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Anesthesia Progress

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30235438/airway-scope%C3%A2-for-difficult-ventilation-in-a-patient-with-epiglottic-cyst
#1
Takeo Sugita, Hirofumi Arisaka
Epiglottic cysts often cause difficulty in airway management, with potential serious life-threatening complications. 1 This case report describes a patient with an epiglottic cyst in whom mask ventilation became difficult after induction of anesthesia. Immediately, an AirWay Scope™ (TMAWS-S100; Pentax, Japan) was inserted orally, and the location of the epiglottis was clarified to assess the reason for difficulty with ventilation. This case demonstrates usefulness of the AirWay Scope in patients with epiglottic cyst...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30235437/effect-of-nitrous-oxide-on-pulpal-anesthesia-a-preliminary-study
#2
Papimon Chompu-Inwai, Sophon Simprasert, Patchanee Chuveera, Areerat Nirunsittirat, Thanapat Sastraruji, Tanida Srisuwan
To compare the success of perceived pulpal anesthesia between groups using nitrous oxide/oxygen (N2 O/O2 ) and oxygen (O2 ) in children premedicated with ibuprofen with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis permanent teeth. Thirty-three children (mean age 10.4 ± 1.9 years) with 33 symptomatic irreversible pulpitis permanent teeth were included in this preliminary study. All children were premedicated with ibuprofen and randomly assigned to receive either N2 O/O2 (17 participants) or O2 (16 participants). Four percent articaine with epinephrine 1:100,000 was administered, and vital pulp therapy was performed...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30235436/office-based-anesthetic-and-oral-surgical-management-of-a-child-with-hereditary-sensory-autonomic-neuropathy-type-iv-a-case-report
#3
Shamit Prabhu, Kevin Fortier, Lisa Newsome, Uday N Reebye
Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV (HSAN IV), or congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis, is an exceptionally rare genetic disorder that results in the complete loss of pain and temperature sensation as well as anhidrosis. Anesthetic management of these patients can be difficult because of significantly increased risks during general anesthesia. Literature on perioperative anesthetic management is typically written in the context of a hospital setting. As such, our case presents a unique report on the anesthetic management of a HSAN IV patient who presented for extraction of 2 teeth in an office-based setting...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30235435/a-review-of-current-literature-of-interest-to-the-office-based-anesthesiologist
#4
Mark A Saxen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30235434/male-gender-and-high-trait-anxiety-are-2-major-factors-associated-with-severe-dental-fear-and-avoidance
#5
Yoshiaki Ihara, Ken-Ichi Fukuda, Naoko Saita, Tatsuya Ichinohe
The purpose of this article is to investigate the association between the background characteristics of patients with severe fear of dental treatment who frequently avoid dental care and the degree of difficulty in treating them. At the time of initial presentation at a dental phobia clinic, each of 321 subjects was asked to complete the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Dental Anxiety Scale, and a health questionnaire related to phobic objects. Subjects who rejected oral examination with a dental mirror were categorized as being severely difficult to treat, whereas those who were able to undergo examination were categorized as being moderately difficult to treat...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30235433/when-can-the-recovery-process-be-delegated-to-staff
#6
Steven Ganzberg
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30235432/american-society-of-dentist-anesthesiologists-parameters-of-care
#7
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30235431/comparison-of-risk-factors-in-patients-with-acute-and-chronic-orofacial-pain
#8
Yoshifumi Honda, Toshiyuki Handa, Ken-Ichi Fukuda, Yoshihiko Koukita, Tatsuya Ichinohe
Management of patients with orofacial pain may benefit from a better understanding about patient factors that may lead pain chronicity. In this study, we retrospectively compared physical and psychological factors in patients with acute and chronic orofacial pain. We analyzed data from 854 patients presenting to the Orofacial Pain Center, Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Tokyo Dental College, Suidobashi Hospital between April 2010 and March 2014. We categorized patients into the acute group if their condition had persisted <6 months and the chronic group if their condition had lasted 6 months or longer, based on the classification by the International Association for the Study of Pain...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30235430/anesthetic-management-of-the-hypertensive-patient-part-ii
#9
Russell Yancey
Hypertension is an important health challenge that affects millions of people across the world today and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is critical that anesthesia providers have a working knowledge of the systemic implications of hypertension. This review article will discuss the medical definitions of hypertension, the physiology of maintaining blood pressure, outpatient treatment of hypertension, anesthetic implications, and the common medications used by anesthesia providers in the treatment of hypertension...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30235429/general-anesthetic-management-of-a-patient-with-hypertrophic-cardiomyopathy-for-oral-surgery-did-digitalis-contribute-to-bradycardia
#10
Aiji Sato Boku, Maki Morita, MinHye So, Tetsuya Tamura, Fumiaki Sano, Yasuyuki Shibuya, Jun Harada, Kazuya Sobue
Stabilization of circulatory dynamics is a critical issue in the anesthetic management of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). In this report, we managed general anesthesia for a 74-year-old male patient with nonobstructive HCM who developed circulatory instability intraoperatively. Severe bradycardia measuring 35 beats/min and hypotension measuring 78 mm Hg systolic were observed during surgery. Using stroke volume variation and stroke volume from the FloTrac as indices, successful circulatory management was performed with dopamine...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30235428/comparison-of-the-contact-force-exerted-on-teeth-by-conventional-macintosh-laryngoscope-versus-video-laryngoscopes
#11
Yasuhiko Kato, Yasushi Sakuma, Yoshihiro Momota
During laryngoscopy, the laryngoscope blade sometimes comes in contact with the teeth, fracturing or dislocating them. However, no studies have compared the effects of newly marketed video laryngoscopes and the Macintosh laryngoscope (Mac) on teeth. In this study, we measured and compared the force exerted on the teeth of an intubating manikin by the Mac, the Airway Scope (Pentax), and the McGrath MAC (Covidien). The mean force exerted was 141.1 ± 15.7 kg by the Mac, 39.2 ± 10.3 kg by the Airway Scope, and 48...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30235427/the-effect-of-dexmedetomidine-on-oral-mucosal-blood-flow-and-the-absorption-of-lidocaine
#12
Shu Tomita, Shinya Yamazaki, Kohei Togami, Hitoshi Tada, Hiroyoshi Kawaai
Dexmedetomidine (DEX) is a sedative and analgesic agent that acts via the alpha-2 adrenoreceptor and is associated with reduced anesthetic requirements, as well as attenuated blood pressure and heart rate in response to stressful events. A previous study reported that cat gingival blood flow was controlled via sympathetic alpha-adrenergic fibers involved in vasoconstriction. In the present study, experiment 1 focused on the relationship between the effects of DEX on alpha adrenoreceptors and vasoconstriction in the tissues of the oral cavity and compared the palatal mucosal blood flow (PMBF) in rabbits between general anesthesia with sevoflurane and sedation with DEX...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30235426/atrio-ventricular-block-following-neostigmine-glycopyrrolate-reversal-in-non-heart-transplant-patients-case-report
#13
Njinkeng J Nkemngu, Joel N Tochie
Neostigmine is the anticholinesterase drug most commonly used to reverse blockade or speed up recovery from neuromuscular blockade from nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking drugs. Because of its cardiac muscarinic effects, prior or simultaneous administration of glycopyrrolate or atropine is usually recommended. There have been a few case reports of bradycardia, atrio-ventricular (AV) block, and cardiac arrest following neostigmine/glycopyrrolate administration to reverse neuromuscular block affecting several patients...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30235425/dr-david-donaldson-bds-fdsrcs-mds-fadsa-faad-dental-educator-and-sedation-pioneer-dies-at-76
#14
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952652/alternating-current-iontophoresis-for-control-of-postoperative-pain
#15
Kazumasa Kubota, Tomoyuki Miyamoto, Takutoshi Inoue, Haruhisa Fukayama
Control of early postoperative pain entails the use of various medications including acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, tramadol, and opioids. However, these medications should be carefully administered in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease because some medications may trigger adverse reactions after maxillofacial surgeries. The goal of postoperative pain control in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease is to eliminate pain without complications...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952651/commentary
#16
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952650/retained-foreign-body-in-the-nasal-cavity-after-oral-maxillofacial-surgery
#17
Masanori Tsukamoto, Jun Hirokawa, Takeshi Yokoyama
Retained foreign bodies sometimes occur in various surgical procedures and can lead to severe complications. Foreign bodies in the oral and maxillofacial region are not rare because of the use of many small items and the natural communication with the outside environment in some areas. We experienced a case of foreign body in the nasal cavity, which was discovered 1 year later at a second operation for hardware removal after maxillofacial surgery. A small, soft material is usually placed between the nasal endotracheal tube and nostril to avoid nasal pressure ulcer at the ala of nose after prolonged anesthesia after our group's experiencing some cases of this complication...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952649/thermophysical-properties-of-thermosoftening-nasotracheal-tubes
#18
Yoshihiro Takasugi, Koichi Futagawa, Takashi Umeda, Kouhei Kazuhara, Satoshi Morishita
Thermosoftening treatment of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) nasotracheal tubes (NTTs) can reduce the incidence and amount of epistaxis during nasotracheal intubation. The optimal thermal setting for thermosoftening treatment of NTTs without burn injury was investigated. Two composite types of PVC NTTs were used. Following withdrawal of the PVC NTTs from a bottle of water at 45 or 60°C, the changes in the surface temperature of the NTTs were measured by infrared thermography. Hardness of the NTTs at 25, 30, 35, and 40°C was measured...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952648/pilot-study-comparing-nasal-vs-oral-intubation-for-dental-surgery-by-physicians-nurse-anesthetists-and-trainees
#19
J Patrick Bowman, Michael P Nedley, Kimberly A Jenkins, Charles R Fahncke
The purpose of this article was to determine if pediatric dental treatment under general anesthesia utilizing orotracheal intubation takes longer than using nasotracheal intubation techniques. Twenty-six American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification I and II pediatric dental patients, ages 2-8 years treated under general anesthesia, were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: (a) nasotracheal intubation (control, n = 13), (b) orotracheal intubation (experimental, n = 13). Times for intubation, radiographic imaging, and dental procedures, as well as total case time were quantified...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952647/a-case-of-general-anesthesia-for-a-young-infant-in-whom-intubation-was-suspected-to-be-difficult-because-of-a-thyrolingual-cyst
#20
Tomoyasu Noguchi, Noriko Miyazawa, Nami Ooyama, Tatsuya Ichinohe
This is a case report of an infant who underwent thyrolingual cystectomy under general anesthesia. Two tracheal tubes were used: 1 for nasopharyngeal airway and the other for fiberoptic intubation. With this method, nasal intubation was successfully performed without hypoxia and hypercapnia even in a 3-month-old infant. We concluded this is a useful intubation method for infants who are predicted to be a difficult intubation.
2018: Anesthesia Progress
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