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Journal of Human Evolution

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27887742/corrigendum-to-dentognathic-remains-of-australopithecus-afarensis-from-nefuraytu-woranso-mille-ethiopia-comparative-description-geology-and-paleoecological-context-j-hum-evol-100-2016-35-53
#1
Yohannes Haile-Selassie, Stephanie M Melillo, Timothy M Ryan, Naomi E Levin, Beverly Z Saylor, Alan Deino, Ronald Mundil, Gary Scott, Mulugeta Alene, Luis Gibert
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 23, 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27866756/cuboid-morphology-of-a-basal-anthropoid-from-the-eocene-of-china
#2
Daniel L Gebo, Marian Dagosto, K Christopher Beard, Xijun Ni
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 18, 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27865439/a-scratch-by-any-other-name-a-comment-on-lucas-et%C3%A2-al-s-reply-to-scratching-the-surface-a-critique-of-lucas-et%C3%A2-al-2013-s-conclusion-that-phytoliths-do-not-abrade-enamel-j-hum-evol-74-2016-130-133
#3
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27855981/the-thigh-and-leg-of-homo-naledi
#4
Damiano Marchi, Christopher S Walker, Pianpian Wei, Trenton W Holliday, Steven E Churchill, Lee R Berger, Jeremy M DeSilva
This paper describes the 108 femoral, patellar, tibial, and fibular elements of a new species of Homo (Homo naledi) discovered in the Dinaledi chamber of the Rising Star cave system in South Africa. Homo naledi possesses a mosaic of primitive, derived, and unique traits functionally indicative of a bipedal hominin adapted for long distance walking and possibly running. Traits shared with australopiths include an anteroposteriorly compressed femoral neck, a mediolaterally compressed tibia, and a relatively circular fibular neck...
November 15, 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27855982/the-skull-of-homo-naledi
#5
Myra F Laird, Lauren Schroeder, Heather M Garvin, Jill E Scott, Mana Dembo, Davorka Radovčić, Charles M Musiba, Rebecca R Ackermann, Peter Schmid, John Hawks, Lee R Berger, Darryl J de Ruiter
The species Homo naledi was recently named from specimens recovered from the Dinaledi Chamber of the Rising Star cave system in South Africa. This large skeletal sample lacks associated faunal material and currently does not have a known chronological context. In this paper, we present comprehensive descriptions and metric comparisons of the recovered cranial and mandibular material. We describe 41 elements attributed to Dinaledi Hominin (DH1-DH5) individuals and paratype U.W. 101-377, and 32 additional cranial fragments...
November 14, 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27839696/the-upper-limb-of-homo-naledi
#6
Elen M Feuerriegel, David J Green, Christopher S Walker, Peter Schmid, John Hawks, Lee R Berger, Steven E Churchill
The evolutionary transition from an ape-like to human-like upper extremity occurred in the context of a behavioral shift from an upper limb predominantly involved in locomotion to one adapted for manipulation. Selection for overarm throwing and endurance running is thought to have further shaped modern human shoulder girdle morphology and its position about the thorax. Homo naledi (Dinaledi Chamber, Rising Star Cave, Cradle of Humankind, South Africa) combines an australopith-like cranial capacity with dental characteristics akin to early Homo...
November 10, 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27836166/skull-diversity-in-the-homo-lineage-and-the-relative-position-of-homo-naledi
#7
Lauren Schroeder, Jill E Scott, Heather M Garvin, Myra F Laird, Mana Dembo, Davorka Radovčić, Lee R Berger, Darryl J de Ruiter, Rebecca R Ackermann
The discovery of Homo naledi has expanded the range of phenotypic variation in Homo, leading to new questions surrounding the mosaic nature of morphological evolution. Though currently undated, its unique morphological pattern and possible phylogenetic relationships to other hominin taxa suggest a complex evolutionary scenario. Here, we perform geometric morphometric analyses on H. naledi cranial and mandibular remains to investigate its morphological relationship with species of Homo and Australopithecus...
November 8, 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27756484/on-the-calculation-of-occlusal-bite-pressures-for-fossil-hominins
#8
Javier Ruiz, Juan Luis Arsuaga
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 15, 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27692570/tooth-wear-a-response-to-scratching-the-surface-a-critique-of-lucas-et%C3%A2-al-2013-s-conclusion-that-phytoliths-do-not-abrade-enamel-j-hum-evol-74-2014-130-133
#9
Peter W Lucas, Ridwaan Omar, Khaled Al-Fadhalah, Abdulwahab S Almusallam, Amanda G Henry, Shaji Michael, Lidia Arockia Thai, Jörg Watzke, David S Strait, Adam van Casteren, Anthony G Atkins
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 27, 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886813/cranial-vault-thickness-in-non-human-primates-allometric-and-geometric-analyses-of-the-vault-and-its-component-layers
#10
Lynn E Copes
Extremely thick cranial vaults have been noted as a diagnostic characteristic of Homo erectus since the first fossil of the species was identified, but relatively little work has been done on elucidating its variation within extant non-human primates. Cranial vault thickness (CVT) is not a monolithic trait, and the relationship of its layers to other morphological variables is unknown. Total CVT and the thickness of the cortical and diploë layers individually, as well as the ratio between diploë and total thickness, were calculated from 258 female individuals from 47 species of non-human primate...
December 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886812/foraging-potential-of-underground-storage-organ-plants-in-the-southern-cape-south-africa
#11
Elzanne Singels, Alastair J Potts, Richard M Cowling, Curtis W Marean, Jan De Vynck, Karen J Esler
Underground storage organs (USOs) serve as a staple source of carbohydrates for many hunter-gatherer societies and they feature prominently in discussions of diets of early modern humans. While the way of life of hunter-gatherers in South Africa's Cape no longer exists, there is extensive ethnographic, historical, and archaeological evidence of hunter-gatherers' use of USOs. This is to be expected, given that the Cape supports the largest concentration of plant species with USOs globally. The southern Cape is the location of several Middle Stone Age sites that are highly significant to research on the origins of behaviourally modern humans, and this provided the context for our research...
December 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886811/morphoarchitectural-variation-in-south-african-fossil-cercopithecoid-endocasts
#12
Amélie Beaudet, Jean Dumoncel, Frikkie de Beer, Benjamin Duployer, Stanley Durrleman, Emmanuel Gilissen, Jakobus Hoffman, Christophe Tenailleau, John Francis Thackeray, José Braga
Despite the abundance of well-preserved crania and natural endocasts in the South African Plio-Pleistocene cercopithecoid record, which provide direct information relevant to the evolution of their endocranial characteristics, few studies have attempted to characterize patterns of external brain morphology in this highly successful primate Superfamily. The availability of non-destructive penetrating radiation imaging systems, together with recently developed computer-based analytical tools, allow for high resolution virtual imaging and modeling of the endocranial casts and thus disclose new perspectives in comparative paleoneurology...
December 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886810/early-modern-human-lithic-technology-from-jerimalai-east-timor
#13
Ben Marwick, Chris Clarkson, Sue O'Connor, Sophie Collins
Jerimalai is a rock shelter in East Timor with cultural remains dated to 42,000 years ago, making it one of the oldest known sites of modern human activity in island Southeast Asia. It has special global significance for its record of early pelagic fishing and ancient shell fish hooks. It is also of regional significance for its early occupation and comparatively large assemblage of Pleistocene stone artefacts. Three major findings arise from our study of the stone artefacts. First, there is little change in lithic technology over the 42,000 year sequence, with the most noticeable change being the addition of new artefact types and raw materials in the mid-Holocene...
December 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886809/small-mammal-utilization-by-middle-stone-age-humans-at-die-kelders-cave-1-and-pinnacle-point-site-5-6-western-cape-province-south-africa
#14
Aaron Armstrong
Reported here are the results of a taphonomic analysis of the small mammals (between 0.75 kg and 4.5 kg adult body weight) and size 1 bovids (≤20 kg adult body weight) from the Middle Stone Age (MSA) sites of Die Kelders Cave 1 (DK1) and Pinnacle Point Site 5-6 (PP5-6), Western Cape Province, South Africa. This study provides a comprehensive taphonomic analysis of MSA small mammals with a focus on discerning the role of humans in their accumulation and the implications for human behavioral adaptations...
December 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886808/comparative-isotope-ecology-of-african-great-apes
#15
Vicky M Oelze, Geraldine Fahy, Gottfried Hohmann, Martha M Robbins, Vera Leinert, Kevin Lee, Henk Eshuis, Nicole Seiler, Erin G Wessling, Josephine Head, Christophe Boesch, Hjalmar S Kühl
The isotope ecology of great apes is a useful reference for palaeodietary reconstructions in fossil hominins. As extant apes live in C3-dominated habitats, variation in isotope signatures is assumed to be low compared to hominoids exploiting C4-plant resources. However, isotopic differences between sites and between and within individuals are poorly understood due to the lack of vegetation baseline data. In this comparative study, we included all species of free-ranging African great apes (Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, Gorilla sp...
December 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27586079/the-earliest-modern-homo-sapiens-in-china
#16
Véronique Michel, Hélène Valladas, Guanjun Shen, Wei Wang, Jian-Xin Zhao, Chuan-Chou Shen, Patricia Valensi, Christopher J Bae
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27765151/comparative-biomechanics-of-australopithecus-sediba-mandibles
#17
David J Daegling, Kristian J Carlson, Paul Tafforeau, Darryl J de Ruiter, Lee R Berger
Fossils attributed to Australopithecus sediba are described as having phylogenetic affinities with early Homo to the exclusion of other South African australopiths. With respect to functional anatomy of mastication, one implication of this hypothesis is that A. sediba mandibles should exhibit absolutely and relatively reduced stiffness and strength in comparison to Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus jaws. Examination of cortical bone distribution in the MH 1 and MH 2 mandibles of A. sediba (evaluated against samples of Pan, early and modern Homo as well as A...
November 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27765150/oh-65-the-earliest-evidence-for-right-handedness-in-the-fossil-record
#18
David W Frayer, Ronald J Clarke, Ivana Fiore, Robert J Blumenschine, Alejandro Pérez-Pérez, Laura M Martinez, Ferran Estebaranz, Ralph Holloway, Luca Bondioli
Labial striations on the anterior teeth have been documented in numerous European pre-Neandertal and Neandertal fossils and serve as evidence for handedness. OH-65, dated at 1.8 mya, shows a concentration of oblique striations on, especially, the left I(1) and right I(1), I(2) and C(1), which signal that it was right-handed. From these patterns we contend that OH-65 was habitually using the right hand, over the left, in manipulating objects during some kind of oral processing. In living humans right-handedness is generally correlated with brain lateralization, although the strength of the association is questioned by some...
November 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27765149/mandibular-ramus-shape-of-australopithecus-sediba-suggests-a-single-variable-species
#19
Terrence B Ritzman, Claire E Terhune, Philipp Gunz, Chris A Robinson
The fossils from Malapa cave, South Africa, attributed to Australopithecus sediba, include two partial skeletons-MH1, a subadult, and MH2, an adult. Previous research noted differences in the mandibular rami of these individuals. This study tests three hypotheses that could explain these differences. The first two state that the differences are due to ontogenetic variation and sexual dimorphism, respectively. The third hypothesis, which is relevant to arguments suggesting that MH1 belongs in the genus Australopithecus and MH2 in Homo, is that the differences are due to the two individuals representing more than one taxon...
November 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27765148/dentognathic-remains-of-australopithecus-afarensis-from-nefuraytu-woranso-mille-ethiopia-comparative-description-geology-and-paleoecological-context
#20
Yohannes Haile-Selassie, Stephanie M Melillo, Timothy M Ryan, Naomi E Levin, Beverly Z Saylor, Alan Deino, Ronald Mundil, Gary Scott, Mulugeta Alene, Luis Gibert
Australopithecus afarensis is the best-known and most dimorphic species in the early hominin fossil record. Here, we present a comparative description of new fossil specimens of Au. afarensis from Nefuraytu, a 3.330-3.207 million-years-old fossil collection area in the Woranso-Mille study area, central Afar, Ethiopia. These specimens include NFR-VP-1/29, one of the most complete mandibles assigned to the species thus far and among the largest mandibles attributed to Au. afarensis, likely representing a male individual...
November 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
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