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British Journal for the History of Science

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28228185/knowledge-of-childhood-materiality-text-and-the-history-of-science-an-interdisciplinary-round-table-discussion
#1
Felix Rietmann, Mareike Schildmann, Caroline Arni, Daniel Thomas Cook, Davide Giuriato, Novina Göhlsdorf, Wangui Muigai
This round table discussion takes the diversity of discourse and practice shaping modern knowledge about childhood as an opportunity to engage with recent historiographical approaches in the history of science. It draws attention to symmetries and references among scientific, material, literary and artistic cultures and their respective forms of knowledge. The five participating scholars come from various fields in the humanities and social sciences and allude to historiographical and methodological questions through a range of examples...
February 23, 2017: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28219473/needham-at-the-crossroads-history-politics-and-international-science-in-wartime-china-1942-1946
#2
Thomas Mougey
In 1946, the British biochemist Joseph Needham returned from a four-year stay in China. Needham scholars have considered this visit as a revelatory period that paved the way for his famous book series Science and Civilization in China (SCC). Surprisingly, however, Needham's actual time in China has remained largely unstudied over the last seventy years. As director of the Sino-British Scientific Cooperation Office, Needham travelled throughout Free China to promote cooperation between British and Chinese scientists to contain the Japanese invasion during the Second World War...
February 21, 2017: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202102/how-lives-became-lists-and-scientific-papers-became-data-cataloguing-authorship-during-the-nineteenth-century
#3
Alex Csiszar
The Catalogue of Scientific Papers, published by the Royal Society of London beginning in 1867, projected back to the beginning of the nineteenth century a novel vision of the history of science in which knowledge was built up out of discrete papers each connected to an author. Its construction was an act of canon formation that helped naturalize the idea that scientific publishing consisted of special kinds of texts and authors that were set apart from the wider landscape of publishing. By recovering the decisions and struggles through which the Catalogue was assembled, this essay aims to contribute to current efforts to denaturalize the scientific paper as the dominant genre of scientific life...
February 16, 2017: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202101/berber-genealogy-and-the-politics-of-prehistoric-archaeology-and-craniology-in-french-algeria-1860s-1880s
#4
Bonnie Effros
Following the conquest of Algiers and its surrounding territory by the French army in 1830, officers noted an abundance of standing stones in this region of North Africa. Although they attracted considerably less attention among their cohort than more familiar Roman monuments such as triumphal arches and bridges, these prehistoric remains were similar to formations found in Brittany and other parts of France. The first effort to document these remains occurred in 1863, when Laurent-Charles Féraud, a French army interpreter, recorded thousands of dolmens and stone formations south-west of Constantine...
February 16, 2017: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27935474/a-pathology-of-progress-locating-the-historiography-of-cancer
#5
Agnes Arnold-Forster
Despite its prominent position in today's medical research, popular culture and everyday life, cancer's history is relatively unwritten. Compared to the other great 'plagues' - cholera, tuberculosis or tropical fevers, to name but a scant handful - cancer has few dedicated pages in the general surveys, and its specialists have largely failed to convince the broader community of medical historians - or indeed historians of anything at all - that histories of the disease can tell us fundamental things about the science and practice of medicine, both past and present...
December 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27890041/introduction-plurality-in-patenting-medical-technology-and-cultures-of-protection
#6
James F Stark
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27884216/honour-and-subsistence-invention-credit-and-surgery-in-the-nineteenth-century
#7
Sally Frampton
The origins of contemporary exclusion of surgical methods from patenting lie in the complexities of managing credit claims in operative surgery, recognized in the nineteenth century. While surgical methods were not deemed patentable, surgeons were nevertheless embedded within patent culture. In an atmosphere of heightened awareness about the importance of 'inventors', how surgeons should be recognized and rewarded for their inventions was an important question. I examine an episode during the 1840s which seemed to concretize the inapplicability of patents to surgical practice, before looking at alternatives to patenting, used by surgeons to gain social and financial credit for inventions...
December 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27881194/authority-and-ownership-the-growth-and-wilting-of-medicine-patenting-in-georgian-england
#8
Alan Mackintosh
Secret, owned, Georgian medicines were normally known as patent medicines, though few had a current patent. Up to 1830, just 117 medicines had been patented, whilst over 1,300 were listed for taxation as 'patent medicines'. What were the benefits of patenting? Did medicine patenting affect consumer perception, and how was this used as a marketing tool? What were the boundaries of medical patenting? Patents for therapeutic preparations provided an apparent government guarantee on the source and composition of widely available products, while the patenting of medical devices seems to have been used to grant a temporary monopoly for the inventor's benefit...
December 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27881189/pharmaceutical-patenting-and-the-transformation-of-american-medical-ethics
#9
Joseph M Gabriel
The attitudes of physicians and drug manufacturers in the US toward patenting pharmaceuticals changed dramatically from the mid-nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth. Formerly, physicians and reputable manufacturers argued that pharmaceutical patents prioritized profit over the advancement of medical science. Reputable manufactures refused to patent their goods and most physicians shunned patented products. However, moving into the early twentieth century, physicians and drug manufacturers grew increasingly comfortable with the idea of pharmaceutical patents...
December 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27881188/a-barrier-to-medical-treatment-british-medical-practitioners-medical-appliances-and-the-patent-controversy-1870-1920
#10
Claire L Jones
From the late nineteenth century onwards there emerged an increasingly diverse response to escalating patenting activity. Inventors were generally supportive of legislation that made patenting more accessible, while others, especially manufacturers, saw patenting culture as an impediment. The medical profession claimed that patenting represented 'a barrier to medical treatment' and was thus detrimental to the nation's health, yet, as I argue, the profession's development of strict codes of conduct forbidding practitioners from patenting resulted in rebellion from some members, who increasingly sought protection for their inventions...
December 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27871338/mathematical-subtleties-and-scientific-knowledge-francis-bacon-and-mathematics-at-the-crossing-of-two-traditions
#11
Giuliano Mori
This article engages the much-debated role of mathematics in Bacon's philosophy and inductive method at large. The many references to mathematics in Bacon's works are considered in the context of the humanist reform of the curriculum studiorum and, in particular, through a comparison with the kinds of natural and intellectual subtlety as they are defined by many sixteenth-century authors, including Cardano, Scaliger and Montaigne. Additionally, this article gives a nuanced background to the 'subtlety' commonly thought to have been eschewed by Bacon and by Bacon's self-proclaimed followers in the Royal Society of London...
November 22, 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27719698/spain-s-magic-mountain-narrating-prehistory-at-atapuerca
#12
Oliver Hochadel
The Sierra de Atapuerca in northern Spain is ranked among the most important excavation sites in human origins research worldwide. The project boasts not only spectacular hominid fossils, among them the 'oldest European', but also a fully fledged 'popularization industry'. This article interprets this multimedia industry as a generator of different narratives about the researchers as well as about the prehistoric hominids of Atapuerca. It focuses on the popular works of the three co-directors of the project...
September 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27719697/introduction
#13
Amanda Rees
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27719696/stories-of-stones-and-bones-disciplinarity-narrative-and-practice-in-british-popular-prehistory-1911-1935
#14
Amanda Rees
This paper explores how three central figures in the field of British prehistory - Sir Arthur Keith, Sir Grafton Elliot Smith and Louis Leakey - deployed different disciplinary practices and narrative devices in the popular accounts of human bio-cultural evolution that they produced during the early decades of the twentieth century. It shows how they used a variety of strategies, ranging from virtual witness through personal testimony to tactile demonstration, to ground their authority to interpret the increasingly wide range of fossil material available and to answer the bewildering variety of questions that could be asked about them...
September 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27719695/a-translation-of-the-linnaean-dissertation-the-invisible-world
#15
Janis Antonovics, Jacobus Kritzinger
This study presents the first translation from Latin to English of the Linnaean dissertation Mundus invisibilis or The Invisible World, submitted by Johannes Roos in 1769. The dissertation highlights Linnaeus's conviction that infectious diseases could be transmitted by living organisms, too small to be seen. Biographies of Linnaeus often fail to mention that Linnaeus was correct in ascribing the cause of diseases such as measles, smallpox and syphilis to living organisms. The dissertation itself reviews the work of many microscopists, especially on zoophytes and insects, marvelling at the many unexpected discoveries...
September 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27719694/the-beginnings-of-human-palaeontology-prehistory-craniometry-and-the-fossil-human-races
#16
Matthew R Goodrum
Since the nineteenth century, hominid palaeontology has offered critical information about prehistoric humans and evidence for human evolution. Human fossils discovered at a time when there was growing agreement that humans existed during the Ice Age became especially significant but also controversial. This paper argues that the techniques used to study human fossils from the 1850s to the 1870s and the way that these specimens were interpreted owed much to the anthropological examination of Stone, Bronze, and Iron Age skeletons retrieved by archaeologists from prehistoric tombs throughout Europe...
September 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27719693/the-most-brutal-of-human-skulls-measuring-and-knowing-the-first-neanderthal
#17
Paige Madison
A fossilized skeleton discovered in 1856 presented naturalists with a unique challenge. The strange, human-looking bones of the first recognized Neanderthal confronted naturalists with a new type of object for which they had no readily available interpretive framework. This paper explores the techniques and approaches used to understand these bones in the years immediately following the discovery, in particular 1856-1864. Historians have previously suggested that interpretations and debates about Neanderthals hinged primarily on social, political and cultural ideologies...
September 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27324812/travancore-s-magnetic-crusade-geomagnetism-and-the-geography-of-scientific-production-in-a-princely-state
#18
Jessica Ratcliff
In 1840 the raja of Travancore, Swathi Thirunal, would offer his government's assistance to the British Association for the Advancement of Science and its plan for a global system of magnetic observations. Over the next thirty years, the two directors of this princely state's observatory, John Caldecott and John Allan Broun, would pursue fundamental terrestrial magnetic research. Their efforts would culminate in the Trivandrum [Trevandrum] Magnetical Observations (1874). In what follows, the history of this publication is used to shed light on how and why a semi-autonomous princely state such as Travancore would engage the scientific community in Europe at this time...
June 21, 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27353946/film-lessons-early-cinema-for-historians-of-science
#19
Jesse Olszynko-Gryn
Despite much excellent work over the years, the vast history of scientific filmmaking is still largely unknown. Historians of science have long been concerned with visual culture, communication and the public sphere on the one hand, and with expertise, knowledge production and experimental practice on the other. Scientists, we know, drew pictures, took photographs and made three-dimensional models. Rather like models, films could not be printed in journals until the digital era, and this limited their usefulness as evidence...
June 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27353945/presidential-address-experimenting-with-the-scientific-past
#20
Gregory Radick
When it comes to knowledge about the scientific pasts that might have been - the so-called 'counterfactual' history of science - historians can either debate its possibility or get on with the job. Taking the latter course means re-engaging with some of the most general questions about science. It can also lead to fresh insights into why particular episodes unfolded as they did and not otherwise. Drawing on recent research into the controversy over Mendelism in the early twentieth century, this address reports and reflects on a novel teaching experiment conducted in order to find out what biology and its students might be like now had the controversy gone differently...
June 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
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