journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Progress in Neurological Surgery

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26647465/preface
#1
Konstantin V Slavin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26394391/technology-for-peripheral-nerve-stimulation
#2
REVIEW
John L Parker, Tracy Cameron
Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) has been in use for over 50 years to treat patients suffering from chronic pain who have failed conservative treatments. Despite this long history, the devices being used have changed very little. In fact, current PNS technology was developed specifically for spinal cord stimulation. The use of technology developed for other applications in PNS has led to an unnecessary number of device complications and the limited adoption of this promising therapy. The following chapter provides an overview of PNS technology throughout the years, outlining both the benefits and limitations...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26394389/regulation-of-peripheral-nerve-stimulation-technology
#3
REVIEW
Daniel M Birk, Dali Yin, Konstantin V Slavin
The number of peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) indications, targets, and devices is expanding, yet the development of the technology has been slow because many devices used for PNS do not have formal regulatory approval. Manufacturers have not sought Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for PNS devices because of a perceived lack of interest amongst practitioners and patients. Without FDA approval, companies cannot invest in marketing to educate the implanters and the patients about the benefits of PNS in the treatment of chronic pain...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26394372/sphenopalatine-ganglion-stimulation-in-neurovascular-headaches
#4
REVIEW
Jean Schoenen
The interest for the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) in neurovascular headaches dates back to 1908 when Sluder presented his work on the role of the SPG in 'nasal headaches', which are now part of the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and cluster headache (ICHD-III-beta). Since then various interventions with blocking or lesional properties have targeted the SPG (transnasal injection of lidocaine and other agents, alcohol or steroid injections, radiofrequency lesions, or even ganglionectomy); success rates vary, but benefit is usually transient...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26394301/stimulation-of-the-dorsal-root-ganglion
#5
REVIEW
Liong Liem
Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) stimulation has recently emerged as a new neuromodulation modality that stays on the intersection of the peripheral and central nervous system. With DRG location within the spinal column and with electrodes for DRG stimulation placed through the intraspinal epidural space, it may make more sense to group DRG stimulation together with more commonly used spinal cord stimulation (SCS) rather than peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS), particularly if one agrees that the stimulation delivered to DRG partly works downstream at the spinal cord level...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26394258/hypoglossal-nerve-stimulation-for-obstructive-sleep-apnea
#6
REVIEW
Gimbada B Mwenge, Philippe Rombaux, Benoit Lengele, Daniel Rodenstein
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a very frequent affliction that affects about 1-5% of the adult population in its severe form. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most commonly used treatment and is highly effective, but its use is limited by low long-term adherence rates and overall poor acceptance among the patients. Therefore, there is a need for developing alternative approaches to OSA treatment, including a more 'natural' concept of maintaining an open airway through neuromodulation. Here we review the concept, scientific rationale, and technical details of hypoglossal nerve stimulation...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26394209/sacral-nerve-stimulation-in-the-treatment-of-bowel-disorders
#7
REVIEW
Johan Nordenstam, Anne-Marie Boller, Anders Mellgren
Defecation problems occur in patients of all ages, but are more prevalent in the elderly, postpartum women, and patients with chronic and debilitating medical conditions. Most of the time, these problems respond to medical therapy and nonsurgical options, but it is not uncommon for patients to require surgical intervention. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) presents an alternative for patients with bowel dysfunction combining proven therapeutic benefits and limited surgical risks. Here we describe the common indications for SNS, patient selection, technical details of the procedure, published outcomes, and complications that can arise...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26394178/carotid-sinus-nerve-stimulation-for-treatment-of-resistant-hypertension-and-heart-failure
#8
REVIEW
Dali Yin, Konstantin V Slavin
Hypertension and cardiovascular disease are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The prevalence of resistant hypertension remains high and is expected to increase. Moreover, there are limitations to therapeutic interventions aimed at treating resistant hypertension and heart failure despite the wide availability of therapeutic agents and dietary and lifestyle modification. Device-based therapy by baroreflex activation via carotid sinus/nerve stimulation is currently undergoing investigation, and promising findings from clinical trials have been published...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26394134/sacral-neuromodulation-for-genitourinary-problems
#9
REVIEW
Mai Banakhar, Magdy Hassouna
Sacral neuromodulation (SNM) is a minimally invasive therapeutic option for many voiding dysfunction conditions. It is approved by the US FDA for refractory overactive bladder with and without incontinence and nonobstructive retention. Since SNM has shown a favorable response for these approved indications, other therapeutic applications have been proposed for various conditions such as painful bladder syndrome, chronic pelvic pain and neurological voiding dysfunction in both adult and pediatric age groups...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26394074/trigeminal-ganglion-stimulation
#10
REVIEW
Jean-Pierre Van Buyten
Facial pain in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve, commonly identified as trigeminal neuralgia, should not be confused with trigeminal neuropathic pain. The latter is caused by an accidental and nonintentional nerve lesion. When the first-line pharmacological treatment fails to provide satisfactory pain relief, surgical treatment, such as microvascular decompression and neurodestructive interventions (radiofrequency or cryotherapy), is not indicated. The logical choice of technique becomes neuromodulation, but it may be challenging to perform in the facial area...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26394030/peripheral-neurostimulation-with-a-microsize-wireless-stimulator
#11
REVIEW
Thomas L Yearwood, Laura Tyler Perryman
Implementation of wireless technology enables tremendous reduction in the size of implantable neurostimulator devices. Without the need for tethering to an implantable pulse generator, a multitude of clinical applications can be envisioned, utilizing safe, rapidly implanted, economical, and culturally sensitive methods. External pulse generators providing power to implanted microsize wireless leads and/or contact pairs can be incorporated into belts, fabric, jewelry, and other suitable and convenient accoutrements...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26393957/phrenic-nerve-stimulation-technology-and-clinical-applications
#12
REVIEW
Shane V Abdunnur, Daniel H Kim
Phrenic nerve stimulation is a technique used to reanimate the diaphragm of patients with central nervous system etiologies of respiratory insufficiency. Current clinical indications include congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, spinal cord injury above C4, brain stem injury, and idiopathic severe sleep apnea. Presurgical evaluation ensures proper patient selection by validating the intact circuit from the phrenic nerve through alveolar oxygenation. The procedure involves placing leads around the phrenic nerves bilaterally and attaching these leads to radio receivers in a subcutaneous pocket...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26393911/peripheral-neuromodulation-to-treat-postamputation-pain
#13
REVIEW
Amol Soin, Zi-Ping Fang, Jon Velasco
Some of the more common peripherally mediated pain disorders are postamputation stump pain and phantom pain. These disabling conditions have proven difficult to treat. Here we aim to illustrate an option to treat postamputation pain using peripheral neurostimulation techniques. Traditional peripheral neuromodulation techniques use standard stimulation parameters and work by stimulation of nerve tissues which are then felt by the patient as a tingling sensation or paresthesia. Recently introduced high-frequency (10 kHz) electrical nerve block [HFAC (high-frequency alternating current) block] via a surgically implanted peripheral nerve cuff electrode results in true conduction block which actually blocks action potentials emanating from the painful neuroma and thus suppresses pain without tingling or paresthesia felt by the patient...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26393819/vagus-nerve-stimulation-for-major-depressive-episodes
#14
REVIEW
Sam Eljamel
Stimulation of the left vagus nerve is a novel antidepressive therapy that relies upon the vagal projections to the brain stem to modulate brain circuits involved in mood regulation. There is cumulative evidence from prospective and long-term studies that has demonstrated tolerability and effectiveness of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) in major depressive episodes (MDE). VNS in MDE has the following advantages: symptomatic response (defined as at least a 50% improvement in MDE severity) occurs in at least 15-17% of patients after 10 weeks of VNS treatment and in at least 22-37% of patients after 12 months of VNS treatment, remissions are observed in at least 15-17% of patients after 12 months of treatment, there is a sustained response in 13-27% of patients during 12 months of VNS, and successful maintenance of the initial improvement is observed in a high percentage of patients (73-77% of patients who had meaningful or greater benefit after 3 months of treatment maintained at least meaningful benefit after 12 months of treatment)...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26393784/peripheral-nerve-stimulation-for-pain-in-extremities-an-update
#15
REVIEW
Jason E Pope, Jonathan D Carlson, William S Rosenberg, Konstantin V Slavin, Timothy R Deer
Pain in extremities may occur in a variety of central and peripheral neuropathic and nociceptive syndromes, some of which may respond to central neuromodulation procedures. Peripheral neuromodulation techniques, either as a stand-alone therapy or as an adjuvant to spinal cord stimulation, may be particularly effective when the pain is localized to a part of a single extremity or when the source of the pain is related to the malfunction of a known peripheral nerve. Further, peripheral neuromodulation is used to treat disorders in which central simulation fails to provide discrete therapeutic paresthesia...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26393531/vagus-nerve-stimulation-for-epilepsy-an-evidence-based-approach
#16
REVIEW
Arthur Cukiert
Medical treatment of seizures yields a satisfactory response in 75-80% of the patients; resective epilepsy surgery is a therapeutic option for those patients who are refractory to drug therapy, but there is still a considerable portion (20-30%) of patients who are ineligible for surgery or failed surgery. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) might be an option for these very refractory patients. We carried out an evidence-based search to identify the best evidence presently available related to the use of VNS. We used multiple searchable databases (primary: PubMed-MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and SciELO; secondary: Cochrane Library) and a standard structured approach know as the PICO scheme: P (patient), I (intervention), C (comparison), and O (outcome)...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26393502/peripheral-nerve-stimulation-for-back-pain
#17
REVIEW
Paul Verrills, Marc Russo
Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) generally refers to stimulation of a named nerve via direct placement of a lead next to the nerve either via a percutaneous or open approach; in peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS), leads are subcutaneously placed to stimulate the region of affected nerves, cutaneous afferents, or the dermatomal distribution of the nerves which converge back to the spinal cord. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in using the PNS approach for many otherwise refractory pain conditions; however, PNFS appears to be more effective for the management of low back pain and therefore more attractive...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26393499/vagus-nerve-stimulation-surgical-technique-and-complications
#18
REVIEW
Volker M Tronnier
Chronic stimulation of the left vagus nerve (VNS) is commonly performed for different clinical conditions such as refractory epilepsy in children and adults, and major and bipolar depression. Despite more than 20 years of cumulative experience with VNS implantation, various surgery- and modality-related complications continue to occur in a sizable percentage of patients. A clear understanding of surgical anatomy and following standard operating protocol may, at least theoretically, reduce the number of complications...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26393349/theoretical-basis-of-vagus-nerve-stimulation
#19
REVIEW
Frank Attenello, Arun Paul Amar, Charles Liu, Michael L J Apuzzo
Despite a myriad of medical and surgical treatments for epilepsy developed over the past few decades, a large subset of patients remains refractory to treatment. Over this time period, vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has become an accepted and viable treatment modality for this population. Since the earliest report of VNS implantation in 1988, tens of thousands of patients worldwide have received VNS therapy, and >100,000 patient-years of experience have been accrued. The mechanisms underlying the response to VNS therapy continue to be elucidated...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26393345/occipital-nerve-stimulation-for-migraine-update-from-recent-multicenter-trials
#20
REVIEW
Todd J Schwedt, A Laine Green, David W Dodick
Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) continues to be investigated for the treatment of refractory chronic migraine. Results from case series and from prospective, sham-controlled clinical trials remain inconclusive regarding the efficacy of ONS for migraine treatment. Safety and implantation techniques require improvements since rates of lead migration, infection, and persistent stimulator-related pain continue to be high. Existing data justify further ONS trials with carefully chosen primary outcome(s), adequate statistical power, and improved surgical techniques...
2015: Progress in Neurological Surgery
journal
journal
21582
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"