journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

American Psychologist

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383981/building-community-resilience-to-violent-extremism-through-genuine-partnerships
#1
B Heidi Ellis, Saida Abdi
What is community resilience in relation to violent extremism, and how can we build it? This article explores strategies to harness community assets that may contribute to preventing youth from embracing violent extremism, drawing from models of community resilience as defined in relation to disaster preparedness. Research suggests that social connection is at the heart of resilient communities and any strategy to increase community resilience must both harness and enhance existing social connections, and endeavor to not damage or diminish them...
April 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383980/risk-assessment-and-the-prevention-of-radicalization-from-nonviolence-into-terrorism
#2
Kiran M Sarma
This article considers the challenges associated with completing risk assessments in countering violent extremism. In particular, it is concerned with risk assessment of those who come to the attention of government and nongovernment organizations as being potentially on a trajectory toward terrorism and where there is an obligation to consider the potential future risk that they may pose. Risk assessment in this context is fraught with difficulty, primarily due to the variable nature of terrorism, the low base-rate problem, and the dearth of strong evidence on relevant risk and resilience factors...
April 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383979/revenge-versus-rapport-interrogation-terrorism-and-torture
#3
Laurence Alison, Emily Alison
This review begins with the historical context of harsh interrogation methods that have been used repeatedly since the Second World War. This is despite the legal, ethical and moral sanctions against them and the lack of evidence for their efficacy. Revenge-motivated interrogations (Carlsmith & Sood, 2009) regularly occur in high conflict, high uncertainty situations and where there is dehumanization of the enemy. These methods are diametrically opposed to the humanization process required for adopting rapport-based methods-for which there is an increasing corpus of studies evidencing their efficacy...
April 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383978/toward-a-psychology-of-humiliation-in-asymmetric-conflict
#4
Clark McCauley
Humiliation is often cited in attempts to understand the origins of asymmetric conflicts, especially conflicts involving terrorism. This article reviews common usage, expert opinion, and experiences in interpersonal and intergroup conflicts to suggest a construct definition of humiliation as a combination of anger and shame. Following appraisal theory, this definition distinguishes between the situational appraisals associated with humiliation (insult and injury; failure to retaliate) and the emotional experience of humiliation (in which the combination of anger and shame may be more synergism than summation)...
April 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383977/recruitment-and-selection-in-violent-extremist-organizations-exploring-what-industrial-and-organizational-psychology-might-contribute
#5
Samuel T Hunter, Neil D Shortland, Matthew P Crayne, Gina S Ligon
For many terrorist organizations, also known as violent extremist organizations (VEOs), their ability to perpetuate violence is often contingent upon successful recruitment and selection of organizational members. Although academic work on terrorist recruitment and selection has improved in recent years, researchers have generally focused more heavily on aspects of radicalization rather than organization attraction and entry. Moreover, a number of terrorism scholars have lamented the lack of conceptual frameworks with which to interpret and extend findings linked to recruitment and selection, specifically...
April 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383976/there-and-back-again-the-study-of-mental-disorder-and-terrorist-involvement
#6
Paul Gill, Emily Corner
For the past 40 years, researchers studied the relationship between mental disorder and terrorist involvement. The literature developed in 4 paradigms, each of which differs in terms of their empirical evidence, the specific mental disorders studied, and their conceptualizations of terrorist involvement. These paradigms have not, however, witnessed linear and incremental improvements upon 1 another. Although 1 paradigm has generally tended to dominate a temporal period, many false assumptions and incorrect interpretations of earlier work permeate into today's discourse...
April 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383975/to-the-fringe-and-back-violent-extremism-and-the-psychology-of-deviance
#7
Arie W Kruglanski, Katarzyna Jasko, Marina Chernikova, Michelle Dugas, David Webber
We outline a general psychological theory of extremism and apply it to the special case of violent extremism (VE). Extremism is defined as motivated deviance from general behavioral norms and is assumed to stem from a shift from a balanced satisfaction of basic human needs afforded by moderation to a motivational imbalance wherein a given need dominates the others. Because motivational imbalance is difficult to sustain, only few individuals do, rendering extreme behavior relatively rare, hence deviant. Thus, individual dynamics translate into social patterns wherein majorities of individuals practice moderation, whereas extremism is the province of the few...
April 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383974/understanding-political-radicalization-the-two-pyramids-model
#8
Clark McCauley, Sophia Moskalenko
This article reviews some of the milestones of thinking about political radicalization, as scholars and security officials struggled after 9/11 to discern the precursors of terrorist violence. Recent criticism of the concept of radicalization has been recognized, leading to a 2-pyramids model that responds to the criticism by separating radicalization of opinion from radicalization of action. Security and research implications of the 2-pyramids model are briefly described, ending with a call for more attention to emotional experience in understanding both radicalization of opinion and radicalization of action...
April 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383973/psychology-of-terrorism-introduction-to-the-special-issue
#9
John G Horgan
Despite the extraordinary social and political consequences often associated with terrorist violence, as well as our responses to it, psychological research on terrorist behavior is conspicuously underdeveloped. This special issue of American Psychologist presents a series of articles that showcase new conceptual, theoretical, and empirical advances in our understanding of terrorism. In doing so, it seeks to not merely summarize recent accomplishments, but to highlight the immense value of explicitly psychological research on these issues, far more of which is called for to realize the potential for informing solutions...
April 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221078/edward-shapiro-1951-2016
#10
Patricia Manz, George DuPaul
Presents an obituary for Edward Shapiro who passed away on March 23, 2016. Ed was a highly accomplished researcher and trainer who was a strong advocate for rigorous scholarship and quality psychological practice. His death was a great loss to the field of school psychology and to everyone who serves children with educational and behavioral disabilities. (PsycINFO Database Record
February 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221077/stanley-stan-kuczaj-ii-1950-2016
#11
Jennifer Vonk
Presents an obituary for Stanley (Stan) Kuczaj II who passed away suddenly on April 14, 2016 at the age of 65 in his home in Hattiesburg Mississippi. The field of comparative cognition and animal behavior lost a leader, a friend, and a mentor that day. At the time of his passing, Stan was a fellow and the president of the Society for Comparative Psychology and Behavioral Neuroscience, Division 6, of the American Psychological Association (APA). He was also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, APA's Divisions 3 and 7, and the Psychonomic Society...
February 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221076/lorraine-williams-greene-1950-2016
#12
Guy Seymour, Adrienne Bradford
Presents an obituary for Lorraine Williams Greene who died on February 25, 2016. Lorraine started her professional career as a school psychologist for the Atlanta Public Schools. For the rest of her life, she was involved in her community through her church, her sorority, the Coalition of One Hundred Black Women, and other national and local service organizations. Within the American Psychological Association (APA), Lorraine was active in Division 18, Psychologists in Public Service, first as Chair of the Police and Public Safety Section, then as the division's representative to APA Council, and, in 2016, as President-elect of the Division...
February 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221075/william-r-shadish-1949-2016
#13
Thomas Cook, Kenneth Lichstein
Presents an obituary for William R. Shadish who passed away on March 27, 2016, after a long, arduous battle with prostate cancer. Shadish was a distinguished professor for the University of California, Merced. He was elected president of three organizations: American Evaluation Association (1996), Society for Research Synthesis Methodology (2013), and Society for Multivariate Experimental Psychology (2014), and received numerous national awards. (PsycINFO Database Record
February 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221074/earl-busby-hunt-1933-2016
#14
Anthony G Greenwald
Presents an obituary for Earl Busby Hunt-known to family, friends, and colleagues as Buz-who died at home in Bellevue, Washington, on April 12, 2016. Buz specialized in artificial intelligence (AI) and had a main focus in cognitive psychology. In fact he was editor of Cognitive Psychology from 1974-1987. Buz's honors include the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Society for Intelligence Research (2009) and the Cattell Award from the Association for Psychological Science (2011) for lifetime contributions...
February 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221073/irving-isadore-gottesman-1930-2016
#15
Thomas J Bouchard, Matt McGue
Presents an obituary for Irving Isadore Gottesman who passed away on June 29, 2016, at his home in Edina, Minnesota. Gottesman was a gifted writer and clnician who will be best remembered as a courageous psychologist who "swam against the current" and researched genetic influence on human behavior, especially psychopathology, at a time when it was considered heresy. (PsycINFO Database Record
February 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221072/reflections-on-quagmires-for-clinicians-and-coaches-comment-on-gebhardt-2016
#16
Anthony M Grant
Professional coaching can be considered an example of a postprofessional discipline-a discipline that transcends the traditional boundaries between professional clinical psychology and business consulting and coaching. Not surprisingly, a number of potential quagmires in relation to ethical, educational, and credentialing issues have arisen. However, such tensions present an opportunity to build more solid foundations for the delivery of professional coaching services. A way forward is to more broadly engage with university-level theoretically grounded, coaching-specific educational programs...
February 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221071/clarifications-on-executive-coaching-comment-on-gebhardt-2016
#17
Joel A DiGirolamo
Multiple issues and concerns are raised around the disparate practices of clinical psychology and coaching. It is important to make a distinction between psychologists who also coach, and coaches who are not trained psychologists who rightfully should not wander into therapeutic roles. Second, one would expect that a code of ethics for a diverse psychological organization would cover a broader spectrum of issues than an organization focused solely on coaching. Finally, credential programs are quite different from academic, postsecondary degree programs, and accreditation of each type should therefore be considered independently...
February 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221070/marketing-trends-impede-conceptual-integration-in-psychology-courses-comment-on-gurung-et-al-2016
#18
Charles S Carver
A recent American Psychologist article on teaching (Gurung et al., 2016) stressed the importance of fostering integration across topic areas. A current trend in publishing and marketing of textbooks is creating pressure that makes this goal harder to implement. The trend is offering custom tailoring of online texts by adopters, letting instructors assign some sections and make other sections unavailable to students. To permit this option, textbook publishers now insist that authors not cross-reference anywhere, so that no instructor will face the possibility of a student looking for material that has not been assigned and thus does not exist...
February 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221069/whatever-happened-to-the-human-experience-in-undergraduate-psychology-comment-on-the-special-issue-on-undergraduate-education-in-psychology-2016
#19
Oksana Yakushko, Derek Hook
This comment addresses the omission of a series of critical reflections in recent discussions of undergraduate education in psychology. The lack of a stronger focus on human meaning and experience, on social context, on methodological diversity, and on social critique limits the critical horizons of undergraduate psychology education. Many perspectives are routinely excluded from undergraduate psychology curricula and associated guidelines, particularly psychoanalytic theories, human science approaches, and related critical standpoints...
February 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221068/why-wasn-t-prevention-included-comment-on-the-special-issue-on-undergraduate-education-in-psychology-2016
#20
Elaine Clanton Harpine
In the February/March 2016 special issue, articles by Gurung et al. (2016) and Norcross et al. (2016) called for change in undergraduate education; however, the special issue failed to include prevention. This comment shows that undergraduate education should include a specialization in prevention, focusing on prevention groups. This could offer a new 4-year career path in psychology, expanding psychology student job opportunities. Prevention groups include health prevention, school-based prevention, violence and anger prevention, and bullying prevention...
February 2017: American Psychologist
journal
journal
23319
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"