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Journal of Experimental Biology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432155/interactive-effects-of-oxygen-carbon-dioxide-and-flow-on-photosynthesis-and-respiration-in-the-scleractinian-coral-galaxea-fascicularis
#1
Ronald Osinga, Marlous Derksen-Hooijberg, Tim Wijgerde, Johan A J Verreth
Rates of dark respiration and net photosynthesis were measured on six replicate clonal fragments of the stony coral Galaxea fascicularis (Linnaeus 1767), which were incubated under twelve different combinations of dissolved oxygen (20%, 100% and 150% saturation), dissolved carbon dioxide (9.5 and 19.1 μmol L(-1)) and water flow (1-1.6 cm s(-1) versus 4-13 cm s(-1)) in a repeated measures design. Dark respiration was enhanced by increased flow and increased oxygen saturation in an interactive way, which relates to improved oxygen influx into the coral tissue...
April 21, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432154/identification-of-the-septate-junction-protein-gliotactin-in-the-mosquito-aedes-aegypti-evidence-for-a-role-in-increased-paracellular-permeability-in-larvae
#2
Sima Jonusaite, Scott P Kelly, Andrew Donini
Septate junctions (SJs) regulate paracellular permeability across invertebrate epithelia. However, little is known about the function of SJ proteins in aquatic invertebrates. In this study, a role for the transmembrane SJ protein gliotactin (Gli) in the osmoregulatory strategies of larval mosquito (Aedes aegypti) was examined. Differences in gli transcript abundance were observed between the midgut, Malpighian tubules (MT), hindgut and anal papillae (AP) of A. aegypti, which are epithelia that participate in larval mosquito osmoregulation...
April 21, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432153/comparison-of-functional-and-anatomical-estimations-of-visual-acuity-in-two-species-of-coral-reef-fish
#3
Amira N Parker, Kerstin A Fritsches, Cait Newport, Guy Wallis, Ulrike E Siebeck
The high contrast, complex patterns typical of many reef fish serve several purposes, including providing disruptive camouflage and a basis for vision-based communication. In trying to understand the role of a specific pattern it is important to first assess the extent to which an observer can resolve the pattern, itself determined, at least in part, by the observer's visual acuity. In this study, we study the visual acuity of two species of reef fish using both anatomical and behavioural estimates. The two species in question share a common habitat but are members of different trophic levels (predator vs...
April 21, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432152/exposure-to-seawater-increases-intestinal-motility-in-euryhaline-rainbow-trout-oncorhynchus-mykiss
#4
Jeroen Brijs, Grant W Hennig, Albin Gräns, Esmée Dekens, Michael Axelsson, Catharina Olsson
Upon exposure to seawater, euryhaline teleosts need to imbibe and desalinate seawater to allow for intestinal ion and water absorption, as this is essential for maintaining osmotic homeostasis. Despite the potential benefits of increased mixing and transport of imbibed water for increasing the efficiency of absorptive processes, the effect of water salinity on intestinal motility in teleosts remains unexplored. By qualitatively and quantitatively describing in vivo intestinal motility of euryhaline rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), this study demonstrates that in freshwater, the most common motility pattern consisted of clusters of rhythmic, posteriorly propagating contractions that lasted ∼1-2 minutes followed by a period of quiescence lasting ∼4-5 minutes...
April 21, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432151/dehydration-enhances-multiple-physiological-defense-mechanisms-in-a-desert-lizard-heloderma-suspectum
#5
Karla T Moeller, Guillaume Demare, Scott Davies, Dale F DeNardo
The physiological challenges associated with dehydration can induce an increase in plasma glucocorticoid concentrations, a response thought to provide the mechanism for dehydration suppressing immune function. However, a comprehensive examination of the interrelationship of dehydration, stress, and immune function has not been conducted within a single species. We previously demonstrated that Gila monsters (Heloderma suspectum), which inhabit a xeric environment with a predictable seasonal drought, have enhanced measures of innate immunity when dehydrated...
April 21, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432150/specialist-generalist-model-of-body-temperature-regulation-can-be-applied-on-the-intraspecific-level
#6
Anna S Przybylska, Jan S Boratyński, Michał S Wojciechowski, Małgorzata Jefimow
According to theoretical predictions endothermic homeotherms can be classified as either thermal specialists and thermal generalists. In high cost environments thermal specialists are supposed to be more prone to use facultative heterothermy than generalists. We tested this hypothesis on the intraspecific level using laboratory male mice (C57BL/cmdb) fasted under different thermal conditions (20 and 10°C), and for different time periods (12-48 h). We predicted that variability of body temperature (Tb) and time spent with Tb below normothermy increase with the increase of environmental demands (duration of fasting and cold)...
April 21, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28420657/a-neural-basis-for-password-based-species-recognition-in-an-avian-brood-parasite
#7
Kathleen S Lynch, Annmarie Gaglio, Elizabeth Tyler, Joseph Coculo, Matthew I M Louder, Mark E Hauber
Obligate avian brood parasites are raised by heterospecific hosts and therefore, lack critical early exposure to relatives and other conspecifics. Yet, young brood parasites readily recognize and affiliate with others of their own species upon independence. One solution to this social recognition paradox is the ontogenetic password mechanism utilized by obligate parasitic brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater), whereby conspecific identification is initially mediated through the cowbird chatter, a non-learned vocal cue...
April 18, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28404730/not-flying-blind-a-comparative-study-of-photoreceptor-function-in-flying-and-non-flying-cockroaches
#8
Roman V Frolov, Atsuko Matsushita, Kentaro Arikawa
Flying is often associated with superior visual performance since good vision is crucial for detection and implementation of rapid visually-guided aerial movements. To understand the evolution of insect visual systems it is therefore important to compare phylogenetically related species with different investments into flight capability. Here, we describe and compare morphological and electrophysiological properties of photoreceptors from the habitually flying green cockroach Panchlora nivea, and the American cockroach Periplaneta americana, which flies only at high ambient temperatures...
April 12, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28404729/wings-as-impellers-honey-bees-co-opt-flight-system-to-induce-nest-ventilation-and-disperse-pheromones
#9
Jacob M Peters, Nick Gravish, Stacey A Combes
Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are remarkable fliers that regularly carry heavy loads of nectar and pollen, supported by a flight system - the wings, thorax and flight muscles - that one might assume is optimized for aerial locomotion. However, honey bees also use this system to perform other crucial tasks that are unrelated to flight. When ventilating the nest, bees grip the surface of the comb or nest entrance and fan their wings to drive airflow through the nest, and a similar wing-fanning behavior is used to disperse volatile pheromones from the Nasonov gland...
April 12, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28404728/costs-of-immunity-and-their-role-in-the-range-expansion-of-the-house-sparrow-in-kenya
#10
Lynn B Martin, Holly J Kilvitis, Amber J Brace, Laken Cooper, Mark F Haussmann, Alex Mutati, Vincent Fasanello, Sara O'Brien, Daniel R Ardia
There are at least two reasons to study traits that mediate successful range expansions. First, dispersers will found new populations and thus impact the distribution and evolution of species. Second, organisms moving into new areas will influence the fate of resident communities, directly competing with or indirectly affecting residents by spreading non-native or spilling-back native parasites. The success of invaders in new areas is likely mediated by a counterbalancing of costly traits. In new areas where threats are comparatively rare, individuals that grow rapidly and breed prolifically should be at an advantage...
April 12, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28404727/when-less-means-more-dehydration-improves-innate-immunity-in-rattlesnakes
#11
George A Brusch, Dale F DeNardo
Immune function can vary based on availability of resources, and most studies of such influences have focused on the co-investment of energy into immune and other physiological functions. When energy resources are limited, trade-offs exist, which can compromise immunity for other functions. As with energy, water limitation can also alter various physiological processes, yet water has received little consideration for its role in possibly modulating immune functions. We examined the relationship between immunocompetence and hydration state using the western diamond-backed rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox)...
April 12, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28396357/nanofibre-production-in-spiders-without-electric-charge
#12
Anna-Christin Joel, Werner Baumgartner
Technical nanofibre production is linked to high voltage, because they are typically produced by electrospinning. Spiders on the contrary have evolved a way to produce nanofibres without high voltage. These spiders are called cribellate spiders and produce nanofibres within their capture thread production. It is suggested that their nanofibres are frictionally charged when being brushed over a continuous area on the calamistrum, a comb-like structure at the metatarsus of the fourth leg. Although there are indications that electrostatic charges are involved in the formation of the threads structure, final proof is missing...
April 10, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28396356/sustained-energy-intake-in-lactating-swiss-mice-a-dual-modulation-process
#13
Jing Wen, Song Tan, Qing-Gang Qiao, Wei-Jia Fan, Yi-Xin Huang, Jing Cao, Jin-Song Liu, Zuo-Xin Wang, Zhi-Jun Zhao
Limits to sustained energy intake (SusEI) during lactation are important because they provide an upper boundary below which females must trade-off competing physiological activities. To date, SusEI is thought to be limited either by the capacity of the mammary glands to produce milk (the peripheral limitation hypothesis), or by a female's ability to dissipate body heat (the heat dissipation hypothesis). In the present study, we examined the effects of litter size and ambient temperature on a set of physiological, behavioral, and morphological indicators of SusEI and reproductive performance in lactating Swiss mice...
April 10, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28396355/nutrients-intake-determines-the-post-maturity-molting-in-the-golden-orb-web-spider-nephila-pilipes-araneae-nephilidae
#14
Ren-Chung Cheng, Shichang Zhang, Yu-Chun Chen, Chia-Yi Lee, Yi-Ling Chou, Hui-Ying Ye, Dakota Piorkowski, Chen-Pan Liao, I-Min Tso
While molting occurs in the development of many animals especially in arthropods, post-maturity molting (PMM, organisms continue to molt after sexual maturity) has received little attention. Mechanism of molting has been studied intensively, however, the mechanism of PMM remains unknown although it is suggested to be crucial for the development of body size. In this study, we investigated factors that potentially induce PMM in the golden orb-web spider Nephila pilipes, which has the greatest degree of sexual dimorphism among terrestrial animals...
April 10, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28396354/functional-diversity-of-the-lateral-line-system-among-populations-of-a-native-australian-freshwater-fish
#15
Lindsey Spiller, Pauline F Grierson, Peter M Davies, Jan Hemmi, Shaun P Collin, Jennifer L Kelley
Fishes use their mechanoreceptive lateral line system to sense nearby objects by detecting slight fluctuations in hydrodynamic motion within their immediate environment. Species of fishes from different habitats often display specialisations of the lateral line system, in particular the distribution and abundance of neuromasts, but the lateral line can also exhibit considerable diversity within a species. Here, we provide the first investigation of the lateral line system of the Australian western rainbowfish (Melanotaenia australis), a species that occupies a diversity of freshwater habitats across semi-arid northwest Australia...
April 10, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28385799/cross-modal-influence-of-mechanosensory-input-on-gaze-responses-to-visual-motion-in-drosophila
#16
Shwetha Mureli, Ilakkiya Thanigaivelan, Michael L Schaffer, Jessica L Fox
Animals typically combine inertial and visual information to stabilize their gaze against confounding self-generated visual motion, and to maintain a level gaze when the body is perturbed by external forces. In vertebrates, an inner ear vestibular system provides information about body rotations and accelerations, but gaze stabilization is less understood in insects, which lack a vestibular organ. In flies, the halteres, reduced hindwings imbued with hundreds of mechanosensory cells, sense inertial forces and provide input to neck motoneurons that control gaze...
April 6, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28385798/visual-acuity-and-signal-color-pattern-in-an-anolis-lizard
#17
Leo J Fleishman, Anna I Yeo, Carley W Perez
Anolis lizards communicate with colorful dewlaps that often include detailed patterns. We measured the visual acuity of Anolis sagrei. Lizards viewed a checkerboard pattern of red and yellow-green squares that were too small to resolve, and thus appeared uniform in color. We quickly replaced the center portion of the display with a pattern of larger squares. If the new pattern could be resolved, the lizards perceived a change in color and reflexively shifted gaze toward the target. The acuity threshold was 1...
April 6, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28381582/effect-of-temperature-and-food-restriction-on-immune-function-in-striped-hamsters-cricetulus-barabensis
#18
De-Li Xu, Xiao-Kai Hu, Yu-Fen Tian
Small mammals in the temperate area face seasonal fluctuations of temperature and food availability, both of which may influence their immune responses being critical to the survival. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that low temperature and food restriction would suppress immune function in striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis). Thirty-seven adult male hamsters were randomly assigned into the warm (23±1°C) and the cold (5±1°C) groups, which were further divided into the fed and the food restricted groups, respectively...
April 5, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28373599/kidney-morphology-and-candidate-gene-expression-shows-plasticity-in-sticklebacks-adapted-to-divergent-osmotic-environments
#19
M Mehedi Hasan, Jacquelin DeFaveri, Satu Kuure, Surjya N Dash, Sanna Lehtonen, Juha Merilä, R J Scott McCairns
Novel physiological challenges in different environments can promote the evolution of divergent phenotypes, either through plastic or genetic changes. Environmental salinity serves as a key barrier to the distribution of nearly all aquatic organisms, and species diversification is likely to be enabled by adaptation to alternative osmotic environments. The threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) is a euryhaline species with populations found both in marine and freshwater environments. It has evolved both highly plastic and locally adapted phenotypes due to salinity-derived selection, but the physiological and genetic basis of adaptation to salinity is not fully understood...
April 3, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28373598/raccoon-dog-model-shows-preservation-of-bone-during-prolonged-catabolism-and-reduced-physical-activity
#20
Anne-Mari J Mustonen, Mikko A J Finnilä, Katri S Puukka, Timo J Jämsä, Simo Saarakkala, Juha K Tuukkanen, T Petteri Nieminen
The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is a promising animal model capable of preventing disuse-induced osteoporosis. Previous data suggest that this species resembles bears in the preservation of bone mass and biomechanical properties during prolonged passivity and catabolism. This longitudinal study examined the osteological properties of tibiae in farm-bred raccoon dogs that were either fed or fasted (n=6/group) for a 10-week period. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography was utilized and plasma markers of bone turnover measured before fasting and at 9 weeks followed by mechanical testing (three-point bending), micro-computed tomography and Fourier transform infrared imaging at 10 weeks...
April 3, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
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