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Journal of Experimental Biology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29776999/stumbling-corrective-reaction-elicited-by-mechanical-and-electrical-stimulation-of-the-saphenous-nerve-in-walking-mice
#1
William Paganini Mayer, Turgay Akay
The ability to walk around in a natural environment requires the capacity to cope with unexpected obstacles that may disrupt locomotion. One such mechanism is called the stumbling corrective reaction (SCR) that enables animals to step over obstacles that would otherwise disturb the progression of swing movement. Here we use in vivo motion analysis and physiological recording techniques to describe the SCR in mice. We show that SCR can be elicited consistently in mice during locomotion by inserting an obstacle along the path of leg movement during swing phase...
May 18, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29776998/visual-field-shape-and-foraging-ecology-in-diurnal-raptors
#2
Simon Potier, Olivier Duriez, Gregory B Cunningham, Vincent Bonhomme, Colleen O'Rourke, Esteban Fernández-Juricic, Francesco Bonadonna
Birds, particularly raptors, are believed to forage primarily using visual cues. However, raptor foraging tactics are highly diverse - from chasing mobile prey to scavenging - which may reflect adaptations of their visual systems. To investigate this, we studied the visual field configuration of 15 species of diurnal Accipitriformes that differ in such tactics, first focusing on the binocular field and blind area by using a single traits approach, and then exploring the shape of the binocular field with morphometric approaches...
May 18, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29776997/turning-workers-into-false-queens-the-role-of-exogenous-pheromones-in-regulating-reproduction-in-worker-honey-bees
#3
Abdullahi A Yusuf, Robin M Crewe, Christian W W Pirk
One of the responses that honey bee workers can make in the event of queen loss is to develop into false queens. False queens are workers that exhibit both behavioural and physiological traits similar to those of a true queen. However, the presence of more than one false queen in a colony distorts the established hierarchies. As transformation into a false queen occurs after emergence as an adult, we tested the effect of worker mobile pheromone carriers (PCs) treated with exogenously supplied pheromones on their nestmates...
May 18, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29776996/effects-of-chronic-exposure-to-12%C3%A2-saltwater-on-the-endocrine-physiology-of-juvenile-american-alligator-alligator-mississippiensis
#4
P C Faulkner, M L Burleson, L Simonitis, C Marshall, D Hala, L H Petersen
American alligator ( Alligator mississippiensis , Linnaeus) habitats are prone to saltwater intrusion following major storms, hurricanes or droughts. Anthropogenic impacts affecting hydrology of freshwater systems may exacerbate saltwater intrusion into freshwater habitats. The endocrine system of alligators is susceptible to changes in the environment but it is currently not known how the crocodilian physiological system responds to environmental stressors such as salinity. Juvenile alligators were exposed to 12‰ saltwater for 5 weeks to determine effects of chronic exposure to saline environments...
May 18, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29776995/kinematic-control-of-male-allen-s-hummingbird-wing-trill-over-a-range-of-flight-speeds
#5
Christopher J Clark, Emily A Mistick
Wing trills are pulsed sounds produced by modified wing feathers at one or more specific points in time during a wingbeat. Male Allen's Hummingbird ( Selasphorus sasin ) produce a sexually dimorphic 9 kHz wing trill in flight. Here we investigate the kinematic basis for trill production. The wingtip velocity hypothesis posits that trill production is modulated by the airspeed of the wingtip at some point during the wingbeat, whereas the wing rotation hypothesis posits that trill production is instead modulated by wing rotation kinematics...
May 18, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29776994/first-demonstration-of-olfactory-learning-and-long-term-memory-in-honey-bee-queens
#6
Zhiwen Gong, Ken Tan, James C Nieh
As the primary source of colony reproduction, social insect queens play a vital role. However, the cognitive abilities of queens are not well understood, although queen learning and memory are essential in multiple species such as honey bees, in which virgin queens must leave the nest and then successful learn to navigate back over repeated nuptial flights. Honey bee queen learning has never been previously demonstrated. We therefore tested olfactory learning in queens and workers and examined the role of DNA methylation, which plays a key role in long term memory formation...
May 18, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29773686/drivers-of-the-dive-response-in-pinnipeds-apnea-submergence-or-temperature
#7
Jeppe Kaczmarek, Colleen Reichmuth, Birgitte I McDonald, Jakob H Kristensen, Josefin Larson, Fredrik Johansson, Jenna L Sullivan, Peter T Madsen
Long and deep dives in marine mammals are enabled by high mass-specific oxygen stores and the dive response (DR), which reduces oxygen consumption in concert with increased peripheral vasoconstriction and a lowered heart rate during dives. Diving heart rates of pinnipeds are highly variable and modulated by many factors, such as breath holding (apnea), pressure, swimming activity, temperature, and even cognitive control. However, the individual effects of these factors on diving heart rate are poorly understood due to the difficulty of parsing their relative contributions in diving pinnipeds...
May 17, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29773685/simulated-work-loops-predict-maximal-human-cycling-power
#8
James C Martin, Jennifer A Nichols
Fish, birds, and lizards sometimes perform locomotor activities with maximized muscle power. Whether humans maximize muscular power is unknown because current experimental techniques cannot be applied non-invasively. This study uses simulated muscle work loops to examine whether voluntary maximal cycling is characterized by maximized muscle power. The simulated work loops leverage experimentally measured joint angles, anatomically realistic muscle parameters (muscle-tendon lengths, velocities, and moment arms), and a published muscle model to calculate powers and forces for thirty-eight muscles...
May 17, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29773684/when-fed-foods-with-similar-palatability-healthy-adult-dogs-and-cats-choose-different-macronutrient-compositions
#9
Jean A Hall, Jodi C Vondran, Melissa A Vanchina, Dennis E Jewell
Dogs and cats make short-term food choices based on palatability. We hypothesized that if palatability were masked, long-term food choices would be based on physiologic requirements, and circulating metabolite concentrations would reflect those choices. Four experimental foods with similar palatability, but varying in macronutrient composition, were prepared for healthy adult dogs (n=17) and cats (n=27). Food 1 was high protein; Food 2 was high fat; Food 3 was high carbohydrates; and Food 4 was balanced for macronutrients...
May 17, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29773683/adaptive-control-of-dynamic-balance-in-human-gait-on-a-split-belt-treadmill
#10
Tom J W Buurke, Claudine J C Lamoth, Danique Vervoort, Lucas H V van der Woude, Rob den Otter
Human bipedal gait is inherently unstable and staying upright requires adaptive control of dynamic balance. Little is known about adaptive control of dynamic balance in reaction to long-term, continuous perturbations. We examined how dynamic balance control adapts to a continuous perturbation in gait, by letting people walk faster with one leg than the other on a treadmill with two belts (i.e. split-belt walking). In addition, we assessed whether changes in mediolateral dynamic balance control coincide with changes in energy use during split-belt adaptation...
May 17, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29748217/maternally-derived-yolk-antioxidants-buffer-the-developing-avian-embryo-against-oxidative-stress-induced-by-hyperoxia
#11
Hannah Watson, Pablo Salmón, Caroline Isaksson
In oviparous animals, maternally transferred antioxidants protect the embryo from oxidative damage from high rates of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production incurred by rapid growth. Elevated ROS exposure - beyond that incurred by normal growth - can occur as a result of exposure to exogenous factors (e.g. pollutants, toxins, radiation), increasing the risk of oxidative damage, with potentially adverse consequences for embryonic development and long-term fitness. The capacity of the avian embryo's antioxidant protection system to counter an increased exogenous oxidative threat is poorly understood...
May 10, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29748216/intrinsic-anti-inflammatory-properties-in-the-serum-of-two-species-of-deep-diving-seal
#12
Aranya Bagchi, Annabelle J Batten, Milton Levin, Kaitlin N Allen, Michael L Fitzgerald, Luis A Hückstädt, Daniel P Costa, Emmanuel S Buys, Allyson G Hindle
Weddell and elephant seals are deep diving mammals, which rely on lung collapse to limit nitrogen absorption and prevent decompression injury. Repeated collapse and re-expansion exposes the lungs to multiple stressors, including ischemia/reperfusion, alveolar shear stress, and inflammation. There is no evidence, however, that diving damages pulmonary function in these species. To investigate potential protective strategies in deep-diving seals, we examined the inflammatory response of seal whole blood exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a potent endotoxin...
May 10, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29748215/high-resting-metabolic-rates-with-low-thermal-dependence-induce-active-dives-in-overwintering-pacific-juvenile-loggerhead-turtles
#13
Chihiro Kinoshita, Takuya Fukuoka, Yasuaki Niizuma, Tomoko Narazaki, Katsufumi Sato
The metabolic rate and activity of sea turtles generally decreases with decreasing seasonal ambient temperature. Juvenile loggerhead turtles in the Mediterranean Sea made prolonged inactive dives (>400 min), indicating a state of dormancy during the cold winter period. However, seasonal differences in dive duration were not detected in juvenile loggerheads in the western North Pacific, even though the ambient water temperature changed by more than 10°C. Thus, metabolic states might differ among populations, explaining differences in the diving behaviour of juveniles during winter...
May 10, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29748214/environmental-history-impacts-gene-expression-during-diapause-development-in-the-alfalfa-leafcutting-bee-megachile-rotundata
#14
George D Yocum, Anna K Childers, Joseph P Rinehart, Arun Rajamohan, Theresa L Pitts-Singer, Kendra J Greenlee, Julia H Bowsher
Our understanding of the mechanisms controlling insect diapause has increased dramatically with the introduction of global gene expression techniques, such as RNA-seq. However, little attention has been given to how ecologically relevant field conditions may affect gene expression during diapause development because previous studies have focused on laboratory reared and maintained insects. To determine whether gene expression differs between laboratory and field conditions, prepupae of the alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata , entering diapause early or late in the growing season were collected...
May 10, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29748213/time-optimized-path-choice-in-the-termite-hunting-ant-megaponera-analis
#15
Erik T Frank, Philipp O Hönle, K Eduard Linsenmair
Trail network systems among ants have received a lot of scientific attention due to their various applications in problem solving of networks. Recent studies have shown that ants select the fastest available path when facing different velocities on different substrates, rather than the shortest distance. The progress of decision-making by these ants is determined by pheromone-based maintenance of paths, which is a collective decision. However, path optimization through individual decision-making remains mostly unexplored...
May 10, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29739834/the-sea-urchin-diadema-africanum-uses-low-resolution-vision-to-find-shelter-and-deter-enemies
#16
John D Kirwan, Michael J Bok, Jochen Smolka, James J Foster, José Carlos Hernández, Dan-Eric Nilsson
Many sea urchins can detect light on their body surface and some species are reported to possess image-resolving vision. Here we measure the spatial resolution of vision in the long-spined sea urchin Diadema africanum , using two different visual responses: a taxis towards dark objects and an alarm response of spine-pointing towards looming stimuli. For the taxis response we used visual stimuli, which were isoluminant to the background, to discriminate spatial vision from phototaxis. Individual animals were placed in the centre of a cylindrical arena under bright down-welling light, with stimuli of varying angular width placed on the arena wall at pseudorandom directions from the centre...
May 8, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29739833/central-nervous-shutdown-underlies-acute-cold-tolerance-in-tropical-and-temperate-drosophila-species
#17
Mads Kuhlmann Andersen, Nikolaj Johannes Skole Jensen, R Meldrum Robertson, Johannes Overgaard
When cooled, insects first lose their ability to perform coordinated movements (CTmin ) after which they enter chill coma (chill coma onset, CCO). Both these behaviours are popular measures of cold tolerance that correlate remarkably well with species distribution. To identify and understand the neuromuscular impairment that causes CTmin and CCO we used inter- and intraspecific model systems of Drosophila species that have varying cold tolerance as a consequence of adaptation or cold acclimation. Our results demonstrate that CTmin and CCO correlate strongly with a spreading depolarization (SD) within the central nervous system (CNS)...
May 8, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29739832/expression-of-calcium-channel-transcripts-in-the-zebrafish-heart-dominance-of-t-type-channels
#18
Jaakko Haverinen, Minna Hassinen, Surjya Narayan Dash, Matti Vornanen
Calcium (Ca) channels are necessary for cardiac excitation-contraction (e-c) coupling, but Ca channel composition of fish hearts is still largely unknown. To this end, we determined transcript expression of Ca channels in the heart of zebrafish ( Danio rerio ), a popular model species. Altogether 18 Ca channel α-subunit genes were expressed in both atrium and ventricle. Transcripts for 7 L-type (Cav1.1a, Cav1.1b, Cav1.2, Cav1.3a, Cav1.3b, Cav1.4a, Cav1.4b), 5 T-type (Cav3.1, Cav3.2a, Cav3.2b, Cav3.3a, Cav3...
May 8, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29739831/selection-for-relative-brain-size-affects-context-dependent-male-preferences-but-not-discrimination-of-female-body-size-in-guppies
#19
Alberto Corral-López, Alexander Kotrschal, Niclas Kolm
Understanding what drives animal decisions is fundamental in evolutionary biology, and mate choice decisions are arguably some of the most important decisions in any individual's life. As cognitive ability can impact decision-making, elucidating the link between mate choice and cognitive ability is necessary to fully understand mate choice. To experimentally study this link, we used guppies (Poecilia reticulata) artificially selected for divergence in relative brain size and with previously demonstrated differences in cognitive ability...
May 8, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724777/the-analysis-and-interpretation-of-critical-temperatures
#20
Joel G Kingsolver, James Umbanhowar
Critical temperatures are widely used to quantify the upper and lower thermal limits of organisms. But measured critical temperatures often vary with methodological details, leading to spirited discussions about the potential consequences of stress and acclimation during the experiments. We review a model based on the simple assumption that failure rate increases with increasing temperature, independent of previous temperature exposure, water loss or metabolism during the experiment. The model predicts that mean critical thermal maximal temperatures ( CT max ) increases nonlinearly with starting temperature and ramping rate, a pattern frequently observed in empirical studies...
May 3, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
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