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Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30241765/preventing-and-managing-operating-room-fires-in-otolaryngology-head-and-neck-surgery
#1
REVIEW
Soham Roy, Lee P Smith
Otolaryngologists are at high risk of surgical fire. During surgery in the head and neck region there is close proximity of 3 essential elements: an ignition source, a fuel, and an oxidizing agent. In this article, the authors highlight the scenarios where fire may occur and offer steps that surgeons can take to minimize risk for their patients. By understanding the elements of the fire triad, otolaryngologists can decrease the risk of surgical fire, through careful control of oxidizers, ignition sources, and potential fuels in the operating room...
September 18, 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30241764/evaluation-and-management-of-facial-nerve-schwannoma
#2
REVIEW
Alicia M Quesnel, Felipe Santos
Facial nerve schwannomas are benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors that arise from Schwann cells, and most commonly present with facial paresis and/or hearing loss. Computed tomography and MRI are critical to diagnosis. Management decisions are based on tumor size, facial function, and hearing status. Observation is usually the best option in patients with good facial function. For patients with poor facial function, the authors favor surgical resection with facial reanimation. There is growing evidence to support radiation treatment in patients with progressively worsening moderate facial paresis and growing tumors...
September 18, 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30241763/resident-and-fellow-engagement-in-safety-and-quality
#3
REVIEW
Sarah N Bowe, Michael E McCormick
Beyond educational and institutional requirements, there is a need for trainees (residents and fellows) to learn patient safety and quality improvement skills in order to achieve the ultimate goal of providing better patient care. Key steps to engagement include creating a safety and quality culture, supporting faculty development, and selecting appropriate curricular resources. Efforts to align the goals and processes of the graduate medical education institution and teaching hospital can foster a unified mission...
September 18, 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228003/you-re-never-fully-dressed-without-a-smile
#4
EDITORIAL
Sujana S Chandrasekhar
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 15, 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30228002/facial-palsy-diagnostic-and-therapeutic-management
#5
EDITORIAL
Teresa M O, Nate Jowett, Tessa Hadlock
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 15, 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30172554/outcome-tracking-in-facial-palsy
#6
REVIEW
Joseph R Dusseldorp, Martinus M van Veen, Suresh Mohan, Tessa A Hadlock
Outcome tracking in facial palsy is multimodal, consisting of patient-reported outcome measures, clinician-graded scoring systems, objective assessment tools, and novel tools for layperson and spontaneity assessment. Patient-reported outcome measures are critical to understanding burden of disease in facial palsy and effects of interventions from the patient perspective. Clinician-graded scoring systems are inherently subjective and no 1 single system satisfies all needs. Objective assessment tools quantify facial movements but can be laborious...
August 29, 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30170700/surgical-management-of-acute-facial-palsy
#7
REVIEW
Daniel Q Sun, Nicholas S Andresen, Bruce J Gantz
Bell palsy and traumatic facial nerve injury are two common causes of acute facial palsy. Most patients with Bell palsy recover favorably with medical therapy alone. However, those with complete paralysis (House-Brackmann 6/6), greater than 90% degeneration on electroneurography, and absent electromyography activity may benefit from surgical decompression via a middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach. Patients with acute facial palsy from traumatic temporal bone fracture who meet these same criteria may be candidates for decompression via an MCF or translabyrinthine approach based on hearing status...
August 28, 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30170699/surgical-management-of-postparalysis-facial-palsy-and-synkinesis
#8
REVIEW
Babak Azizzadeh, Julia L Frisenda
Modified selective neurectomy of the distal branches of the buccal, zygomatic, and cervical branches of the facial nerve in addition to platysmal myotomy is an effective surgical procedure for the treatment of postfacial paralysis synkinesis. Success of this procedure depends on identification of the peripheral facial nerve branches, preservation of zygomatic and marginal mandibular branches that innervate key smile muscles, and ablation of buccal and cervical branches that cause lateral and/or inferior excursion of the oral commissure...
August 28, 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30170698/management-of-long-standing-flaccid-facial-palsy-periocular-considerations
#9
REVIEW
Natalie Homer, Aaron Fay
Ineffective eyelid closure can pose a serious risk of injury to the ocular surface and eye. In cases of eyelid paresis, systematic examination of the eye and ocular adnexa will direct appropriate interventions. Specifically, 4 distinct periorbital regions should be independently assessed: eyebrow, upper eyelid, ocular surface, and lower eyelid. Corneal exposure can lead to dehydration, thinning, scarring, infection, perforation, and blindness. Long-term sequelae following facial nerve palsy may also include epiphora, gustatory lacrimation, and synkinesis...
August 28, 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30166122/management-of-bilateral-facial-palsy
#10
REVIEW
Leahthan F Domeshek, Ronald M Zuker, Gregory H Borschel
Bilateral facial paralysis is a rare entity that occurs in both pediatric and adult patients and can have congenital or acquired causes. When paralysis does not resolve with conservative or medical management, surgical intervention may be indicated. This article presents the authors' preferred technique for facial reanimation in patients with bilateral congenital facial paralysis. Specifically, a staged bilateral segmental gracilis transfer to ipsilateral nerve to masseter is discussed.
August 27, 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30149944/management-of-long-standing-flaccid-facial-palsy-midface-smile-locoregional-muscle-transfer
#11
REVIEW
James A Owusu, Kofi Derek Boahene
Masseter and temporalis muscle transfer is an effective technique for restoring facial symmetry and commissure excursion in flaccid facial paralysis. Adherence to the principles and biomechanics of muscle transfer is essential for achieving optimal results. Muscle transfer has the advantage of being single staged with fast recovery of function. It is particularly useful in patients with low life expectancy or multiple comorbidities where a more complex, multiple stage procedure may be detrimental.
August 24, 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30119926/a-general-approach-to-facial-palsy
#12
REVIEW
Nate Jowett
Management of facial palsy can be daunting. This article presents a conceptual framework for classification and therapeutic management of facial palsy.
August 15, 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30104040/free-gracilis-transfer-and-static-facial-suspension-for-midfacial-reanimation-in-long-standing-flaccid-facial-palsy
#13
REVIEW
Nate Jowett, Tessa Hadlock
This article presents an approach to reanimation of the midface in long-standing flaccid facial palsy by means of functional free gracilis transfer and static facial suspension.
August 10, 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30104039/the-importance-and-psychology-of-facial-expression
#14
REVIEW
Lisa E Ishii, Jason C Nellis, Kofi Boahene, Patrick Byrne, Masaru Ishii
Facial expression is of critical importance in interpersonal interactions. Thus, patients with impaired facial expression due to facial paralysis experience impaired social interactions. Numerous studies have shown that patients with facial paralysis and impaired facial expression suffer social consequences as demonstrated by being rated negatively with regards to attractiveness, affect display, and other traits. This has been demonstrated subjectively and objectively. Fortunately, reconstructive surgeries that restore the ability to express emotion can restore normalcy in these patients...
August 10, 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30220405/appreciating-the-intricacies-of-a-stuffy-nose
#15
EDITORIAL
Sujana S Chandrasekhar
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30219199/erratum
#16
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30057071/diagnostic-algorithm-for-evaluating-nasal-airway-obstruction
#17
REVIEW
Jennifer A Villwock, Ronald B Kuppersmith
Nasal obstruction is a common symptom and can have a large impact on patient quality of life. There are numerous causes, including anatomic, congenital, inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, toxic, and systemic. An algorithmic approach can aid in ensuring all pertinent patient information is incorporated into the final diagnosis and treatment plan. Key components include a thorough history, physical examination including modified Cottle and Cottle maneuver, patient-reported outcome measures and/or quality of life questionnaires, examination with and without decongestion, and nasal endoscopy...
October 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30032999/nasal-airway-obstruction
#18
EDITORIAL
Jennifer A Villwock, Ronald B Kuppersmith
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30031550/pediatric-nasal-obstruction
#19
REVIEW
Matthew M Smith, Stacey L Ishman
Nasal obstruction is one of the most common problems seen by pediatric otolaryngologists. Prompt treatment of nasal obstruction can be critical in newborns and infants because of their obligatory nasal breathing. Older children will typically have more inflammatory, infectious, or traumatic causes of nasal obstruction. Nasal obstruction can lead to a significant decrease in the quality of life in children along with an increase health care expenditures.
October 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30029923/surgical-management-of-turbinate-hypertrophy
#20
REVIEW
Regan W Bergmark, Stacey T Gray
Inferior turbinate reduction is a common technique used to improve nasal breathing in patients with inferior turbinate hypertrophy. Subjective nasal breathing improves for the majority of patients with most surgical techniques, but effectiveness often diminishes over time. Inferior turbinate reduction techniques typically have low complication rates. Empty nose syndrome is a rare complication associated most classically with total or subtotal inferior turbinate reduction. Most techniques attempt to preserve the turbinate mucosa for the purposes of preserving normal mucociliary clearance and sensation...
October 2018: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
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