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Nursing Clinics of North America

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863584/implications-of-disaster-preparedness-for-nursing
#1
EDITORIAL
Deborah J Persell
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863583/disaster-planning-preparedness-mitigation-response-and-recovery-a-call-for-all-nurses-to-action
#2
EDITORIAL
Stephen D Krau
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863582/vehicle-of-hope-faith-based-disaster-response
#3
REVIEW
Deborah J Persell
In August 2005, the United States experienced one of the most catastrophic and costly disasters in its history: Hurricane Katrina. Faith-based Organizations (FBOs) made a major contribution to the response and recovery efforts. Whereas the activities and skill sets of FBOs vary, their core missions are very similar: they want to provide hope. As a concept, hope has been purported to be essential for health and well-being, is viewed as multidimensional and a life force, as well as is highly individualized. This mixed methods study used interviews of the phenomenology tradition and the Herth Hope Index...
December 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863581/radiation-fear-and-common-sense-adaptations-in-patient-care
#4
REVIEW
Robert C Beauchamp
Lack of understanding about the basic nature of radiation exposure and contamination may lead to unreasonable fear in nursing staff. A brief review of a well-known case shows that in general, both the public and health care providers are radiophobic. Studies have shown that the level of fear correlates inversely with an understanding of radiation. This article explores underlying principles of ionizing radiation and their application in patient management. Reality based, scientifically accurate information along with practical suggestions can free health care providers from unreasonable fear of victims of a radiation accident...
December 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863580/hospital-decontamination-what-nurses-need-to-know
#5
REVIEW
Brent Cox
Incidents involving the release of hazardous materials challenge medical providers with safely, quickly, and correctly removing contaminants from the victim. While doing so, the safety of the first receiver, current patients, bystanders, as well as the victim all have to be considered. Key challenges with hospital decontamination include, but are not limited to, selection of team members, training protocols, employee turnover, and funding. Best practices, based on the available literature and evidence, include administration buy-in and support; strong policy and procedure documentation; equipment maintenance programs; and team member recruitment, retention, and education...
December 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863579/evolution-of-a-nursing-model-for-identifying-client-needs-in-a-disaster-shelter-a-case-study-with-the-american-red-cross
#6
REVIEW
Janice Springer, Mary Casey-Lockyer
From the time of Clara Barton, Red Cross nursing has had a key role in the care and support of persons affected by disasters in the United States. Hurricane Katrina and other events brought to light the need for a shelter model that was inclusive of the whole community, including persons with disabilities, at-risk and vulnerable populations, and children. From an intake process to a nursing model for assessment, an evidence-guided process informed a systematic approach for a registered nurse-led model of care...
December 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863578/wildfire-disasters-and-nursing
#7
REVIEW
Patricia Frohock Hanes
Multiple factors contribute to wildfires in California and other regions: drought, winds, climate change, and spreading urbanization. Little has been done to study the multiple roles of nurses related to wildfire disasters. Major nursing organizations support disaster education for nurses. It is essential for nurses to recognize their roles in each phase of the disaster cycle: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Skills learned in the US federal all-hazards approach to disasters can then be adapted to more specific disasters, such as wildfires, and issues affecting health care...
December 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863577/us-military-nurses-serving-within-the-chaos-of-disaster
#8
REVIEW
Felecia M Rivers
The purpose of this article is to share US military nurses' experiences of responding to disasters. Using phenomenology, 23 participants serving as US military nurses from different service branches and the US Public Health Service volunteered for a single face-to-face interview. Five polar themes plus one final theme emerged from the narratives. Nurses expressed a sense of loss, reshaping of thoughts regarding disasters, and new appreciation of how people's lives are totally disrupted. Findings showed a need for change in nursing education, practice, training, policy, and recommendations for higher education and how the military may better educate its personnel...
December 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863576/federal-emergency-management-agency-response-in-rural-appalachia-a-tale-of-miscommunication-unrealistic-expectations-and-hurt-hurt-hurt
#9
REVIEW
Lauren M Oppizzi, Susan Speraw
In spring of 2012, rural southeastern Kentucky was impacted by torrential storms and flooding that activated federal disaster response through Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). This qualitative research study examines the experience of community members affected by the Kentucky floods of 2012 (N=9) and describes their interactions with FEMA representatives, in their own voice, thereby giving insight into gaps in rural disaster response. The principal investigator spent 6 weeks living in the community and conducted open-ended interviews...
December 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863575/complicated-realities-mental-health-and-moral-incongruence-in-disaster-humanitarian-response
#10
REVIEW
Suzanne M Boswell
In the course of disaster/humanitarian response, providers are exposed to chaotic environments riddled with morally complex situations. This article disseminates research findings that highlight the impact of moral incongruence on responder mental health within the disaster/humanitarian setting by focusing on the theme "Everything was gray." The information is extracted from a larger, mixed methods study examining numerous variables considered within relevant literature to be influential in the occurrence of psychological distress among disaster/humanitarian responders...
December 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863574/all-the-resources-was-gone-the-environmental-context-of-disaster-nursing
#11
REVIEW
Stasia E Ruskie
US nurses are not prepared for the altered conditions of the disaster environment, nor has the context of providing disaster nursing care been a focus of disaster research. Using an existential phenomenologic approach, US nurses described the "not normal" conditions of the disaster environment they experienced as physically and emotionally challenging, because of the reduced infrastructural capabilities, unfamiliar patient populations, and reliance on low-technology nursing with insufficient staff and supplies...
December 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863573/national-disaster-health-consortium-competency-based-training-and-a-report-on-the-american-nurses-credentialing-center-disaster-certification-development
#12
REVIEW
Sherrill J Smith, Sharon L Farra
As the largest profession of health care providers, nurses are an integral component of disaster response. Having clearly delineated competencies and developing training to acquire those competencies are needed to ensure nurses are ready when disasters occur. This article provides a review of nursing and interprofessional disaster competencies and development of a new interprofessional disaster certification. An overview of a standardized disaster training program, the National Disaster Health Consortium, is provided as an exemplar of a competency-based interprofessional disaster education program...
December 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863572/emergency-preparedness-and-the-development-of-health-care-coalitions-a-dynamic-process
#13
REVIEW
Deborah H Kim
Health care emergency preparedness has undergone significant changes since the first widespread distribution of federal funds occurred in 2002. Prior to the development of the Health Resources and Service Administration Bioterrorism Preparedness grant, support to hospitals and public health was limited to smaller regional preparedness programs such as the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program. Measurable progress with both the hospital preparedness program and public health emergency preparedness requires development of partnerships, establishment of coalitions, development of measurable objectives, and a community willingness to work together to solve complex preparedness problems...
December 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27497025/palliative-and-end-of-life-care-compassion-care-commitment-communication-communion
#14
EDITORIAL
Dorothy Wholihan, James C Pace
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27497024/the-difference-between-palliative-care-and-end-of-life-care-more-than-semantics
#15
EDITORIAL
Stephen D Krau
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27497023/palliative-wound-care-for-malignant-fungating-wounds-holistic-considerations-at-end-of-life
#16
REVIEW
Charles Tilley, Jana Lipson, Mark Ramos
Timely, holistic interventions aimed at easing the despair of patients with advanced cancer and malignant fungating wounds (MFWs) must incorporate patient and family goals of care in all aspects of decision-making. People with MFWs suffer from a devastating and often crippling symptom burden including disfigurement, pain, pruritus, malodor, exudates, and bleeding. These symptoms may lead to psychosocial and/or spiritual distress, isolation, and diminished quality of life. The complexity of caring for hospice patients with MFWs requires a pragmatic and holistic interdisciplinary approach guided by specialist-level palliative wound care...
September 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27497022/providing-palliative-care-to-lgbtq-patients
#17
REVIEW
Nina Barrett, Dorothy Wholihan
Nurses should be familiar with and equipped to address the challenges that arise when caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer-identified (LGBTQ) patients. LGBTQ individuals have increased rates of certain physical diseases and are at greater risk of suffering from stress-sensitive mental health issues. Negative social attitudes, widespread discrimination and stigma, physical and psychological victimization, and less social support with aging contribute to the complexity of care for these individuals...
September 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27497021/seeing-the-light-end-of-life-experiences-visions-energy-surges-and-other-death-bed-phenomena
#18
REVIEW
Dorothy Wholihan
Spiritual care is an integral part of multidimensional palliative care and a major domain of care identified in definitions and guidelines. Death bed phenomena include visions, dreams, hallucinations, and premortem energy surges, which can be deeply spiritual experiences. Death bed occurrences are often a source of consolation. However, they have been underrecognized. The last hours of life are sacred; as holistic, multidimensional practitioners, nurses should remain open to experiences not easily explained within a traditional medical model...
September 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27497020/rituals-at-end-of-life
#19
REVIEW
James C Pace, Tyree S Mobley
Understanding the significance of rituals at the end-of-life enables health care professionals to offer meaningful and compassionate interventions that enhance quality of life and support those dying and those who grieve. Rituals contribute to the strength, capacity, and health of providers who cope with death events. Rituals help the living create continuing bonds with those dying, help with coping skills, and allow healthy growth through opportunities for naming, honoring, and memorializing. The display of respect and a nonjudgmental attitude create a space for support, trust, sharing of emotion, empowerment, and quality of care during end-of-life events...
September 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27497019/family-care-during-end-of-life-vigils
#20
REVIEW
Colleen Fleming-Damon
An end-of-life vigil is the act of being with another toward death. A family vigil at end-of-life occurs when significant others gather by the bedside of dying individuals in the weeks, days, or hours prior to the death event. It is not unusual for nurses to be present, bear witness, and share in this human experience. This article reviews seminal and current research regarding the meaning and structure of the lived experience of vigil keeping for a dying family member, and translates research to inform nurses regarding family care during the transition at end-of-life...
September 2016: Nursing Clinics of North America
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