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Cognitive Psychology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29454819/some-inferences-still-take-time-prosody-predictability-and-the-speed-of-scalar-implicatures
#1
Yi Ting Huang, Jesse Snedeker
Experimental pragmatics has gained many insights from understanding how people use weak scalar terms (like some) to infer that a stronger alternative (like all) is false. Early studies found that comprehenders initially interpret some without an upper bound, but later results suggest that this inference is sometimes immediate (e.g., Grodner, Klein, Carbary, & Tanenhaus, 2010). The present paper explores whether rapid inferencing depends on the prosody (i.e., summa rather than some of) or predictability of referring expressions (e...
February 15, 2018: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29407637/planning-to-speak-in-l1-and-l2
#2
Agnieszka E Konopka, Antje Meyer, Tess A Forest
The leading theories of sentence planning - Hierarchical Incrementality and Linear Incrementality - differ in their assumptions about the coordination of processes that map preverbal information onto language. Previous studies showed that, in native (L1) speakers, this coordination can vary with the ease of executing the message-level and sentence-level processes necessary to plan and produce an utterance. We report the first series of experiments to systematically examine how linguistic experience influences sentence planning in native (L1) speakers (i...
January 25, 2018: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29358094/how-people-learn-about-causal-influence-when-there-are-many-possible-causes-a-model-based-on-informative-transitions
#3
Cory Derringer, Benjamin Margolin Rottman
Four experiments tested how people learn cause-effect relations when there are many possible causes of an effect. When there are many cues, even if all the cues together strongly predict the effect, the bivariate relation between each individual cue and the effect can be weak, which can make it difficult to detect the influence of each cue. We hypothesized that when detecting the influence of a cue, in addition to learning from the states of the cues and effect (e.g., a cue is present and the effect is present), which is hypothesized by multiple existing theories of learning, participants would also learn from transitions - how the cues and effect change over time (e...
January 19, 2018: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29331899/the-speed-of-memory-errors-shows-the-influence-of-misleading-information-testing-the-diffusion-model-and-discrete-state-models
#4
Jeffrey J Starns, Chad Dubé, Matthew E Frelinger
In this report, we evaluate single-item and forced-choice recognition memory for the same items and use the resulting accuracy and reaction time data to test the predictions of discrete-state and continuous models. For the single-item trials, participants saw a word and indicated whether or not it was studied on a previous list. The forced-choice trials had one studied and one non-studied word that both appeared in the earlier single-item trials and both received the same response. Thus, forced-choice trials always had one word with a previous correct response and one with a previous error...
January 11, 2018: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29328949/conditionals-and-inferential-connections-a-hypothetical-inferential-theory
#5
Igor Douven, Shira Elqayam, Henrik Singmann, Janneke van Wijnbergen-Huitink
Intuition suggests that for a conditional to be evaluated as true, there must be some kind of connection between its component clauses. In this paper, we formulate and test a new psychological theory to account for this intuition. We combined previous semantic and psychological theorizing to propose that the key to the intuition is a relevance-driven, satisficing-bounded inferential connection between antecedent and consequent. To test our theory, we created a novel experimental paradigm in which participants were presented with a soritical series of objects, notably colored patches (Experiments 1 and 4) and spheres (Experiment 2), or both (Experiment 3), and were asked to evaluate related conditionals embodying non-causal inferential connections (such as "If patch number 5 is blue, then so is patch number 4")...
January 9, 2018: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29310002/young-infants-expect-an-unfamiliar-adult-to-comfort-a-crying-baby-evidence-from-a-standard-violation-of-expectation-task-and-a-novel-infant-triggered-video-task
#6
Kyong-Sun Jin, Jessica L Houston, Renée Baillargeon, Ashley M Groh, Glenn I Roisman
Do infants expect individuals to act prosocially toward others in need, at least in some contexts? Very few such expectations have been uncovered to date. In three experiments, we examined whether infants would expect an adult alone in a scene with a crying baby to attempt to comfort the baby. In the first two experiments, 12- and 4-month-olds were tested using the standard violation-of-expectation method. Infants saw videotaped events in which a woman was performing a household chore when a baby nearby began to cry; the woman either comforted (comfort event) or ignored (ignore event) the baby...
January 5, 2018: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29294373/the-detour-problem-in-a-stochastic-environment-tolman-revisited
#7
Pegah Fakhari, Arash Khodadadi, Jerome R Busemeyer
We designed a grid world task to study human planning and re-planning behavior in an unknown stochastic environment. In our grid world, participants were asked to travel from a random starting point to a random goal position while maximizing their reward. Because they were not familiar with the environment, they needed to learn its characteristics from experience to plan optimally. Later in the task, we randomly blocked the optimal path to investigate whether and how people adjust their original plans to find a detour...
December 30, 2017: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29272732/a-neural-model-of-retrospective-attention-in-visual-working-memory
#8
Paul M Bays, Robert Taylor
An informative cue that directs attention to one of several items in working memory improves subsequent recall of that item. Here we examine the mechanism of this retro-cue effect using a model of short-term memory based on neural population coding. Our model describes recalled feature values as the output of an optimal decoding of spikes generated by a tuned population of neurons. This neural model provides a better account of human recall data than an influential model that assumes errors can be described as a mixture of normally distributed noise and random guesses...
December 19, 2017: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29241033/the-elimination-of-positive-priming-with-increasing-prime-duration-reflects-a-transition-from-perceptual-fluency-to-disfluency-rather-than-bias-against-primed-words
#9
Kevin W Potter, Chris Donkin, David E Huber
With immediate repetition priming of forced choice perceptual identification, short prime durations produce positive priming (i.e., priming the target leads to higher accuracy, while priming the foil leads to lower accuracy). Many theories explain positive priming following short duration primes as reflecting increased perceptual fluency for the primed target (i.e., decreased identification latency). However, most studies only examine either accuracy or response times, rather than considering the joint constraints of response times and accuracy to properly address the role of decision biases and response caution...
December 11, 2017: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29222983/the-action-is-in-the-task-set-not-in-the-action
#10
Maria M Robinson, John Clevenger, David E Irwin
In 7 experiments we contrasted two accounts for novel sources of attentional bias. According to the action-based account, executing a motor response towards an object causes people to allocate attention preferentially towards properties of that object in a subsequent task even when properties of the acted-on object are task irrelevant. This remarkable view entails that motor processing is in itself sufficient to affect later attentional processing, in the absence of stimulus evaluation and motor preparation...
December 6, 2017: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29220640/invariants-in-probabilistic-reasoning
#11
Fintan Costello, Paul Watts
Recent research has identified three invariants or identities that appear to hold in people's probabilistic reasoning: the QQ identity, the addition law identity, and the Bayes rule identity (Costello and Watts, 2014, 2016a, Fisher and Wolfe, 2014, Wang and Busemeyer, 2013, Wang et al., 2014). Each of these identities represent specific agreement with the requirements of normative probability theory; strikingly, these identities seem to hold in people's judgements despite the presence of strong and systematic biases against the requirements of normative probability theory in those very same judgements...
December 6, 2017: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29154187/compositional-inductive-biases-in-function-learning
#12
Eric Schulz, Joshua B Tenenbaum, David Duvenaud, Maarten Speekenbrink, Samuel J Gershman
How do people recognize and learn about complex functional structure? Taking inspiration from other areas of cognitive science, we propose that this is achieved by harnessing compositionality: complex structure is decomposed into simpler building blocks. We formalize this idea within the framework of Bayesian regression using a grammar over Gaussian process kernels, and compare this approach with other structure learning approaches. Participants consistently chose compositional (over non-compositional) extrapolations and interpolations of functions...
November 16, 2017: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132016/children-s-representation-of-abstract-relations-in-relational-array-match-to-sample-tasks
#13
Jean-Rémy Hochmann, Arin S Tuerk, Sophia Sanborn, Rebecca Zhu, Robert Long, Meg Dempster, Susan Carey
Five experiments compared preschool children's performance to that of adults and of non-human animals on match to sample tasks involving 2-item or 16-item arrays that varied according to their composition of same or different items (Array Match-to-Sample, AMTS). They establish that, like non-human animals in most studies, 3- and 4-year-olds fail 2-item AMTS (the classic relational match to sample task introduced into the literature by Premack, 1983), and that robust success is not observed until age 6. They also establish that 3-year-olds, like non-human animal species, succeed only when they are able to encode stimuli in terms of entropy, a property of an array (namely its internal variability), rather than relations among the individuals in the array (same vs...
November 10, 2017: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29031120/enabling-spontaneous-analogy-through-heuristic-change
#14
Thomas C Ormerod, James N MacGregor
Despite analogy playing a central role in theories of problem solving, learning and education, demonstrations of spontaneous analogical transfer are rare. Here, we present a theory of heuristic change for spontaneous analogical transfer, tested in four experiments that manipulated the experience of failure to solve a source problem prior to attempting a target problem. In Experiment 1, participants solved more source problems that contained an additional financial constraint designed to signal the inappropriateness of moves that maximized progress towards the goal...
October 11, 2017: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28881224/accent-modulates-access-to-word-meaning-evidence-for-a-speaker-model-account-of-spoken-word-recognition
#15
Zhenguang G Cai, Rebecca A Gilbert, Matthew H Davis, M Gareth Gaskell, Lauren Farrar, Sarah Adler, Jennifer M Rodd
Speech carries accent information relevant to determining the speaker's linguistic and social background. A series of web-based experiments demonstrate that accent cues can modulate access to word meaning. In Experiments 1-3, British participants were more likely to retrieve the American dominant meaning (e.g., hat meaning of "bonnet") in a word association task if they heard the words in an American than a British accent. In addition, results from a speeded semantic decision task (Experiment 4) and sentence comprehension task (Experiment 5) confirm that accent modulates on-line meaning retrieval such that comprehension of ambiguous words is easier when the relevant word meaning is dominant in the speaker's dialect...
September 4, 2017: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28818276/the-role-of-incremental-parsing-in-syntactically-conditioned-word-learning
#16
Jeffrey Lidz, Aaron Steven White, Rebecca Baier
In a series of three experiments, we use children's noun learning as a probe into their syntactic knowledge as well as their ability to deploy this knowledge, investigating how the predictions children make about upcoming syntactic structure change as their knowledge changes. In the first two experiments, we show that children display a developmental change in their ability to use a noun's syntactic environment as a cue to its meaning. We argue that this pattern arises from children's reliance on their knowledge of verbs' subcategorization frame frequencies to guide parsing, coupled with an inability to revise incremental parsing decisions...
September 2017: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28734172/clear-evidence-for-item-limits-in-visual-working-memory
#17
Kirsten C S Adam, Edward K Vogel, Edward Awh
There is a consensus that visual working memory (WM) resources are sharply limited, but debate persists regarding the simple question of whether there is a limit to the total number of items that can be stored concurrently. Zhang and Luck (2008) advanced this debate with an analytic procedure that provided strong evidence for random guessing responses, but their findings can also be described by models that deny guessing while asserting a high prevalence of low precision memories. Here, we used a whole report memory procedure in which subjects reported all items in each trial and indicated whether they were guessing with each response...
September 2017: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28641208/an-associative-account-of-the-development-of-word-learning
#18
Vladimir M Sloutsky, Hyungwook Yim, Xin Yao, Simon Dennis
Word learning is a notoriously difficult induction problem because meaning is underdetermined by positive examples. How do children solve this problem? Some have argued that word learning is achieved by means of inference: young word learners rely on a number of assumptions that reduce the overall hypothesis space by favoring some meanings over others. However, these approaches have difficulty explaining how words are learned from conversations or text, without pointing or explicit instruction. In this research, we propose an associative mechanism that can account for such learning...
September 2017: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28843070/multi-attribute-multi-alternative-models-of-choice-choice-reaction-time-and-process-tracing
#19
Andrew L Cohen, Namyi Kang, Tanya L Leise
The first aim of this research is to compare computational models of multi-alternative, multi-attribute choice when attribute values are explicit. The choice predictions of utility (standard random utility & weighted valuation), heuristic (elimination-by-aspects, lexicographic, & maximum attribute value), and dynamic (multi-alternative decision field theory, MDFT, & a version of the multi-attribute linear ballistic accumulator, MLBA) models are contrasted on both preferential and risky choice data. Using both maximum likelihood and cross-validation fit measures on choice data, the utility and dynamic models are preferred over the heuristic models for risky choice, with a slight overall advantage for the MLBA for preferential choice...
August 23, 2017: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28830015/putting-old-tools-to-novel-uses-the-role-of-form-accessibility-in-semantic-extension
#20
Zara Harmon, Vsevolod Kapatsinski
An increase in frequency of a form has been argued to result in semantic extension (Bybee, 2003; Zipf, 1949). Yet, research on the acquisition of lexical semantics suggests that a form that frequently co-occurs with a meaning gets restricted to that meaning (Xu & Tenenbaum, 2007). The current work reconciles these positions by showing that - through its effect on form accessibility - frequency causes semantic extension in production, while at the same time causing entrenchment in comprehension. Repeatedly experiencing a form paired with a specific meaning makes one more likely to re-use the form to express related meanings, while also increasing one's confidence that the form is never used to express those meanings...
August 19, 2017: Cognitive Psychology
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