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Journal of Anatomy

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29148044/the-incidence-of-bent-dorsal-fins-in-free-ranging-cetaceans
#1
F Alves, J R Towers, R W Baird, G Bearzi, S Bonizzoni, R Ferreira, Z Halicka, A Alessandrini, A H Kopelman, C Yzoard, M H Rasmussen, C G Bertulli, E Jourdain, A Gullan, D Rocha, K Hupman, M-T Mrusczok, F I P Samarra, S Magalhães, C R Weir, J K B Ford, A Dinis
Laterally bent dorsal fins are rarely observed in free-ranging populations of cetaceans, contrary to captivity, where most killer whale Orcinus orca adult males have laterally collapsed fins. This topic has been poorly explored, and data/information on its occurrence and possible causes are limited. The present study: (i) undertakes a review of the available information on bent dorsal fins in free-ranging cetaceans, and updates it with new records, (ii) reports on the proportion of bent fins in different study populations, and (iii) discusses possible causes...
November 17, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29148042/comparative-anatomy-of-zebrafish-paired-and-median-fin-muscles-basis-for-functional-developmental-and-macroevolutionary-studies
#2
Natalia Siomava, Rui Diogo
In the last decades, Danio rerio became one of the most used model organisms in various evo-devo studies devoted to the fin skeletal anatomy and fin-limb transition. Surprisingly, there is not even a single paper about the detailed anatomy of the adult muscles of the five fin types of this species. To facilitate more integrative developmental, functional, genetic, and evolutionary studies of the appendicular musculoskeletal system of the zebrafish and to provide a basis for further comparisons with other fishes and tetrapods, we describe here the identity, overall configuration, and attachments of appendicular muscles in a way that can be easily understood and implemented by non-anatomist researchers...
November 17, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29148039/3d-analysis-of-sexual-dimorphism-in-size-shape-and-breathing-kinematics-of-human-lungs
#3
Nicole Torres-Tamayo, Daniel García-Martínez, Stephanie Lois Zlolniski, Isabel Torres-Sánchez, Francisco García-Río, Markus Bastir
Sexual dimorphism in the human respiratory system has been previously reported at the skeletal (cranial and thoracic) level, but also at the pulmonary level. Regarding lungs, foregoing studies have yielded sex-related differences in pulmonary size as well as lung shape details, but different methodological approaches have led to discrepant results on differences in respiratory patterns between males and females. The purpose of this study is to analyse sexual dimorphism in human lungs during forced respiration using 3D geometric morphometrics...
November 17, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29148040/the-endocranial-shape-of-australopithecus-africanus-surface-analysis-of-the-endocasts-of-sts-5-and-sts-60
#4
Amélie Beaudet, Jean Dumoncel, Frikkie de Beer, Stanley Durrleman, Emmanuel Gilissen, Anna Oettlé, Gérard Subsol, John Francis Thackeray, José Braga
Assessment of global endocranial morphology and regional neuroanatomical changes in early hominins is critical for the reconstruction of evolutionary trajectories of cerebral regions in the human lineage. Early evidence of cortical reorganization in specific local areas (e.g. visual cortex, inferior frontal gyrus) is perceptible in the non-human South African hominin fossil record. However, to date, little information is available regarding potential global changes in the early hominin brain. The introduction of non-invasive imaging techniques opens up new perspectives for the study of hominin brain evolution...
November 16, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29114853/the-evolution-of-the-manus-of-early-theropod-dinosaurs-is-characterized-by-high-inter-and-intraspecific-variation
#5
Daniel E Barta, Sterling J Nesbitt, Mark A Norell
The origin of the avian hand, with its reduced and fused carpals and digits, from the five-fingered hands and complex wrists of early dinosaurs represents one of the major transformations of manus morphology among tetrapods. Much attention has been directed to the later part of this transition, from four- to three-fingered taxa. However, earlier anatomical changes may have influenced these later modifications, possibly paving the way for a later frameshift in digit identities. We investigate the five- to four-fingered transition among early dinosaurs, along with changes in carpus morphology...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29098692/ontogeny-of-hallucal-metatarsal-rigidity-and-shape-in-the-rhesus-monkey-macaca-mulatta-and-chimpanzee-pan-troglodytes
#6
Biren A Patel, Jason M Organ, Tea Jashashvili, Stephanie H Bui, Holly M Dunsworth
Life history variables including the timing of locomotor independence, along with changes in preferred locomotor behaviors and substrate use during development, influence how primates use their feet throughout ontogeny. Changes in foot function during development, in particular the nature of how the hallux is used in grasping, can lead to different structural changes in foot bones. To test this hypothesis, metatarsal midshaft rigidity [estimated from the polar second moment of area (J) scaled to bone length] and cross-sectional shape (calculated from the ratio of maximum and minimum second moments of area, Imax /Imin ) were examined in a cross-sectional ontogenetic sample of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta; n = 73) and common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes; n = 79)...
November 3, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29098687/the-human-platysma-contains-numerous-muscle-spindles
#7
Astrid May, Silvia Bramke, Richard H W Funk, Christian Albrecht May
The mimic muscles are usually described as containing no muscle spindles. In the present publication the human platysma was reinvestigated concerning its content of corpuscular sensors. Serial sections through the platysma of seven donors revealed numerous muscle spindles but no Pacini corpuscules. The muscle spindles were located in the cranial two-thirds of the platysma, and were evenly distributed with a tendency to have more spindles in the lateral part of the muscle. Immunohistochemical staining with S46 antibodies revealed a predominance of nuclear bag fibers...
November 3, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29098684/comparative-hindlimb-myology-of-foot-propelled-swimming-birds
#8
Glenna T Clifton, Jennifer A Carr, Andrew A Biewener
Several groups of birds have convergently evolved the ability to swim using their feet despite facing trade-offs with walking. However, swimming relative to terrestrial performance varies across these groups. Highly specialized divers, such as loons and grebes, excel at swimming underwater but struggle to stand on land, whereas species that primarily swim on the water surface, such as Mallards, retain the ability to move terrestrially. The identification of skeletal features associated with a swimming style and conserved across independent groups suggests that the hindlimb of foot-propelled swimming birds has adapted to suit the physical challenges of producing propulsive forces underwater...
November 3, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29082536/the-tympanic-region-of-otaria-byronia-otariidae-carnivora-morphology-ontogeny-age-classes-and-dimorphism
#9
C M Loza, A C Scarano, F C Galliari, L H Soibelzon, J Negrete, A A Carlini
Here we describe and explore for the first time the ontogeny and sexual dimorphism of the auditory region of Otaria byronia. We studied the tympanic region of skulls of 237 specimens of different ages and sexes. Geometric morphometric methods were used to analyze the tympanic bulla. In addition, 3D reconstructions of the tympanic bulla were performed using computed tomography analysis scans and a serial wearing technique. We provide a description of the external and internal morphology of the tympanic bulla in both sexes and across different stages (bioclasses)...
October 29, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29071711/a-quantitative-approach-for-analysing-bone-modelling-patterns-from-craniofacial-surfaces-in-hominins
#10
Natalia Brachetta-Aporta, Paula N Gonzalez, Valeria Bernal
Bone size and shape arise throughout ontogeny as a result of the coordinated activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, responsible for bone deposition and resorption, and growth displacements. The modelling processes leave specific microstructural features on the bone surface, which can be used to infer the mechanisms shaping craniofacial traits in extinct and extant species. However, the analysis of bone surfaces from fossils and archaeological samples faces some difficulties related to the bone loss caused by taphonomic factors, and the lack of formal methods for estimating missing information and comparing the patterns of bone modelling among several specimens and samples...
October 25, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29063604/obituary-professor-mike-benjamin-1948-2017
#11
Bernard Moxham
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 24, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29063597/patterning-spinal-nerves-and-vertebral-bones
#12
REVIEW
Roger Keynes
A prominent anatomical feature of the peripheral nervous system is the segmentation of mixed (motor, sensory and autonomic) spinal nerves alongside the spinal cord. During early development their axon growth cones avoid the developing vertebral elements by traversing the anterior/cranial half of each somite-derived sclerotome, so ensuring the separation of spinal nerves from vertebral bones as axons extend towards their peripheral targets. A glycoprotein expressed on the surface of posterior half-sclerotome cells confines growth cones to the anterior half-sclerotomes by contact repulsion...
October 24, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29063595/pulmonary-anatomy-and-a-case-of-unilateral-aplasia-in-a-common-snapping-turtle-chelydra-serpentina-developmental-perspectives-on-cryptodiran-lungs
#13
E R Schachner, J C Sedlmayr, R Schott, T R Lyson, R K Sanders, M Lambertz
The common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) is a well studied and broadly distributed member of Testudines; however, very little is known concerning developmental anomalies and soft tissue pathologies of turtles and other reptiles. Here, we present an unusual case of unilateral pulmonary aplasia, asymmetrical carapacial kyphosis, and mild scoliosis in a live adult C. serpentina. The detailed three-dimensional (3D) anatomy of the respiratory system in both the pathological and normal adult C. serpentina, and a hatchling are visualized using computed tomography (CT), microCT, and 3D digital anatomical models...
October 24, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29034479/scaling-of-the-ankle-extensor-muscle-tendon-units-and-the-biomechanical-implications-for-bipedal-hopping-locomotion-in-the-post-pouch-kangaroo-macropus-fuliginosus
#14
Edward P Snelling, Andrew A Biewener, Qiaohui Hu, David A Taggart, Andrea Fuller, Duncan Mitchell, Shane K Maloney, Roger S Seymour
Bipedal hopping is used by macropods, including rat-kangaroos, wallabies and kangaroos (superfamily Macropodoidea). Interspecific scaling of the ankle extensor muscle-tendon units in the lower hindlimbs of these hopping bipeds shows that peak tendon stress increases disproportionately with body size. Consequently, large kangaroos store and recover more strain energy in their tendons, making hopping more efficient, but their tendons are at greater risk of rupture. This is the first intraspecific scaling analysis on the functional morphology of the ankle extensor muscle-tendon units (gastrocnemius, plantaris and flexor digitorum longus) in one of the largest extant species of hopping mammal, the western grey kangaroo Macropus fuliginosus (5...
October 16, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29034473/development-and-maturation-of-the-fibrous-components-of-the-arterial-roots-in-the-mouse-heart
#15
Rachel Richardson, Lorraine Eley, Charlotte Donald-Wilson, Jonathon Davis, Natasha Curley, Ahlam Alqahtani, Lindsay Murphy, Robert H Anderson, Deborah J Henderson, Bill Chaudhry
The arterial roots are important transitional regions of the heart, connecting the intrapericardial components of the aortic and pulmonary trunks with their ventricular outlets. They house the arterial (semilunar) valves and, in the case of the aorta, are the points of coronary arterial attachment. Moreover, because of the semilunar attachments of the valve leaflets, the arterial roots span the anatomic ventriculo-arterial junction. By virtue of this arrangement, the interleaflet triangles, despite being fibrous, are found on the ventricular aspect of the root and located within the left ventricular cavity...
October 15, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29027198/shape-analysis-of-spatial-relationships-between-orbito-ocular-and-endocranial-structures-in-modern-humans-and-fossil-hominids
#16
Ana Sofia Pereira-Pedro, Michael Masters, Emiliano Bruner
The orbits and eyes of modern humans are situated directly below the frontal lobes and anterior to the temporal lobes. Contiguity between these orbital and cerebral elements could generate spatial constraints, and potentially lead to deformation of the eye and reduced visual acuity during development. In this shape analysis we evaluate whether and to what extent covariation exists between ocular morphology and the size and spatial position of the frontal and temporal areas in adult modern humans. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to investigate patterns of variation among the brain and eyes, while computed tomography (CT) was used to compare cranial morphology in this anatomical region among modern humans, extinct hominids and chimpanzees...
October 13, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29023687/a-guide-for-effective-anatomical-vascularization-studies-useful-ex%C3%A2-vivo-methods-for-both-ct-and-mri-imaging-before-dissection
#17
Yohann Renard, Gabriela Hossu, Bailiang Chen, Marine Krebs, Marc Labrousse, Manuela Perez
The objective of this study was to develop a simple and useful injection protocol for imaging cadaveric vascularization and dissection. Mixtures of contrast agent and cast product should provide adequate contrast for two types of ex vivo imaging (MRI and CT) and should harden to allow gross dissection of the injected structures. We tested the most popular contrast agents and cast products, and selected the optimal mixture composition based on their availability and ease of use. All mixtures were first tested in vitro to adjust dilution parameters of each contrast agent and to fine-tune MR imaging acquisition sequences...
October 11, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29023763/cps49-induced-neurotoxicity-does-not-cause-limb-patterning-anomalies-in-developing-chicken-embryos
#18
Chris Mahony, Scott McMenemy, Alexandra J Rafipay, Shaunna-Leigh Beedie, Lucas Rosa Fraga, Michael Gütschow, William D Figg, Lynda Erskine, Neil Vargesson
Thalidomide notoriously caused severe birth defects, particularly to the limbs, in those exposed in utero following maternal use of the drug to treat morning sickness. How the drug caused these birth defects remains unclear. Many theories have been proposed including actions on the forming blood vessels. However, thalidomide survivors also have altered nerve patterns and the drug is known for its neurotoxic actions in adults following prolonged use. We have previously shown that CPS49, an anti-angiogenic analog of thalidomide, causes a range of limb malformations in a time-sensitive manner in chicken embryos...
October 10, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29023695/the-biorhythm-of-human-skeletal-growth
#19
Patrick Mahoney, Justyna J Miszkiewicz, Simon Chapple, Mona Le Luyer, Stephen H Schlecht, Tahlia J Stewart, Richard A Griffiths, Chris Deter, Debbie Guatelli-Steinberg
Evidence of a periodic biorhythm is retained in tooth enamel in the form of Retzius lines. The periodicity of Retzius lines (RP) correlates with body mass and the scheduling of life history events when compared between some mammalian species. The correlation has led to the development of the inter-specific Havers-Halberg oscillation (HHO) hypothesis, which holds great potential for studying aspects of a fossil species biology from teeth. Yet, our understanding of if, or how, the HHO relates to human skeletal growth is limited...
October 10, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29023694/adaptive-self-organization-in-the-embryo-its-importance-to-adult-anatomy-and-to-tissue-engineering
#20
REVIEW
Jamie A Davies
The anatomy of healthy humans shows much minor variation, and twin-studies reveal at least some of this variation cannot be explained genetically. A plausible explanation is that fine-scale anatomy is not specified directly in a genetic programme, but emerges from self-organizing behaviours of cells that, for example, place a new capillary where it happens to be needed to prevent local hypoxia. Self-organizing behaviour can be identified by manipulating growing tissues (e.g. putting them under a spatial constraint) and observing an adaptive change that conserves the character of the normal tissue while altering its precise anatomy...
October 10, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
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