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Journal of Human Evolution

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28499698/dental-microwear-and-pliocene-paleocommunity-ecology-of-bovids-primates-rodents-and-suids-at-kanapoi
#1
Peter S Ungar, Elicia F Abella, Jenny H E Burgman, Ignacio A Lazagabaster, Jessica R Scott, Lucas K Delezene, Fredrick K Manthi, J Michael Plavcan, Carol V Ward
Reconstructions of habitat at sites like Kanapoi are key to understanding the environmental circumstances in which hominins evolved during the early Pliocene. While Australopithecus anamensis shows evidence of terrestrial bipedality traditionally associated with a more open setting, its enamel has low δ(13)C values consistent with consumption of C3 foods, which predominate in wooded areas of tropical Africa. Habitat proxies, ranging from paleosols and their carbonates to associated herbivore fauna and their carbon isotope ratios, suggest a heterogeneous setting with both grass and woody plant components, though the proportions of each have been difficult to pin down...
May 9, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28478935/interpretation-of-footprints-from-site-s-confirms-human-like-bipedal-biomechanics-in-laetoli-hominins
#2
David A Raichlen, Adam D Gordon
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 4, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28476281/evaluating-morphometric-body-mass-prediction-equations-with-a-juvenile-human-test-sample-accuracy-and-applicability-to-small-bodied-hominins
#3
Christopher S Walker, Gabriel S Yapuncich, Shilpa Sridhar, Noël Cameron, Steven E Churchill
Body mass is an ecologically and biomechanically important variable in the study of hominin biology. Regression equations derived from recent human samples allow for the reasonable prediction of body mass of later, more human-like, and generally larger hominins from hip joint dimensions, but potential differences in hip biomechanics across hominin taxa render their use questionable with some earlier taxa (i.e., Australopithecus spp.). Morphometric prediction equations using stature and bi-iliac breadth avoid this problem, but their applicability to early hominins, some of which differ in both size and proportions from modern adult humans, has not been demonstrated...
May 2, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28476280/alternative-methods-for-calculating-percentage-prediction-error-and-their-implications-for-predicting-body-mass-in-fossil-taxa
#4
Gabriel S Yapuncich
Since body mass covaries with many ecological aspects of an animal, body mass prediction of fossil taxa is a frequent goal of paleontologists. Body mass prediction often relies on a body mass prediction equation (BMPE): a bivariate relationship between a predictor variable (e.g., molar occlusal area, femoral head breadth) and body mass as observed in extant taxa. A variety of metrics have been used to assess the reliability of BMPEs, including percentage prediction error (%PE), which involves predicting body masses of a test sample comprising individuals with associated masses...
May 2, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438318/the-affinities-of-homo-floresiensis-based-on-phylogenetic-analyses-of%C3%A2-cranial-dental-and-postcranial-characters
#5
Debbie Argue, Colin P Groves, Michael S Y Lee, William L Jungers
Although the diminutive Homo floresiensis has been known for a decade, its phylogenetic status remains highly contentious. A broad range of potential explanations for the evolution of this species has been explored. One view is that H. floresiensis is derived from Asian Homo erectus that arrived on Flores and subsequently evolved a smaller body size, perhaps to survive the constrained resources they faced in a new island environment. Fossil remains of H. erectus, well known from Java, have not yet been discovered on Flores...
April 19, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28330740/estimating-body-size-in-early-primates-the-case-of-archicebus-and-teilhardina
#6
Marian Dagosto, Daniel Gebo, Xijun Ni, Thierry Smith
Obtaining accurate estimations of the body mass of fossil primates has always been a subject of interest in paleoanthropology because mass is an important determinant for so many other aspects of biology, ecology, and life history. This paper focuses on the issues involved in attempting to reconstruct the mass of two early Eocene haplorhine primates, Teilhardina and Archicebus, which pose particular problems due to their small size and temporal and phylogenetic distance from extant primates. In addition to a ranking of variables from more to less useful, the effect of using models of varying taxonomic and size compositions is examined...
March 19, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318607/a-newly-discovered-galagid-fossil-from-nakali-an-early-late-miocene-locality-of-east-africa
#7
Yutaka Kunimatsu, Masato Nakatsukasa, Tetsuya Sakai, Mototaka Saneyoshi, Yoshihiro Sawada, Hideo Nakaya
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 16, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526292/australopithecus-sediba-and-the-emergence-of-homo-questionable-evidence-from-the-cranium-of-the-juvenile-holotype-mh-1
#8
William H Kimbel, Yoel Rak
Malapa Hominin (MH) 1, an immature individual whose second permanent molars had recently reached occlusion at the time of death, is the holotype of Australopithecus sediba, a 2-myr-old South African taxon that has been hypothesized to link phylogenetically australopith-grade hominins to the Homo clade. Given the existence of 2.8 myr-old fossils of Homo in eastern Africa, this hypothesis implies a ghost lineage spanning at least 800 kyr. An alternative hypothesis posits a unique relationship between A. sediba and Australopithecus africanus, which predates the Malapa hominins in southern Africa and whose phylogenetic relationships remain ambiguous...
June 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526291/direct-radiocarbon-dating-and-dna-analysis-of-the-darra-i-kur-afghanistan-human-temporal-bone
#9
Katerina Douka, Viviane Slon, Chris Stringer, Richard Potts, Alexander Hübner, Matthias Meyer, Fred Spoor, Svante Pääbo, Tom Higham
The temporal bone discovered in the 1960s from the Darra-i-Kur cave in Afghanistan is often cited as one of the very few Pleistocene human fossils from Central Asia. Here we report the first direct radiocarbon date for the specimen and the genetic analyses of DNA extracted and sequenced from two areas of the bone. The new radiocarbon determination places the find to ∼4500 cal BP (∼2500 BCE) contradicting an assumed Palaeolithic age of ∼30,000 years, as originally suggested. The DNA retrieved from the specimen originates from a male individual who carried mitochondrial DNA of the modern human type...
June 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526290/hominoid-arcade-shape-pattern-and-magnitude-of-covariation
#10
Stefanie Stelzer, Philipp Gunz, Simon Neubauer, Fred Spoor
The shape of the dental arcade and canine size distinguish extant humans from all apes. Humans are characterized by a parabolic arcade with short postcanine tooth rows and small canines, whereas apes have long, U-shaped arcades with large canines. The evolutionary and biomechanical mechanisms underlying arcade shape differences between and within groups are not well understood. It is unclear, for example, whether evolutionary changes in the covariation among modules comprising the upper and lower jaws are the cause and/or consequence of different arcade shapes...
June 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526289/the-howieson-s-poort-fauna-from-sibudu-cave-documenting-continuity-and-change-within-middle-stone-age-industries
#11
Jamie L Clark
The Howieson's Poort (HP; ∼65-59 ka) continues to be a source of interest to scholars studying human behavioral evolution during the Late Pleistocene. This is in large part because the HP preserves evidence for a suite of innovative technologies and behaviors (including geometric backed tools and engraved ostrich eggshell), but also because the disappearance of the innovative behaviors associated with this phase is not well understood. Here, I present taphonomic and taxonomic data on the full sample of macromammal remains excavated from the HP deposits at Sibudu Cave under the direction of Lyn Wadley...
June 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526288/the-association-between-mid-facial-morphology-and-climate-in-northeast-europe-differs-from-that-in-north-asia-implications-for-understanding-the-morphology-of-late-pleistocene-homo-sapiens
#12
Andrej A Evteev, Alla A Movsesian, Alexandra N Grosheva
The climate of northeastern Europe is likely to resemble in many ways Late Pleistocene periglacial conditions in Europe, but there have been relatively few studies exploring the association between climate and morphology in the mid-face of modern northeastern European populations. To fill this gap, we sampled 540 male skulls from 22 European and Near Eastern groups, including 314 skulls from 11 populations from northeastern Europe, to test for possible climate-morphology association at the continental scale...
June 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526287/functional-analyses-of-the-primate-upper-cervical-vertebral-column
#13
Thierra K Nalley, Neysa Grider-Potter
Recent work has highlighted functional correlations between direct measures of head and neck posture and primate cervical bony morphology. Primates with more horizontal necks exhibit middle and lower cervical vertebral features that indicate increased mechanical advantage for deep nuchal musculature and mechanisms for column curvature formation and maintenance. How features of the C1 and C2 reflect quantified measures of posture have yet to be examined. This study incorporates bony morphology from the upper cervical levels from 20 extant primate species in order to investigate further how posture correlates with cervical vertebrae morphology...
June 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526286/physical-activity-alters-limb-bone-structure-but-not-entheseal-morphology
#14
Ian J Wallace, Julia M Winchester, Anne Su, Doug M Boyer, Nicolai Konow
Studies of ancient human skeletal remains frequently proceed from the assumption that individuals with robust limb bones and/or rugose, hypertrophic entheses can be inferred to have been highly physically active during life. Here, we experimentally test this assumption by measuring the effects of exercise on limb bone structure and entheseal morphology in turkeys. Growing females were either treated with a treadmill-running regimen for 10 weeks or served as controls. After the experiment, femoral cortical and trabecular bone structure were quantified with μCT in the mid-diaphysis and distal epiphysis, respectively, and entheseal morphology was quantified in the lateral epicondyle...
June 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526285/single-grain-osl-chronologies-for-the-still-bay-and-howieson-s-poort-industries-and-the-transition-between-them-further-analyses-and-statistical-modelling
#15
Zenobia Jacobs, Richard G Roberts
The chronology of the Still Bay (SB) and Howieson's Poort (HP) lithic industries remains an issue of keen interest because of the central role of these two phases of technological and behavioural innovation within the Middle Stone Age of southern Africa. Several dating studies have been conducted on SB and HP sites, including a pair published by the present authors and our colleagues in 2008 and 2013. These reported the results of systematically applying single-grain optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating procedures to 10 sites in South Africa, Lesotho and Namibia to constrain the timing of the start and end of the SB and HP and reveal the existence of a gap of several millennia between them...
June 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434542/the-neandertal-vertebral-column-2-the-lumbar-spine
#16
Asier Gómez-Olivencia, Mikel Arlegi, Alon Barash, Jay T Stock, Ella Been
Here we provide the most extensive metric and morphological analysis performed to date on the Neandertal lumbar spine. Neandertal lumbar vertebrae show differences from modern humans in both the vertebral body and in the neural arch, although not all Neandertal lumbar vertebrae differ from modern humans in the same way. Differences in the vertebral foramen are restricted to the lowermost lumbar vertebrae (L4 and L5), differences in the orientation of the upper articular facets appear in the uppermost lumbar vertebrae (probably in L1 and L2-L3), and differences in the horizontal angle of the transverse process appear in L2-L4...
May 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434541/phytoliths-indicate-significant-arboreal-cover-at-sahelanthropus-type-locality-tm266-in-northern-chad-and-a-decrease-in-later-sites
#17
Alice Novello, Doris Barboni, Florence Sylvestre, Anne-Elisabeth Lebatard, Christine Paillès, Didier L Bourlès, Andossa Likius, Hassane Taisso Mackaye, Patrick Vignaud, Michel Brunet
We analyzed phytolith and diatom remains preserved at 45 Miocene and Pliocene localities dated between 8 and 1 Ma in northern Chad (16-17°N). Some of these localities yielded cranial remains, lower jaws, and teeth of the hominin species Australopithecus bahrelghazali (∼3.6 Ma) and Sahelanthropus tchadensis (∼7 Ma). Of the 111 sediment samples analyzed, 41 yielded phytoliths, 20 yielded diatoms, and seven yielded both phytoliths and diatoms. Freshwater planktonic and tychoplanktonic diatom species, indicative of lacustrine conditions, are dominant (>91%) in the samples...
May 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434540/an-updated-age-for-the-xujiayao-hominin-from-the-nihewan-basin-north-china-implications-for-middle-pleistocene-human-evolution-in-east-asia
#18
Hong Ao, Chun-Ru Liu, Andrew P Roberts, Peng Zhang, Xinwen Xu
The Xujiayao site in the Nihewan Basin (North China) is one of the most important Paleolithic sites in East Asia. Twenty Homo fossils, which were previously assigned to an archaic Homo sapiens group, have been excavated along with more than 30,000 lithic artifacts and ∼5000 mammalian fossil specimens. Dating of the Xujiayao hominin has been pursued since its excavation in the 1970s, but its age has remained controversial because of limitations of the dating techniques that have been applied to available materials...
May 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434539/evolutionary-anatomy-of-the-neandertal-ulna-and-radius-in-the-light-of-the-new-el-sidr%C3%A3-n-sample
#19
Laura Pérez-Criado, Antonio Rosas
This paper aims to improve our understanding of the phylogenetic trait polarity related to hominin forearm evolution, in particular those traits traditionally defined as "Neandertal features." To this aim, twelve adult and adolescent fragmented forelimb elements (including ulnae and radii) of Homo neanderthalensis recovered from the site of El Sidrón (Asturias, Spain) were examined comparatively using three-dimensional geometric and traditional morphometrics. Mean centroid size and shape comparisons, principal components analysis, and phylogenetic signal analysis were undertaken...
May 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434538/thinking-locally-environmental-reconstruction-of-middle-and-later-stone-age-archaeological-sites-in-ethiopia-kenya-and-zambia-based-on-ungulate-stable-isotopes
#20
Joshua R Robinson
Our knowledge of the Pleistocene environments of Africa consists primarily of data at a scale too coarse to capture the full habitat variation important to hominins 'on the ground.' These environments are complex, highly variable, and poorly understood. As such, data from individual sites are a needed addition to our current paleoenvironmental reconstructions. This study offers a site-based approach focusing on stable isotope analyses of fossil faunal tooth enamel from three archaeological sites in tropical Africa...
May 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
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