficiently plastic to integrate multiple signals, such as those from microbes, damaged tissues, and the normal tissue environment. Three broad pathways control polarization: epigenetic and cell survival pathways that prolong or shorten macrophage development and viability, the tissue microenvironment, and extrinsic factors, such as microbial products and cytokines released in inflammation...
October 21, 2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27813829/vascular-and-immunobiology-of-the-circulatory-sphingosine-1-phosphate-gradient
#11
Keisuke Yanagida, Timothy Hla
Vertebrates are endowed with a closed circulatory system, the evolution of which required novel structural and regulatory changes. Furthermore, immune cell trafficking paradigms adapted to the barriers imposed by the closed circulatory system. How did such changes occur mechanistically? We propose that spatial compartmentalization of the lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) may be one such mechanism. In vertebrates, S1P is spatially compartmentalized in the blood and lymphatic circulation, thus comprising a sharp S1P gradient across the endothelial barrier...
October 21, 2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27813831/neural-mechanisms-for-predicting-the-sensory-consequences-of-behavior-insights-from-electrosensory-systems
#12
Nathaniel B Sawtell
Perception of the environment requires differentiating between external sensory inputs and those that are self-generated. Some of the clearest insights into the neural mechanisms underlying this process have come from studies of the electrosensory systems of fish. Neurons at the first stage of electrosensory processing generate negative images of the electrosensory consequences of the animal's own behavior. By canceling out the effects of predictable, self-generated inputs, negative images allow for the selective encoding of unpredictable, externally generated stimuli...
October 13, 2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26863328/introduction
#13
D Julius
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26863327/vascular-growth-factors-and-glomerular-disease
#14
Christina S Bartlett, Marie Jeansson, Susan E Quaggin
The glomerulus is a highly specialized microvascular bed that filters blood to form primary urinary filtrate. It contains four cell types: fenestrated endothelial cells, specialized vascular support cells termed podocytes, perivascular mesangial cells, and parietal epithelial cells. Glomerular cell-cell communication is critical for the development and maintenance of the glomerular filtration barrier. VEGF, ANGPT, EGF, SEMA3A, TGF-β, and CXCL12 signal in paracrine fashions between the podocytes, endothelium, and mesangium associated with the glomerular capillary bed to maintain filtration barrier function...
2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26863326/regulation-of-renal-electrolyte-transport-by-wnk-and-spak-osr1-kinases
#15
Juliette Hadchouel, David H Ellison, Gerardo Gamba
The discovery of four genes responsible for pseudohypoaldosteronism type II, or familial hyperkalemic hypertension, which features arterial hypertension with hyperkalemia and metabolic acidosis, unmasked a complex multiprotein system that regulates electrolyte transport in the distal nephron. Two of these genes encode the serine-threonine kinases WNK1 and WNK4. The other two genes [kelch-like 3 (KLHL3) and cullin 3 (CUL3)] form a RING-type E3-ubiquitin ligase complex that modulates WNK1 and WNK4 abundance. WNKs regulate the activity of the Na(+):Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC), the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), the renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK), and other transport pathways...
2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26863325/long-term-potentiation-from-camkii-to-ampa-receptor-trafficking
#16
Bruce E Herring, Roger A Nicoll
For more than 20 years, we have known that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) activation is both necessary and sufficient for the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). During this time, tremendous effort has been spent in attempting to understand how CaMKII activation gives rise to this phenomenon. Despite such efforts, there is much to be learned about the molecular mechanisms involved in LTP induction downstream of CaMKII activation. In this review, we highlight recent developments that have shaped our current thinking about the molecular mechanisms underlying LTP and discuss important questions that remain in the field...
2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26863324/the-role-of-pvh-circuits-in-leptin-action-and-energy-balance
#17
Amy K Sutton, Martin G Myers, David P Olson
Although it has been known for more than a century that the brain controls overall energy balance and adiposity by regulating feeding behavior and energy expenditure, the roles for individual brain regions and neuronal subtypes were not fully understood until recently. This area of research is active, and as such our understanding of the central regulation of energy balance is continually being refined as new details emerge. Much of what we now know stems from the discoveries of leptin and the hypothalamic melanocortin system...
2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26734886/supramolecular-organization-of-respiratory-complexes
#18
José Antonio Enríquez
Since the discovery of the existence of superassemblies between mitochondrial respiratory complexes, such superassemblies have been the object of a passionate debate. It is accepted that respiratory supercomplexes are structures that occur in vivo, although which superstructures are naturally occurring and what could be their functional role remain open questions. The main difficulty is to make compatible the existence of superassemblies with the corpus of data that drove the field to abandon the early understanding of the physical arrangement of the mitochondrial respiratory chain as a compact physical entity (the solid model)...
2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26667078/adam-proteases-and-gastrointestinal-function
#19
Jennifer C Jones, Shelly Rustagi, Peter J Dempsey
A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment...
2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26667077/regulation-of-vascular-and-renal-function-by-metabolite-receptors
#20
János Peti-Peterdi, Bellamkonda K Kishore, Jennifer L Pluznick
To maintain metabolic homeostasis, the body must be able to monitor the concentration of a large number of substances, including metabolites, in real time and to use that information to regulate the activities of different metabolic pathways. Such regulation is achieved by the presence of sensors, termed metabolite receptors, in various tissues and cells of the body, which in turn convey the information to appropriate regulatory or positive or negative feedback systems. In this review, we cover the unique roles of metabolite receptors in renal and vascular function...
2016: Annual Review of Physiology
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