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Anesthesia Progress

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952652/alternating-current-iontophoresis-for-control-of-postoperative-pain
#1
Kazumasa Kubota, Tomoyuki Miyamoto, Takutoshi Inoue, Haruhisa Fukayama
Control of early postoperative pain entails the use of various medications including acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, tramadol, and opioids. However, these medications should be carefully administered in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease because some medications may trigger adverse reactions after maxillofacial surgeries. The goal of postoperative pain control in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease is to eliminate pain without complications...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952651/commentary
#2
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952650/retained-foreign-body-in-the-nasal-cavity-after-oral-maxillofacial-surgery
#3
Masanori Tsukamoto, Jun Hirokawa, Takeshi Yokoyama
Retained foreign bodies sometimes occur in various surgical procedures and can lead to severe complications. Foreign bodies in the oral and maxillofacial region are not rare because of the use of many small items and the natural communication with the outside environment in some areas. We experienced a case of foreign body in the nasal cavity, which was discovered 1 year later at a second operation for hardware removal after maxillofacial surgery. A small, soft material is usually placed between the nasal endotracheal tube and nostril to avoid nasal pressure ulcer at the ala of nose after prolonged anesthesia after our group's experiencing some cases of this complication...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952649/thermophysical-properties-of-thermosoftening-nasotracheal-tubes
#4
Yoshihiro Takasugi, Koichi Futagawa, Takashi Umeda, Kouhei Kazuhara, Satoshi Morishita
Thermosoftening treatment of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) nasotracheal tubes (NTTs) can reduce the incidence and amount of epistaxis during nasotracheal intubation. The optimal thermal setting for thermosoftening treatment of NTTs without burn injury was investigated. Two composite types of PVC NTTs were used. Following withdrawal of the PVC NTTs from a bottle of water at 45 or 60°C, the changes in the surface temperature of the NTTs were measured by infrared thermography. Hardness of the NTTs at 25, 30, 35, and 40°C was measured...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952648/pilot-study-comparing-nasal-vs-oral-intubation-for-dental-surgery-by-physicians-nurse-anesthetists-and-trainees
#5
J Patrick Bowman, Michael P Nedley, Kimberly A Jenkins, Charles R Fahncke
The purpose of this article was to determine if pediatric dental treatment under general anesthesia utilizing orotracheal intubation takes longer than using nasotracheal intubation techniques. Twenty-six American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification I and II pediatric dental patients, ages 2-8 years treated under general anesthesia, were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: (a) nasotracheal intubation (control, n = 13), (b) orotracheal intubation (experimental, n = 13). Times for intubation, radiographic imaging, and dental procedures, as well as total case time were quantified...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952647/a-case-of-general-anesthesia-for-a-young-infant-in-whom-intubation-was-suspected-to-be-difficult-because-of-a-thyrolingual-cyst
#6
Tomoyasu Noguchi, Noriko Miyazawa, Nami Ooyama, Tatsuya Ichinohe
This is a case report of an infant who underwent thyrolingual cystectomy under general anesthesia. Two tracheal tubes were used: 1 for nasopharyngeal airway and the other for fiberoptic intubation. With this method, nasal intubation was successfully performed without hypoxia and hypercapnia even in a 3-month-old infant. We concluded this is a useful intubation method for infants who are predicted to be a difficult intubation.
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952646/tapia-s-syndrome
#7
Shadaab Mumtaz, Alastair Henry, Mark Singh
More than 100,000 general anesthetic procedures are conducted in United Kingdom every year for dental interventions, according to large survey of the National Health Services. 1 The risk of mortality has reduced considerably in the past few decades because of the use of safe and effective techniques. However, adverse effects still exist and are dependent on patient, environmental, and operator factors. We present an uncommon complication of intubation that merits due awareness.
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952645/true-allergy-to-amide-local-anesthetics-a-review-and-case-presentation
#8
Babak Bina, Elliot V Hersh, Micael Hilario, Kenia Alvarez, Bradford McLaughlin
Adverse reactions to local anesthetics are usually a reaction to epinephrine, vasovagal syncope, or overdose toxicity. Allergic reactions to local anesthetics are often attributed to additives such as metabisulfite or methylparaben. True allergic reactions to amide local anesthetics are extremely rare but have been documented. Patients with true allergy to amide local anesthetics present a challenge to the dental practitioner in providing adequate care with appropriate intraoperative pain management. Often, these patients may be treated under general anesthesia...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952644/effects-of-lidocaine-and-articaine-on-neuronal-survival-and-recovery
#9
Farraj Albalawi, Jason C Lim, Kyle V DiRenzo, Elliot V Hersh, Claire H Mitchell
The local anesthetics lidocaine and articaine are among the most widely used drugs in the dentist's arsenal, relieving pain by blocking voltage-dependent Na+ channels and thus preventing transmission of the pain signal. Given reports of infrequent but prolonged paresthesias with 4% articaine, we compared its neurotoxicity and functional impairment by screening cultured neural SH-SY5Y cells with formulations used in patients (2% lidocaine + 1:100,000 epinephrine or 4% articaine + 1:100,000 epinephrine) and with pure formulations of the drugs...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952643/sedation-with-a-combination-of-dexmedetomidine-and-midazolam-for-pediatric-dental-surgery
#10
Teppei Sago, Shunji Shiiba, Eika Ando, Kiriko Kondo, Misato Tsunakake, Sayaka Akitomi, Aya Ono, Yukari Kato, Yuki Chogyoji, Seiji Watanabe
Intravenous sedation (IVS) is commonly used to complete dental treatment for uncooperative pediatric patients. Propofol (PRO) is widely used for IVS because of its short context sensitive half-time and amnestic effect. However, administering PRO to patients who have a history of egg anaphylaxis is still somewhat controversial. The evidence that supports the potential risks for allergic reactions following PRO use in patients with egg allergies is limited with some anesthesiologists recommending against its use in these patients...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952642/sugammadex-efficacy-and-practicality-in-the-dental-office
#11
Stephen Goetz, Benjamin Pritts, Bryant Cornelius Dds
Sugammadex is a novel drug capable of reversing paralysis induced by the common steroidal nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking drugs, rocuronium and vecuronium. Reversal is complete at any depth of blockade dependent on the dose of sugammadex administered. This allows rocuronium to be used as a rescue agent in scenarios where succinylcholine is contraindicated. Sugammadex is considered a safe drug with minimal side effects compared with traditional reversal with neostigmine and glycopyrrolate. This article features a case report where succinylcholine was undesirable and rapid reversal of paralysis with sugammadex was used during general anesthesia for dentistry...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952641/the-effect-of-adding-midazolam-to-propofol-intravenous-sedation-to-suppress-gag-reflex-during-dental-treatment
#12
Toru Yamamoto, Keiko Fujii-Abe, Haruhisa Fukayama, Hiroshi Kawahara
We retrospectively investigated the efficacy and safety of propofol administration alone and in combination with midazolam for gag reflex suppression during dental treatment under intravenous sedation. We included 56 patients with an overactive gag reflex who were to undergo dental treatment under intravenous sedation. They were divided into propofol (P group, n = 22) and midazolam with propofol (MP group, n = 34) groups. The P group received propofol alone, while the MP group received midazolam (0.04 mg/kg) prior to target-controlled infusion (TCI) of propofol (titrated for adequate sedation)...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952640/come-to-ifdas-in-nara-japan
#13
Steven Ganzberg
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952639/utility-of-vibratory-stimulation-for-reducing-intraoral-injection-pain
#14
Ozgur Erdogan, Anatachai Sinsawat, Sudeep Pawa, Duangtawan Rintanalert, Suchada Vuddhakanok
Intraoral local anesthesia injection is often perceived as a painful and anxiety-causing dental procedure. Vibration stimulus is one of the nonpharmacologic methods used to reduce unwanted sensations of local anesthesia injection. This clinical study evaluated the effectiveness of a recently introduced vibratory stimulation device in intraoral local anesthesia administration. Thirty-two subjects underwent 2 maxillary local anesthesia injections in 2 different sessions: 1 with conventional techniques and 1 with the aid of a vibratory stimulation device (DentalVibe)...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952638/anesthetic-management-of-the-hypertensive-patient-part-i
#15
Russell Yancey
Hypertension is an important health challenge that affects millions of people across the world and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is critical that anesthesia providers have a working knowledge of the systemic implications of hypertension. This review article will discuss the medical definitions of hypertension, the physiology of maintaining blood pressure, outpatient treatment of hypertension, anesthetic implications, and the common medications used by anesthesia providers in the treatment of hypertension...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952637/a-review-of-current-literature-of-interest-to-the-office-based-anesthesiologist
#16
Daniel L Orr, Mark A Saxen, Bhavani Shankar Kodali
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952636/position-available-editor-anesthesia-progress
#17
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29509527/one-more-checklist
#18
EDITORIAL
Steven Ganzberg
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29509526/recurrent-coronary-artery-spasm-induced-by-vasopressors-during-two-operations-in-the-same-patient-under-general-anesthesia
#19
Naotaka Kishimoto, Munenori Kato, Yasunori Nakanishi, Akari Hasegawa, Yoshihiro Momota
Variant angina is caused by coronary artery spasm (CAS) with ST-segment elevation. We herein report a case of recurrent CAS during 2 operations in the same patient. An 80-year-old woman was scheduled to undergo tracheostomy, submandibular dissection, left partial maxillectomy, and coronoidectomy. We administered ephedrine and phenylephrine to manage hypotension during general anesthesia. Immediately after the administration of these drugs, the ST segment elevated. We decided to cease the operation and transport the patient to the department of cardiology...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29509525/a-case-of-rocuronium-induced-anaphylactic-shock-in-an-asthmatic-child
#20
Ryuichiro Tanoue, Yusuke Takei, Yu Hayashida, Hideki Harada
We experienced a case of anaphylactic shock in a young asthmatic child immediately after administering rocuronium during the induction of anesthesia. Because urticaria did not develop immediately after ventilation difficulty, we diagnosed and responded to asthma, rather than to anaphylactic shock. Correct and rapid response to anaphylactic is extremely important.
2018: Anesthesia Progress
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