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Journal of Clinical Psychology

Hannah C Levy, Amber L Billingsley, Kristen S Springer, Scott Hannan, Akanksha Das, David F Tolin
OBJECTIVE: The Outcome Questionnaire-45.2 (OQ-45) is a self-report measure of general psychological distress. Although intended to be transdiagnostic, the OQ-45 may be best conceptualized as a measure of depression; as such, its utility in assessing other symptoms such as anxiety is unclear. METHOD: We examined scores on the OQ-45 in a sample of 329 patients with anxiety and related disorders, half of whom had co-occurring depression. RESULTS: Eighty-two percent of patients scored above the OQ-45 cutoff, whereas 18% were incorrectly screened out...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Mary C Vance, Benjamin Kovachy, Melissa Dong, Eric Bui
CONTEXT: Although the subjective trauma exposure criterion was removed from the DSM-5 criteria set for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), emerging literature suggests that peritraumatic distress may be useful in predicting outcomes after exposure to a stressful event. METHOD: We conducted a comprehensive review of the literature examining the association between peritraumatic distress and PTSD and other psychiatric outcomes. The 57 studies herein varied in both experimental design and target populations...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Susan Bodnar
When Donald Trump became president of the United States, I discovered that my clients who identified as Black saw me as a White clinician. With that came a host of nefarious attributions. To preserve therapeutic efficacy, and the genuine relationships with people about whom I cared, I had to distinguish myself from the president; thus, I learned not only how it feels to be seen through the bias of skin color but what I needed to do to identify as a person rather than a White person. "Welcome to my world," said one African American client...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Vivian M Gonzalez, Lucía L Neander
OBJECTIVE: This study examined whether three facets of impulsivity previously shown to be associated with suicidal ideation and attempts (negative urgency, lack of premeditation, and lack of perseverance) help to account for the established association between problem solving deficits and suicidal ideation. METHOD: Emerging adult college student drinkers with a history of at least passive suicidal ideation (N = 387) completed measures of problem solving, impulsivity, and suicidal ideation...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
David B Yourman
When there are politically polarizing events taking place in the world, can it be useful for a therapist to disclose his or her political views within the context of a psychotherapeutic dyad? This paper examines this question through the example of a Marxist therapist working with a politically conservative patient in the polarized political atmosphere following Donald Trump's election to the Presidency of the United States. Also explored are the patient's dynamics that might have made it particularly salient for the therapist to eschew a more neutral stance...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Barry A Farber
The election and postelection policies of Donald Trump have seeped into the psychotherapy sessions of many clients, in ways that are somewhat unique but also somewhat reminiscent of the ways that other dramatic social-political events, including 9/11 and the social divisions that were characteristic of the 1960s, were brought into the treatment room. The nine articles within this issue-seven papers from practicing psychotherapists, one from an executive coach, and one empirical paper-suggest strongly that the political events surrounding the election of 2016 have become a significant part of psychotherapeutic discourse for many clients, that many therapists have been willing participants in such discussions, and that a focus on political issues (broadly speaking) can have important clinical benefits, facilitating the therapeutic alliance and leading to greater understanding of long-standing client problems and interpersonal functioning...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Izabela Krejtz, Paweł Holas, Marzena Rusanowska, John B Nezlek
OBJECTIVE: The present study examined the effectiveness of online positive attention bias modification training (ABMT) in inducing positive attention and positive interpretational biases in depressed individuals. METHOD: Clinically depressed individuals (n = 60) were randomly assigned to one of two conditions of 14-day online ABMT. In the positive ABMT condition, a probe replaced positive stimuli in 100% of trials. In the control condition, the probe replaced positive stimuli in 50% of trials...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Christopher R Berghoff, John P Forsyth, Timothy R Ritzert, Georg H Eifert, Drew A Anderson
OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the incremental effects of a computerized values clarification (VC) activity on anxiety symptomology and quality of life over and above establishment of a mindfulness meditation (MM) practice. METHOD: Anxious participants (N = 120, Female = 86; Mage  = 22.26) were randomly assigned to a 2-week, 10-min daily MM practice + control task or a 2-week, 10-min daily MM practice + VC task. Pre-assessments and post-assessments included well-established and ideographic self-report measures...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Jean M Birbilis
Psychologists' work is always impacted by political events. Donald Trump's election raised many questions regarding my work with clients and students. How would they be impacted? What would they need? How would I respond? How transparent would I be? Students needed to process it. Most clients wanted to talk about it. However, reactions and needs of those who wanted to talk about it varied, and a few did not want to talk about it at all. Nevertheless, the election has been a royal road to the therapeutic alliance and interventions with clients, and it has been a path to deeper learning for students...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Frank P Deane, Craig Gonsalvez, Caroline Joyce, Eileen Britt
OBJECTIVE: This research aimed to describe the developmental trajectories of clinical psychology trainees across competency domains over multiple placements. METHOD: Competency reviews of 252 trainees were completed at mid-placement and end-placement for up to four consecutive placements by 143 field supervisors. Competency was measured across multiple domains using the Clinical Psychology Practicum Competencies Rating Scale. RESULTS: There was an overall ascending stepped pattern occurring across all competency domains from early to late placements...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Nili Solomonov, Jacques P Barber
The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the 2016 United States presidential election and ensuing political climate on patients' experiences in psychotherapy. A sample of 604 self-described Democrat and Republican patients from 50 states participated in the study. Results showed that most therapists disclosed their political stance (explicitly or implicitly) and most patients discussed politics with their therapists. 64% of Clinton supporters and 38% of Trump supporters assumed political similarity with their therapist...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Anne C Wilson, Amelia Aldao, Jennifer Cheavens
OBJECTIVES: A large body of work suggests that cognitive reappraisal is an effective strategy for modifying emotional intensity. In addition, its habitual use has been linked to adaptive psychological functioning, operationalized as low levels of symptoms of psychopathology. However, little is known about the impact of cognitive reappraisal on behavioral aspects of mental disorders. For example, the experience of fear is often accompanied by the behavioral urge to avoid the feared stimuli...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Patricia M Raskin
The purpose of this article is to present a case history of an individual client deeply affected by the 2016 election of Donald Trump: an unexpected key to her self-empowerment. Raised in poverty and with a history of being sexually abused, the client's anger and frustration at Hillary Clinton's loss in the election led to an examination in therapy of the role of gender in her life and enabled her to strengthen her sense of agency in her world.
March 12, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Michelle L Davis, Matthew McCann, Wayne K Goodman, Eric A Storch
A recent survey of Americans found that the majority experienced stress during and after the 2016 United States presidential election. Psychosocial, environmental stressors can have a unique impact on symptom presentation in mental health disorders. This manuscript details a case illustration of an individual whose symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder were directly linked to the election, as well as how these symptoms were addressed via treatment with intensive exposure and response prevention.
March 12, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Michael F Lorber, Shu Xu, Richard E Heyman, Amy M Smith Slep, Theodore P Beauchaine
OBJECTIVES: We sought to identify subgroups of individuals based on patterns of psychological health problems (PH; e.g., depressive symptoms, hazardous drinking) and family maltreatment (FM; e.g., child and partner abuse). METHOD: We analyzed data from very large surveys of United States Air Force active duty members with romantic partners and children. RESULTS: Latent class analyses indicated six replicable patterns of PH problems and FM...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Gadi Zerach, Yossi Levi-Belz
OBJECTIVES: We aim to examine the link between exposure to potentially morally injurious events (PMIEs) and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSS). We also aim to explore the mediating roles of depressive attributions, trauma-related guilt and shame, and self-disgust in the relationship between PMIEs and PTSS among combat veterans. METHOD: A volunteers' sample of 191 Israeli combat veterans responded to self-report questionnaires in a cross-sectional design study...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Laurie Thomas
Political events leading up to, and following the results of, the November, 2016 election have affected patients in psychotherapy as well as clients working with executive coaches. This article follows developments in coaching work with one male, middle-aged, highly successful but "interpersonally challenged" client that are traceable to the client's reactions to the election and to the president himself.
March 12, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Steven K Huprich, Sharon Nelson, Aimee Sohnleitner, Ketrin Lengu, Sneha Shankar, Kyle Rexer
In the clinical and empirical literature, vulnerable narcissism and malignant self-regard (MSR) have been found to be highly interrelated and associated with theoretically related personality constructs, suggesting that the two constructs may be much more similar than different. The present study set out to test this hypothesis by examining the relationship of vulnerable narcissism and MSR to experiences and expressions of anger, the factor structure of grandiose and vulnerable narcissism with MSR, the associations of MSR and vulnerable narcissism to the five factor model of personality, and to global self-esteem in self-report measures within 1168 undergraduate students...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Jennifer M Flaherty, Robert J Spencer, Lauren L Drag, Percival H Pangilinan, Linas A Bieliauskas
OBJECTIVES: This study examined how depression, anxiety, and sleep items from the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI) predict results from longer inventories. METHOD: This was a retrospective review from 484, predominantly male (96.1%) Veterans, mean age 29.7 years, who underwent brief neuropsychological screening during a comprehensive, multidisciplinary evaluation for mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants completed the NSI, insomnia severity index (ISI), and hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS)...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Eric C Meyer, Sheila B Frankfurt, Nathan A Kimbrel, Bryann B DeBeer, Suzy B Gulliver, Sandra B Morrisette
OBJECTIVES: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) strongly predicts greater disability and lower quality of life (QOL). Mindfulness-based and other third-wave behavior therapy interventions improve well-being by enhancing mindfulness, self-compassion, and psychological flexibility. We hypothesized that these mechanisms of therapeutic change would comprise a single latent factor that would predict disability and QOL after accounting for PTSD symptom severity. METHOD: Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans (N = 117) completed a study of predictors of successful reintegration...
February 28, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
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