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Journal of Human Evolution

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28917702/hominin-track-assemblages-from-okote-member-deposits-near-ileret-kenya-and-their-implications-for-understanding-fossil-hominin-paleobiology-at-1-5%C3%A2-ma
#1
Kevin G Hatala, Neil T Roach, Kelly R Ostrofsky, Roshna E Wunderlich, Heather L Dingwall, Brian A Villmoare, David J Green, David R Braun, John W K Harris, Anna K Behrensmeyer, Brian G Richmond
Tracks can provide unique, direct records of behaviors of fossil organisms moving across their landscapes millions of years ago. While track discoveries have been rare in the human fossil record, over the last decade our team has uncovered multiple sediment surfaces within the Okote Member of the Koobi Fora Formation near Ileret, Kenya that contain large assemblages of ∼1.5 Ma fossil hominin tracks. Here, we provide detailed information on the context and nature of each of these discoveries, and we outline the specific data that are preserved on the Ileret hominin track surfaces...
September 13, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28917701/paleoecological-insights-from-fossil-freshwater-mollusks-of-the-kanapoi-formation-omo-turkana-basin-kenya
#2
Bert Van Bocxlaer
The Early Pliocene Kanapoi Formation of the Omo-Turkana Basin consists of two fluvial/deltaic sedimentary sequences with an intermediate lacustrine sequence that was deposited in Paleolake Lonyumun, the earliest large lake in the basin. Overall, the geology and vertebrate paleontology of the Kanapoi Formation are well studied, but its freshwater mollusks, despite being a major component of the benthic ecosystem, have not been subjected to in-depth study. Here I present the first treatment of these mollusks, which have been retrieved mainly from the lacustrine but also from the upper fluvial sediments, with a focus on paleoecological implications...
September 13, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28882548/pleistocene-fossil-woods-from-the-okote-member-site-fwjj-14-in-the-ileret-region-koobi-fora-formation-northern-kenya
#3
Marion K Bamford
On the eastern side of Lake Turkana in northern Kenya are extensive Plio-Pleistocene deposits containing a rich diversity of fossil mammals, hominins and flora within the radiometrically dated tuffaceous, lacustrine and fluvial sequence. Reconstruction of this landscape and paleoenvironment are part of an ongoing multinational and multidisciplinary human evolution project in the eastern Turkana Basin. Today there is a huge lake in the Rift Valley but it has fluctuated since the early Pliocene. Silicified wood is fairly common in some areas of the Koobi Fora Formation...
September 4, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28870375/dietary-traits-of-the-ungulates-from-the-hwk-ee-site-at-olduvai-gorge-tanzania-diachronic-changes-and-seasonality
#4
Florent Rivals, Kevin T Uno, Faysal Bibi, Michael C Pante, Jackson Njau, Ignacio de la Torre
The Oldowan site HWK EE (Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania) has yielded a large fossil and stone tool assemblage at the transition from Lower to Middle Bed II, ∼1.7 Ma. Integrated tooth wear and stable isotope analyses were performed on the three most abundant ungulate taxa from HWK EE, namely Alcelaphini, cf. Antidorcas recki (Antilopini) and Equus oldowayensis (Equini), to infer dietary traits in each taxon. Some paleodietary changes were observed for cf. A. recki and E. oldowayensis based on tooth wear at the transition from the Lemuta to the Lower Augitic Sandstone (LAS) interval within the HWK EE sequence...
September 1, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28867279/investigating-hominin-carnivory-in-the-okote-member-of-koobi-fora-kenya-with-an-actualistic-model-of-carcass-consumption-and-traces-of-butchery-on-the-elbow
#5
Stephen R Merritt
Previous zooarchaeological analysis at Koobi Fora indicates that Okote Member hominins were the primary agents of bone assemblage formation, gained early access to large and small mammal flesh, and consumed both high- and low-ranked carcass parts. The discovery of additional butchered specimens prompted the re-analysis presented here of three large and well-preserved zooarchaeological assemblages from the Okote member, GaJi14, FwJj14N and FwJj14S, to revisit paleoecological hypotheses about tool-assisted carnivory...
August 31, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28844328/new-fossils-of-australopithecus-anamensis-from-kanapoi-west%C3%A2-turkana-kenya-2012-2015
#6
C V Ward, J M Plavcan, F K Manthi
Kanapoi, Kenya, has yielded the earliest evidence of the genus Australopithecus, Australopithecus anamensis. Renewed fieldwork from 2012 through 2015 yielded 18 new fossils attributable to this species. The new specimens include the second maxillary fragment known from a Kanapoi hominin and the first from a relatively young adult. The new maxilla has the distinctive rounded nasal aperture margin characteristic of A. anamensis. A second partial proximal tibia from the site is the first postcranial element from a small A...
August 22, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28838563/a-volumetric-technique-for-fossil-body-mass-estimation-applied-to-australopithecus-afarensis
#7
Charlotte A Brassey, Thomas G O'Mahoney, Andrew T Chamberlain, William I Sellers
Fossil body mass estimation is a well established practice within the field of physical anthropology. Previous studies have relied upon traditional allometric approaches, in which the relationship between one/several skeletal dimensions and body mass in a range of modern taxa is used in a predictive capacity. The lack of relatively complete skeletons has thus far limited the potential application of alternative mass estimation techniques, such as volumetric reconstruction, to fossil hominins. Yet across vertebrate paleontology more broadly, novel volumetric approaches are resulting in predicted values for fossil body mass very different to those estimated by traditional allometry...
August 21, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802725/body-mass-estimation-in-hominoids-age-and-locomotor-effects
#8
M Loring Burgess, Shannon C McFarlin, Antoine Mudakikwa, Michael R Cranfield, Christopher B Ruff
While there are a number of methods available for estimation of body mass in adult nonhuman primates, very few are available for juveniles, despite the potential utility of such estimations in both analyses of fossils and in museum collection based research. Furthermore, because of possible scaling differences, adult based body mass estimation equations may not be appropriate for non-adults. In this study, we present new body mass estimation equations for both adult and immature nonhuman hominoids based on joint and metaphyseal dimensions...
August 9, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802724/juvenile-body-mass-estimation-a-methodological-evaluation
#9
Libby Cowgill
Two attempts have been made to develop body mass prediction formulae specifically for immature remains: Ruff (Ruff, C.C., 2007, Body size prediction from juvenile skeletal remains. American Journal Physical Anthropology 133, 698-716) and Robbins et al. (Robbins, G., Sciulli, P.W., Blatt, S.H., 2010. Estimating body mass in subadult human skeletons. American Journal Physical Anthropology 143, 146-150). While both were developed from the same reference population, they differ in their independent variable selection: Ruff (2008) used measures of metaphyseal and articular surface size to predict body mass in immature remains, whereas Robbins et al...
August 9, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802723/site-formation-processes-of-the-early-acheulean-assemblage-at-ef-hr-olduvai-gorge-tanzania
#10
Ignacio de la Torre, Karol Wehr
This paper investigates the formation history of the early Acheulean site of EF-HR (Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania). Our study focuses on the main site (T2-Main Trench) and adjacent trenches (T12 and T9), which constitute the bulk of the archaeological assemblage recently excavated in the EF-HR area (de la Torre et al., submitted). Site formation processes are investigated through taphonomic proxies and spatial analysis, and consider artifact features, orientation patterns, and topographic data retrieved during archaeological excavation...
August 9, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28797516/the-carnivorous-feeding-behavior-of-early-homo-at-hwk-ee-bed-ii-olduvai-gorge-tanzania
#11
Michael C Pante, Jackson K Njau, Blaire Hensley-Marschand, Trevor L Keevil, Carmen Martín-Ramos, Renata Franco Peters, Ignacio de la Torre
The regular consumption of large mammal carcasses, as evidenced by butchery marks on fossils recovered from Early Stone Age archaeological sites, roughly coincides with the appearance of Homo habilis. However, the significance of this niche expansion cannot be appreciated without an understanding of hominin feeding behavior and their ecological interactions with mammalian carnivores. The Olduvai Geochronology and Archaeology Project (OGAP) has recovered a large and well-preserved fossil assemblage from the HWK EE site, which was deposited just prior to the first appearance of Acheulean technology at Olduvai Gorge and likely represents one of the last H...
August 7, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28780964/the-contexts-and-early-acheulean-archaeology-of-the-ef-hr-paleo-landscape-olduvai-gorge-tanzania
#12
Ignacio de la Torre, Rosa M Albert, Richard Macphail, Lindsay J McHenry, Michael C Pante, Ágata Rodríguez-Cintas, Ian G Stanistreet, Harald Stollhofen
Renewed fieldwork at the early Acheulean site of EF-HR (Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania) has included detailed stratigraphic studies of the sequence, extended excavations in the main site, and has placed eleven additional trenches within an area of nearly 1 km(2), to sample the same stratigraphic interval as in the main trench across the broader paleo-landscape. Our new stratigraphic work suggests that EF-HR is positioned higher in the Bed II sequence than previously proposed, which has implications for the age of the site and its stratigraphic correlation to other Olduvai Middle Bed II sites...
August 3, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28760580/landscape-scale-heterogeneity-in-the-east-turkana-ecosystem-during-the-okote-member-1-56-1-38-ma
#13
D B Patterson, D R Braun, A K Behrensmeyer, S B Lehmann, S R Merritt, J S Reeves, B A Wood, R Bobe
Placing the biological adaptations of Pleistocene hominins within a well-resolved ecological framework has been a longstanding goal of paleoanthropology. This effort, however, has been challenging due to the discontinuous nature of paleoecological data spanning many important periods in hominin evolution. Sediments from the Upper Burgi (1.98-1.87 Ma), KBS (1.87-1.56 Ma) and Okote (1.56-1.38 Ma) members of the Koobi Fora Formation at East Turkana in northern Kenya document an important time interval in the evolutionary history of the hominin genera Homo and Paranthropus...
July 28, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28755787/a-hidden-treasure-of-the-lower-pleistocene-at-olduvai-gorge-tanzania-the-leakey-hwk-ee-assemblage
#14
Michael C Pante, Ignacio de la Torre
HWK EE is a little-known archaeological site from the top of Lower Bed II and the basal part of Middle Bed II, Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania. The site was originally excavated in the early 1970s by Mary Leakey, but the excavations and resulting lithic and fossil assemblages were never described. Here we report for the first time on the lithic and fossil assemblages that were recovered by Mary Leakey from the site. The lithic assemblage is one of the largest of any Oldowan site and is characterized by a core-and-flake technology with simple flaking techniques and minimal reduction of cores...
July 26, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28712471/early-pliocene-anuran-fossils-from-kanapoi-kenya-and-the-first-fossil%C3%A2-record-for-the-african-burrowing-frog-hemisus-neobatrachia-hemisotidae
#15
Massimo Delfino
Isolated amphibian bones from the early Pliocene of Kanapoi (West Turkana, Kenya) help to improve the scarce fossil record of the late Neogene and Quaternary amphibians from East Africa. All currently available 579 bones are referable exclusively to the Anura (frogs and toads). More than half of the remains (366) are identified as Hemisus cf. Hemisus marmoratus, an extant species that still inhabits Kenya, but apparently not the northwest of the country and the Turkana area in particular. The rest of the remains are identified simply as Anura indet...
July 13, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28874276/the-costal-remains-of-the-el-sidr%C3%A3-n-neanderthal-site-asturias-northern-spain-and-their-importance-for-understanding-neanderthal-thorax-morphology
#16
Daniel García-Martínez, Markus Bastir, Rosa Huguet, Almudena Estalrrich, Antonio García-Tabernero, Luis Ríos, Eugenia Cunha, Marco de la Rasilla, Antonio Rosas
The study of the Neanderthal thorax has attracted the attention of the scientific community for more than a century. It is agreed that Neanderthals have a more capacious thorax than modern humans, but whether this was caused by a medio-lateral or an antero-posterior expansion of the thorax is still debated, and is key to understanding breathing biomechanics and body shape in Neanderthals. The fragile nature of ribs, the metameric structure of the thorax and difficulties in quantifying thorax morphology all contribute to uncertainty regarding precise aspects of Neanderthal thoracic shape...
October 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28874275/paleolithic-subsistence-strategies-and-changes-in-site-use-at-klissoura-cave-1-peloponnese-greece
#17
Britt M Starkovich
Klissoura Cave 1 in southern Greece preserves a long archaeological sequence that spans roughly 90,000 years and includes Middle Paleolithic, Uluzzian, Upper Paleolithic, and Mesolithic deposits. The site provides a unique opportunity to examine diachronic change and shifts in the intensity of site use across the Late Pleistocene. There is an overall picture of the intensified use of faunal resources at the site, evidenced by a shift from large to small game, and to small fast-moving taxa in particular. This trend is independent of climatic change and fluctuations in site use, and most likely reflects a broader, regional growth of hominin populations...
October 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28874274/evidence-of-neanderthals-in-the-balkans-the-infant-radius-from-kozarnika-cave-bulgaria
#18
Anne-Marie Tillier, Nikolay Sirakov, Aleta Guadelli, Philippe Fernandez, Svoboda Sirakova, Irena Dimitrova, Catherine Ferrier, Guillaume Guérin, Maryam Heidari, Ivailo Krumov, Jean-Claude Leblanc, Viviana Miteva, Vasil Popov, Stanimira Taneva, Jean-Luc Guadelli
Excavations conducted by a Bulgarian-French team at Kozarnika Cave (Balkans, Bulgaria) during several seasons yielded a long Paleolithic archaeological sequence and led to the discovery of important faunal, lithic, and human samples. This paper aims to describe the unpublished radius shaft of an infant who died approximately before the sixth month postnatal that was recovered from layer 10b, which contained East Balkan Levallois Mousterian with bifacial leaf points. The layer was dated between 130 and 200 ka (large mammals biochronology) and between 128 ± 13 ka and 183 ± 14 ka (OSL), i...
October 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28874273/early-hominin-landscape-use-in-the-lower-omo-valley-ethiopia-insights-from-the-taphonomical-analysis-of-oldowan-occurrences-in%C3%A2-the-shungura-formation-member-f
#19
Tiphaine Maurin, Pascal Bertran, Anne Delagnes, Jean-Renaud Boisserie
The Oldowan archeological record of the Shungura Formation, Member F (Lower Omo valley, Ethiopia) comprises more than one hundred occurrences distributed within archeological complexes, where multiple small spots were found in association with one or two larger occurrences. Such spatial patterning could reflect hominin spatial behavior, repeated occupations within a single sedimentary unit, or taphonomic and/or collection biases. Here we test these hypotheses by way of a geoarcheological and taphonomical analysis using four criteria to assess the preservation of the lithic assemblages: (1) size composition, (2) artifact abrasion, (3) bone abrasion, and (4) orientations of lithic artifacts and bones (i...
October 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28874272/postcrania-of-the-most-primitive-euprimate-and-implications-for-primate-origins
#20
Doug M Boyer, Séverine Toussaint, Marc Godinot
The fossil record of early primates is largely comprised of dentitions. While teeth can indicate phylogenetic relationships and dietary preferences, they say little about hypotheses pertaining to the positional behavior or substrate preference of the ancestral crown primate. Here we report the discovery of a talus bone of the dentally primitive fossil euprimate Donrussellia provincialis. Our comparisons and analyses indicate that this talus is more primitive than that of other euprimates. It lacks features exclusive to strepsirrhines, like a large medial tibial facet and a sloping fibular facet...
October 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
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