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British Journal for the History of Science

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29665887/a-cabinet-of-the-ordinary-domesticating-veterinary-education-1766-1799
#1
Kit Heintzman
In the late eighteenth century, the Ecole vétérinaire d'Alfort was renowned for its innovative veterinary education and for having one of the largest natural history and anatomy collections in France. Yet aside from a recent interest in the works of one particular anatomist, the school's history has been mostly ignored. I examine here the fame of the school in eighteenth-century travel literature, the historic connection between veterinary science and natural history, and the relationship between the school's hospital and its esteemed cabinet...
April 18, 2018: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29655387/specimens-slips-and-systems-daniel-solander-and-the-classification-of-nature-at-the-world-s-first-public-museum-1753-1768
#2
Edwin D Rose
The British Museum, based in Montague House, Bloomsbury, opened its doors on 15 January 1759, as the world's first state-owned public museum. The Museum's collection mostly originated from Sir Hans Sloane (1660-1753), whose vast holdings were purchased by Parliament shortly after his death. The largest component of this collection was objects of natural history, including a herbarium made up of 265 bound volumes, many of which were classified according to the late seventeenth-century system of John Ray (1627-1705)...
April 15, 2018: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29650057/blood-money-harvey-s-de-motu-cordis-1628-as-an-exercise-in-accounting
#3
Michael J Neuss
William Harvey's famous quantitative argument from De motu cordis (1628) about the circulation of blood explained how a small amount of blood could recirculate and nourish the entire body, upending the Galenic conception of the blood's motion. This paper argues that the quantitative argument drew on the calculative and rhetorical skills of merchants, including Harvey's own brothers. Modern translations of De motu cordis obscure the language of accountancy that Harvey himself used. Like a merchant accounting for credits and debits, intake and output, goods and moneys, Harvey treated venous and arterial blood as essentially commensurate, quantifiable and fungible...
April 13, 2018: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29576034/science-and-self-assessment-phrenological-charts-1840-1940
#4
Fenneke Sysling
This paper looks at phrenological charts as mediators of (pseudo-)scientific knowledge to individual clients who used them as a means of self-assessment. Phrenologists propagated the idea that the human mind could be categorized into different mental faculties, with each particular faculty represented in a different area of the brain and by bumps on the head. In the US and the UK popular phrenologists examined individual clients for a fee. Drawing on a collection of phrenological charts completed for individual clients, this paper shows how charts aspired to convey new ideals of selfhood by using the authority of science in tailor-made certificates, and by teaching clients some of the basic practices of that science...
March 26, 2018: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29433592/ethnic-cartography-and-politics-in-vienna-1918-1945
#5
Petra Svatek
In Vienna, the close of the First World War and the period of the peace negotiations in Paris saw an enormous boom of ethnic-geographic research approaches and ethnic map-making. This process continued with the appointment of the Viennese geographer Hugo Hassinger (1877-1952) to the chair of human geography at University of Vienna in 1931 and intensified with the establishment of the South East German Research Association and the National Socialist takeover in March 1938. But did the initiatives to create ethnic maps originate with politicians and authorities, or did they come from the scientists themselves? This article argues that scientists embarked upon ethnic geographies on their own initiative...
February 13, 2018: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29415778/the-history-of-transdisciplinary-race-classification-methods-politics-and-institutions-1840s-1940s
#6
Richard McMahon
A recently blossoming historiographical literature recognizes that physical anthropologists allied with scholars of diverse aspects of society and history to racially classify European peoples over a period of about a hundred years. They created three successive race classification coalitions - ethnology, from around 1840; anthropology, from the 1850s; and interwar raciology - each of which successively disintegrated. The present genealogical study argues that representing these coalitions as 'transdisciplinary' can enrich our understanding of challenges to disciplinary specialization...
February 8, 2018: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29513200/utopian-biologies
#7
Jim Endersby
In 1924, the British biologist J.B.S. Haldane acknowledged that anyone who tried to predict where science was taking us was obliged to mention H.G. Wells, since '[t]he very mention of the future suggests him'. Nevertheless, Haldane complained that Wells was 'a generation behind the time', having been raised when flying and radiotelegraphy were genuinely scientific questions, but they were now mere 'commercial problems', Haldane asserted, and 'I believe that the centre of scientific interest lies in biology'...
March 2018: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29513199/apes-skulls-and-drums-using-images-to-make-ethnographic-knowledge-in-imperial-germany
#8
Marissa H Petrou
In this paper, I discuss the development and use of images employed by the Dresden Royal Museum for Zoology, Anthropology and Ethnography to resolve debates about how to use visual representation as a means of making ethnographic knowledge. Through experimentation with techniques of visual representation, the founding director, A.B. Meyer (1840-1911), proposed a historical, non-essentialist approach to understanding racial and cultural difference. Director Meyer's approach was inspired by the new knowledge he had gained through field research in Asia-Pacific as well as new forms of imaging that made highly detailed representations of objects possible...
March 2018: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29258626/the-past-as-a-work-in-progress
#9
Patricia Fara
Originating as a presidential address during the seventieth birthday celebrations of the British Society for the History of Science, this essay reiterates the society's long-standing commitment to academic autonomy and international cooperation. Drawing examples from my own research into female scientists and doctors during the First World War, I explore how narratives written by historians are related to their own lives, both past and present. In particular, I consider the influences on me of my childhood reading, my experiences as a physics graduate who deliberately left the world of science, and my involvement in programmes to improve the position of women in science...
March 2018: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29233232/phyllis-m-tookey-kerridge-and-the-science-of-audiometric-standardization-in-britain
#10
Jaipreet Virdi, Coreen McGuire
The provision of standardized hearing aids is now considered to be a crucial part of the UK National Health Service. Yet this is only explicable through reference to the career of a woman who has, until now, been entirely forgotten. Dr Phyllis Margaret Tookey Kerridge (1901-1940) was an authoritative figure in a variety of fields: medicine, physiology, otology and the construction of scientific apparatus. The astounding breadth of her professional qualifications allowed her to combine features of these fields and, later in her career, to position herself as a specialist to shape the discipline of audiometry...
March 2018: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29148357/cuts-and-the-cutting-edge-british-science-funding-and-the-making-of-animal-biotechnology-in-1980s-edinburgh
#11
Dmitriy Myelnikov
The Animal Breeding Research Organisation in Edinburgh (ABRO, founded in 1945) was a direct ancestor of the Roslin Institute, celebrated for the cloning of Dolly the sheep. After a period of sustained growth as an institute of the Agricultural Research Council (ARC), ABRO was to lose most of its funding in 1981. This decision has been absorbed into the narrative of the Thatcherite attack on science, but in this article I show that the choice to restructure ABRO pre-dated major government cuts to agricultural research, and stemmed from the ARC's wish to prioritize biotechnology in its portfolio...
December 2017: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29065936/john-dalton-and-the-origin-of-the-atomic-theory-reassessing-the-influence-of-bryan-higgins
#12
Mark I Grossman
During the years 1814-1819, William Higgins, an Irish chemist who worked at the Dublin Society, claimed he had anticipated John Dalton in developing the atomic theory and insinuated that Dalton was a plagiarist. This essay focuses not on William Higgins, but on his uncle Bryan Higgins, a well-known chemist of his day, who had developed his own theories of caloric and chemical combination, similar in many respects to that of Dalton. New evidence is first introduced addressing Bryan's disappearance from the scientific community after 1803...
December 2017: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29025437/pieter-van-musschenbroek-on-laws-of-nature
#13
Steffen Ducheyne, Pieter Present
In this article, we discuss the development of the concept of a 'law' (of nature) in the work of the Dutch natural philosopher and experimenter Petrus van Musschenbroek (1692-1761). Since Van Musschenbroek is commonly described as one of the first 'Newtonians' on the Continent in the secondary literature, we focus more specifically on its relation to Newton's views on this issue. Although he was certainly indebted to Newton for his thinking on laws (of nature), Van Musschenbroek's views can be seen to diverge from Newton's on crucial points...
December 2017: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29019300/the-politics-of-cognition-liberalism-and-the-evolutionary-origins-of-victorian-education
#14
Matthew Daniel Eddy
In recent years the historical relationship between scientific experts and the state has received increasing scrutiny. Such experts played important roles in the creation and regulation of environmental organizations and functioned as agents dispatched by politicians or bureaucrats to assess health-related problems and concerns raised by the public or the judiciary. But when it came to making public policy, scientists played another role that has received less attention. In addition to acting as advisers and assessors, some scientists were democratically elected members of local and national legislatures...
December 2017: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29019298/a-learned-artisan-debates-the-system-of-the-world-le-clerc-versus-mallemant-de-messange
#15
Oded Rabinovitch
Sébastien Le Clerc (1637-1714) was the most renowned engraver of Louis XIV's France. For the history of scientific publishing, however, Le Clerc represents a telling paradox. Even though he followed a traditional route based on classic artisanal training, he also published extensively on scientific topics such as cosmology and mathematics. While contemporary scholarship usually stresses the importance of artisanal writing as a direct expression of artisanal experience and know-how, Le Clerc's publications, and specifically the work on cosmology in his Système du monde (1706-1708), go far beyond this...
December 2017: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28978363/taking-newton-on-tour-the-scientific-travels-of-martin-folkes-1733-1735
#16
Anna Marie Roos
Martin Folkes (1690-1754) was Newton's protégé, an English antiquary, mathematician, numismatist and astronomer who would in the latter part of his career become simultaneously president of the Royal Society and of the Society of Antiquaries. Folkes took a Grand Tour from March 1733 to September 1735, recording the Italian leg of his journey from Padua to Rome in his journal. This paper examines Folkes's travel diary to analyse his Freemasonry, his intellectual development as a Newtonian and his scientific peregrination...
December 2017: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29103389/robert-boyle-and-the-representation-of-imperceptible-entities
#17
Alexander Wragge-Morley
In this essay, I examine Robert Boyle's strategies for making imperceptible entities accessible to the senses. It is well known that, in his natural philosophy, Boyle confronted the challenge of making imperceptible particles of matter into objects of sensory experience. It has never been noted, however, that Boyle confronted a strikingly similar challenge in his natural theology - he needed to make an equally imperceptible God accessible to the senses. Taking this symmetrical difficulty as my starting point, I propose a new approach to thinking about the interconnections between Boyle's natural philosophy and natural theology...
November 6, 2017: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28923130/regulating-cinematic-stories-about-reproduction-pregnancy-childbirth-abortion-and-movie-censorship-in-the-us-1930-1958
#18
David A Kirby
In the mid-twentieth century film studios sent their screenplays to Hollywood's official censorship body, the Production Code Administration (PCA), and to the Catholic Church's Legion of Decency for approval and recommendations for revision. This article examines the negotiations between filmmakers and censorship groups in order to show the stories that censors did, and did not, want told about pregnancy, childbirth and abortion, as well as how studios fought to tell their own stories about human reproduction...
September 2017: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28923129/a-cinema-for-the-unborn-moving-pictures-mental-pictures-and-electra-sparks-s-new-thought-film-theory
#19
Patrick Ellis
In the 1910s, New York suffragette Electra Sparks wrote a series of essays in the Moving Picture News that advocated for cine-therapy treatments for pregnant women. Film was, in her view, the great democratizer of beautiful images, providing high-cultural access to the city's poor. These positive 'mental pictures' were important for her because, she claimed, in order to produce an attractive, healthy child, the mother must be exposed to quality cultural material. Sparks's championing of cinema during its 'second birth' was founded upon the premise of New Thought...
September 2017: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28923128/-items-for-criticism-not-in-sequence-joseph-delee-pare-lorentz-and-the-fight-for-life-1940
#20
Caitjan Gainty
In the late 1920s, the American obstetrician Joseph DeLee brought the motion-picture camera into the birth room. Following that era's trend of adapting industrial efficiency practices for medical environments, DeLee's films give spectacular and unexpected expression to the engineering concept of 'streamlining'. Accomplishing what more tangible obstetric streamlining practices had failed to, DeLee's cameras, and his post-production manipulation, shifted birth from messy and dangerous to rationalized, efficient, death-defying...
September 2017: British Journal for the History of Science
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