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Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28805402/middle-ground-approach-to-paradox-within-and-between-culture-examination-of-the-creative-benefits-of-paradoxical-frames
#1
Angela K-Y Leung, Shyhnan Liou, Ella Miron-Spektor, Brandon Koh, David Chan, Roni Eisenberg, Iris Schneider
Thriving in increasingly complex and ambiguous environments requires creativity and the capability to reconcile conflicting demands. Recent evidence with Western samples has suggested that paradoxical frames, or mental templates that encourage individuals to recognize and embrace contradictions, could produce creative benefits. We extended the timely, but understudied, topic by studying the nuances of for whom and why creative advantages of paradoxical frames emerge. We suggest that people endorsing a middle ground approach are less likely to scrutinize conflict and reconcile with integrative solutions, thus receiving less creative benefits of paradoxical frames...
August 14, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28795822/self-esteem-and-relationship-satisfaction-during-the-transition-to-motherhood
#2
Manon A van Scheppingen, Jaap J A Denissen, Joanne M Chung, Kristian Tambs, Wiebke Bleidorn
In the current study, we used 5 waves of longitudinal data from a large representative sample of Norwegian mothers (N = 84,711) to examine the association between romantic relationship satisfaction and self-esteem before and after childbirth in subgroups of first-, second-, third-, and fourth-time mothers. Maternal self-esteem showed a highly similar change pattern across subgroups. Specifically, self-esteem decreased during pregnancy, increased until the child was 6 months old, and then gradually decreased over the following years...
August 10, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28771022/longitudinal-changes-in-attachment-orientation-over-a-59-year-period
#3
William J Chopik, Robin S Edelstein, Kevin J Grimm
Research on individual differences in attachment-and their links to emotion, cognition, and behavior in close relationships-has proliferated over the last several decades. However, the majority of this research has focused on children and young adults. Little is known about mean-level changes in attachment orientation beyond early life, in part due to a dearth of longitudinal data on attachment across the life span. The current study used a Q-Sort-based measure of attachment to examine mean-level changes in attachment orientation from age 13 to 72 using data from the Block and Block Longitudinal Study, the Intergenerational Studies, and the Radcliffe College Class of 1964 Sample (total N = 628)...
August 3, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28771021/income-redistribution-predicts-greater-life-satisfaction-across-individual-national-and-cultural-characteristics
#4
Felix Cheung
The widening income gap between the rich and the poor has important social implications. Governmental-level income redistribution through tax and welfare policies presents an opportunity to reduce income inequality and its negative consequences. The current longitudinal studies examined whether within-region changes in income redistribution over time relate to life satisfaction. Moreover, I examined potential moderators of this relationship to test the strong versus weak hypotheses of income redistribution...
August 3, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28737418/charisma-in-everyday-life-conceptualization-and-validation-of-the-general-charisma-inventory
#5
Konstantin O Tskhay, Rebecca Zhu, Christopher Zou, Nicholas O Rule
Although both scholars and lay people are fascinated with charismatic individuals, relatively few theorists have attempted to define charisma. Much of the empirical research examining charisma has focused on leadership. Even within that literature, however, theorists have focused on charisma's outcomes, leaving unarticulated what charisma actually is. Here, we tested an operational conceptualization of charisma in the context of everyday life. Specifically, we proposed that charisma is composed of the interpersonally focused dimensions of influence (the ability to guide others) and affability (the ability to make other people feel comfortable and at ease)...
July 24, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28737417/benefits-of-positive-relationship-experiences-for-avoidantly-attached-individuals
#6
Sarah C E Stanton, Lorne Campbell, Jennifer C Pink
Attachment avoidance is characterized by discomfort with closeness and a reluctance to develop intimacy with romantic partners, which contribute to heightened general negativity and lower satisfaction and self-disclosure in and out of their relationships. Recent research, however, has begun to uncover circumstances in which romantic partners and positive relationships buffer more avoidantly attached individuals against deleterious individual and relationship outcomes. Across 3 studies, using a multimethod approach encompassing both experimental and dyadic longitudinal diary methods, we investigated the effects of positive, intimacy-related relationship experiences on more avoidant persons' positive and negative affect, relationship quality, self-disclosure, and attachment security immediately and over time...
July 24, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28737416/rejecting-a-bad-option-feels-like-choosing-a-good-one
#7
Hannah Perfecto, Jeff Galak, Joseph P Simmons, Leif D Nelson
Across 4,151 participants, the authors demonstrate a novel framing effect, attribute matching, whereby matching a salient attribute of a decision frame with that of a decision's options facilitates decision-making. This attribute matching is shown to increase decision confidence and, ultimately, consensus estimates by increasing feelings of metacognitive ease. In Study 1, participants choosing the more attractive of two faces or rejecting the less attractive face reported greater confidence in and perceived consensus around their decision...
July 24, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28726437/anti-profit-beliefs-how-people-neglect-the-societal-benefits-of-profit
#8
Amit Bhattacharjee, Jason Dana, Jonathan Baron
Profit-seeking firms are stereotypically depicted as immoral and harmful to society. At the same time, profit-driven enterprise has contributed immensely to human prosperity. Though scholars agree that profit can incentivize societally beneficial behaviors, people may neglect this possibility. In 7 studies, we show that people see business profit as necessarily in conflict with social good, a view we call anti-profit beliefs. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that U.S. participants hold anti-profit views of real U...
July 20, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28703602/the-psychological-health-benefits-of-accepting-negative-emotions-and-thoughts-laboratory-diary-and-longitudinal-evidence
#9
Brett Q Ford, Phoebe Lam, Oliver P John, Iris B Mauss
Individuals differ in the degree to which they tend to habitually accept their emotions and thoughts without judging them-a process here referred to as habitual acceptance. Acceptance has been linked with greater psychological health, which we propose may be due to the role acceptance plays in negative emotional responses to stressors: acceptance helps keep individuals from reacting to-and thus exacerbating-their negative mental experiences. Over time, experiencing lower negative emotion should promote psychological health...
July 13, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28650191/perceived-problem-solving-deficits-and-suicidal-ideation-evidence-for-the-explanatory-roles-of-thwarted-belongingness-and-perceived-burdensomeness-in-five-samples
#10
Carol Chu, Kristin L Walker, Ian H Stanley, Jameson K Hirsch, Jeffrey H Greenberg, M David Rudd, Thomas E Joiner
Perceived social problem-solving deficits are associated with suicide risk; however, little research has examined the mechanisms underlying this relationship. The interpersonal theory of suicide proposes 2 mechanisms in the pathogenesis of suicidal desire: intractable feelings of thwarted belongingness (TB) and perceived burdensomeness (PB). This study tested whether TB and PB serve as explanatory links in the relationship between perceived social problem-solving (SPS) deficits and suicidal thoughts and behaviors cross-sectionally and longitudinally...
June 26, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28639795/-you-re-one-of-us-black-americans-use-of-hypodescent-and-its-association-with-egalitarianism
#11
Arnold K Ho, Nour S Kteily, Jacqueline M Chen
Research on multiracial categorization has focused on majority group social perceivers (i.e., White Americans), demonstrating that they (a) typically categorize Black-White multiracials according to a rule of hypodescent, associating them more with their lower status parent group than their higher status parent group, and (b) do so at least in part to preserve the hierarchical status quo. The current work examines whether members of an ethnic minority group, Black Americans, also associate Black-White multiracials more with their minority versus majority parent group and if so, why...
June 22, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28627917/functional-intimacy-needing-but-not-wanting-the-touch-of-a-stranger
#12
Juliana Schroeder, Ayelet Fishbach, Chelsea Schein, Kurt Gray
Intimacy is often motivated by love, but sometimes it is merely functional. For example, disrobing and being touched at an airport security check serves the goal of catching a flight, not building a relationship. We propose that this functional intimacy induces discomfort, making people prefer greater social distance from their interaction partner. Supporting this prediction, participants who considered (Experiments 1 and 2) or experienced (Experiment 3) more physically intimate medical procedures preferred a health provider who is less social...
June 19, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28627916/individual-differences-in-reliance-on-intuition-predict-harsher-moral-judgments
#13
Sarah J Ward, Laura A King
The notion that intuition guides moral judgment is widely accepted. Yet, there is a dearth of research examining whether individual differences in reliance on intuition influence moral judgment. Five studies provided evidence that faith in intuition (FI) predicts higher condemnation of moral transgressions. Studies 1 and 2 (combined N = 543) demonstrated that FI predicted higher moral condemnation of strange actions characterized by ambiguous harm. This association maintained controlling for a host of relevant ideological and emotional "third" variables...
June 19, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28604018/resisting-temptation-for-the-good-of-the-group-binding-moral-values-and-the-moralization-of-self-control
#14
Marlon Mooijman, Peter Meindl, Daphna Oyserman, John Monterosso, Morteza Dehghani, John M Doris, Jesse Graham
When do people see self-control as a moral issue? We hypothesize that the group-focused "binding" moral values of Loyalty/betrayal, Authority/subversion, and Purity/degradation play a particularly important role in this moralization process. Nine studies provide support for this prediction. First, moralization of self-control goals (e.g., losing weight, saving money) is more strongly associated with endorsing binding moral values than with endorsing individualizing moral values (Care/harm, Fairness/cheating)...
June 12, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28604017/religion-repulsion-and-reaction-formation-transforming-repellent-attractions-and-repulsions
#15
Dov Cohen, Emily Kim, Nathan W Hudson
Protestants were more likely than non-Protestants to demonstrate phenomena consistent with the use of reaction formation. Lab experiments showed that when manipulations were designed to produce taboo attractions (to unconventional sexual practices), Protestants instead showed greater repulsion. When implicitly conditioned to produce taboo repulsions (to African Americans), Protestants instead showed greater attraction. Supportive evidence from other studies came from clinicians' judgments, defense mechanism inventories, and a survey of respondent attitudes...
June 12, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28594201/hypocritical-flip-flop-or-courageous-evolution-when-leaders-change-their-moral-minds
#16
Tamar A Kreps, Kristin Laurin, Anna C Merritt
How do audiences react to leaders who change their opinion after taking moral stances? We propose that people believe moral stances are stronger commitments, compared with pragmatic stances; we therefore explore whether and when audiences believe those commitments can be broken. We find that audiences believe moral commitments should not be broken, and thus that they deride as hypocritical leaders who claim a moral commitment and later change their views. Moreover, they view them as less effective and less worthy of support...
June 8, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28594200/a-mixed-methods-study-of-personality-conceptions-in-the-levant-jordan-lebanon-syria-and-the-west-bank
#17
Pia Zeinoun, Lina Daouk-Öyry, Lina Choueiri, Fons J R van de Vijver
Personality taxonomies are investigated using either etic-style studies that test whether Western-developed models fit in a new culture, or emic-style studies that derive personality dimensions from a local culture, using a psycholexical approach. Recent studies have incorporated strengths from both approaches. We combine the 2 approaches in the first study of personality descriptors in spoken Arabic. In Study 1, we collected 17,283 responses from a sample of adults in Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and the West Bank (N = 545)...
June 8, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28581302/forgetting-to-remember-our-experiences-people-overestimate-how-much-they-will-retrospect-about-personal-events
#18
Stephanie Tully, Tom Meyvis
People value experiences in part because of the memories they create. Yet, we find that people systematically overestimate how much they will retrospect about their experiences. This overestimation results from people focusing on their desire to retrospect about experiences, while failing to consider the experience's limited enduring accessibility in memory. Consistent with this view, we find that desirability is a stronger predictor of forecasted retrospection than it is of reported retrospection, resulting in greater overestimation when the desirability of retrospection is higher...
June 5, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28581301/solidarity-through-shared-disadvantage-highlighting-shared-experiences-of-discrimination-improves-relations-between-stigmatized-groups
#19
Clarissa I Cortland, Maureen A Craig, Jenessa R Shapiro, Jennifer A Richeson, Rebecca Neel, Noah J Goldstein
Intergroup relations research has largely focused on relations between members of dominant groups and members of disadvantaged groups. The small body of work examining intraminority intergroup relations, or relations between members of different disadvantaged groups, reveals that salient experiences of ingroup discrimination promote positive relations between groups that share a dimension of identity (e.g., 2 different racial minority groups) and negative relations between groups that do not share a dimension of identity (e...
June 5, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28581300/reverse-ego-depletion-acts-of-self-control-can-improve-subsequent-performance-in-indian-cultural-contexts
#20
Krishna Savani, Veronika Job
The strength model of self-control has been predominantly tested with people from Western cultures. The present research asks whether the phenomenon of ego-depletion generalizes to a culture emphasizing the virtues of exerting mental self-control in everyday life. A pilot study found that whereas Americans tended to believe that exerting willpower on mental tasks is depleting, Indians tended to believe that exerting willpower is energizing. Using dual task ego-depletion paradigms, Studies 1a, 1b, and 1c found reverse ego-depletion among Indian participants, such that participants exhibited better mental self-control on a subsequent task after initially working on strenuous rather than nonstrenuous cognitive tasks...
June 5, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
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