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Bulletin of the History of Medicine

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29681554/a-research-enclave-in-1940s-nigeria-the-rockefeller-foundation-yellow-fever-research-institute-at-yaba-lagos-1943-49
#1
Megan Vaughan
This article examines the history of yellow fever research carried out in West Africa in the 1940s by Rockefeller Foundation scientists. It engages with a number of debates in the history of medical research in colonial Africa, including experimentation, the construction of the "field," and biosecurity.
2018: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29681553/the-radicalization-of-breast-cancer-surgery-joseph-colt-bloodgood-s-role-in-william-stewart-halsted-s-legacy
#2
James R Wright
Johns Hopkins's surgeon William Stewart Halsted is renowned for popularizing the radical mastectomy, a disfiguring procedure that was overutilized during the 1900s. Cancer historians have questioned why Halsted, a meticulous surgical investigator, became more aggressive in his approach to breast cancer surgery when his own data failed to show prolonged patient survival. Joseph Colt Bloodgood, one of Halsted's early surgical residents, Hopkins's head of surgical pathology, and Halsted's primary outcome data analyst, played previously unrecognized roles...
2018: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29681552/the-cowpox-controversy-memory-and-the-politics-of-public-health-in-cuba
#3
Stephanie H Gonzalez
Vaccination played an important role in the formation of a national consciousness in Cuba, and vaccination's earliest promoters dominate nationalist narratives of medical achievement on the island. This article investigates the intense hostility exhibited by the creole medical elite toward a pivotal figure in the history of smallpox vaccination in Cuba, Spanish physician Dr. Vicente Ferrer (1823-83), the first in the Americas to mass produce smallpox vaccine using calf vaccinifiers. I argue that anger and mistrust of both Ferrer and his innovatory vaccine production technology originated in the relationship between medical politics and cultural identity in late nineteenth-century Cuba...
2018: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29681551/-he-must-die-or-go-mad-in-this-place-prisoners-insanity-and-the-pentonville-model-prison-experiment-1842-52
#4
Catherine Cox, Hilary Marland
The relationship between prisons and mental illness has preoccupied prison administrators, physicians, and reformers from the establishment of the modern prison service in the nineteenth century to the current day. Here we take the case of Pentonville Model Prison, established in 1842 with the aim of reforming convicts through religious exhortation, rigorous discipline and training, and the imposition of separate confinement in its most extreme form. Our article demonstrates how following the introduction of separate confinement, the prison chaplains rather than the medical officers took a lead role in managing the minds of convicts...
2018: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29681550/the-fielding-h-garrison-lecture-great-doctor-history
#5
Barron H Lerner
For decades, physicians wrote much of the history of medicine, often "great man" histories that celebrated their colleagues' accomplishments as part of a celebratory historical narrative. Beginning in the 1970s, social historians challenged this type of scholarship, arguing that it was Whiggish, omitted the flaws of the medical profession, left patients out of the story, and ignored issues of gender, race, and class. This Garrison Lecture revisits this history through the prism of my recent book, The Good Doctor: A Father, a Son, and the Evolution of Medical Ethics, which is essentially a biography of my physician father, Phillip Lerner, and an autobiography...
2018: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29681549/comment-materia-medica
#6
Linda Nash
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2018: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29681548/climate-change-the-environment-physicians-and-historians
#7
Barron H Lerner
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2018: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29681547/to-place-or-not-to-place-toward-an-environmental-history-of-modern-medicine
#8
Christopher Sellers
Reviewing recent, overlapping work by historians of medicine and health and of environmental history, this article proposes a further agenda upon which scholars in both fields may converge. Both environmental and medical historians can seek to understand the past two centuries of medical history in terms of a seesaw dialogue over the ways and means by which physicians and other health professionals did, and did not, consider the influence of place-airs and waters included-on disease. Modernizing and professionalizing as well as new styles of science nourished attendant aspirations for a clinical place neutrality, for a medicine in which patients' own places didn't matter to what doctors thought or did...
2018: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29276193/american-women-physicians-in-world-war-i
#9
Janet Golden
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29276192/news-and-events
#10
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29276191/plagued-by-politics-cuba-s-national-sanatorium-project-1936-59
#11
Kelly Urban
In 1936, Fulgencio Batista, the head of the Cuban military (and the de facto ruler of Cuba), founded the National Tuberculosis Council (CNT) to lead a state-directed anti-tuberculosis campaign. While most national and colonial governments neglected tuberculosis until the postwar period, populist politics pushed Batista to prioritize a disease of poverty by the mid-1930s. However, national politics also undermined efforts to control the disease in Cuba. Authoritarianism facilitated Batista's considerable influence over tuberculosis policy, and he and his advisors pursued political objectives rather than following the technical advice offered by professional groups...
2017: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29276190/between-colonial-national-and-international-medicine-the-case-of-bejel
#12
Liat Kozma
In the 1920s and 1930s, doctors stationed in the Middle East and North Africa debated whether bejel, a form of endemic syphilis, was an Arab version of syphilis, or a separate disease altogether. Using their clinical experience in the region, they tried to weave this unfamiliar phenomenon into a civilizational narrative, which placed European civilization at the top of a hierarchy. The assumption was that there was something inherent to Islamic societies and their hygienic habits that accounted for this difference...
2017: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29276189/managing-the-obscene-m-d-medical-publishing-the-medical-profession-and-the-changing-definition-of-obscenity-in-mid-victorian-england
#13
Sarah Bull
This article examines links between mid-Victorian opposition to commerce in popular works on sexual health and the introduction of a legal test of obscenity, in the 1868 trial R. v. Hicklin, that opened the public distribution of any work that contained sexual information to prosecution. The article demonstrates how both campaigning medical journals' crusades against "obscene quackery" and judicial and anti-vice groups who aimed to protect public morals responded to unruly trade in medical print by linking popular medical works with public corruption...
2017: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29276188/treating-the-secret-disease-sex-sin-and-authority-in-eighteenth-century-venereal-cases
#14
Olivia Weisser
This article looks at cases of venereal disease from the early 1700s and how healers presented themselves as shrewd interpreters of patients' bodies and souls. Because the disease was so stigmatizing, patients were said to be unreliable narrators of their own symptoms and health histories. Practitioners, in turn, exhibited diagnostic expertise by sagely navigating such constraints. They characterized themselves as medical detectives who gathered clues and made diagnoses in spite of patients' alleged lies and omissions...
2017: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29276187/editors-note
#15
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29081436/news-and-events
#16
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29081435/american-association-for-the-history-of-medicine-report-of-the-ninetieth-annual-meeting
#17
Jodi L Koste
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29081434/entitled-to-addiction-pharmaceuticals-race-and-america-s-first-drug-war
#18
David Herzberg
This article rethinks the formative decades of American drug wars through a social history of addiction to pharmaceutical narcotics, sedatives, and stimulants in the first half of the twentieth century. It argues, first, that addiction to pharmaceutical drugs is no recent aberration; it has historically been more extensive than "street" or illicit drug use. Second, it argues that access to psychoactive pharmaceuticals was a problematic social entitlement constructed as distinctively medical amid the racialized reforms of the Progressive Era...
2017: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29081433/vernacularizing-the-body-informational-egalitarianism-hindu-divine-design-and-race-in-physiology-schoolbooks-bengal-1859-1877
#19
Projit Bihari Mukharji
Government-aided vernacular schools introduced "human physiology" as a subject in 1859. I use the first couple of schoolbooks and the debate running up to the introduction of the subject to open up the particular and specific histories through which modern anatomo-physiological knowledge was vernacularized in colonial Bengal. In so doing I have two interconnected goals in this article. My first goal is to analyze the precocious decision to teach human physiology to colonial schoolboys, at a time when this was the norm neither in Great Britain nor indeed in traditional Bengali schools...
2017: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29081432/-a-little-seasoning-would-aid-in-the-digestion-of-our-factums-wit-evidence-and-the-evolving-form-of-medical-debate-in-new-orleans-1853-1868
#20
Amy Forbes
This history of the categorization of yellow fever explores the interchange between rhetoric and evidence in understanding the disease. Eighteenth-century models of medicine relied on rhetorical manipulation to convince readers of accuracy, unlike modern medicine, which claims objective evidence as the professional standard. But how did the physician as intellectual give way to the physician as scientist? This article analyzes the transition through a case study: J.-C. Faget, who famously discovered the definitive sign of yellow fever, and Charles Deléry disputed how doctors should attempt to understand the disease in New Orleans, a vital yet understudied medical center dominated by Francophone creole interests...
2017: Bulletin of the History of Medicine
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