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Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28206792/christian-self-enhancement
#1
Jochen E Gebauer, Constantine Sedikides, Alexandra Schrade
People overestimate themselves in domains that are central to their self-concept. Critically, the psychological status of this "self-centrality principle" remains unclear. One view regards the principle as an inextricable part of human nature and, thus, as universal and resistant to normative pressure. A contrasting view regards the principle as liable to pressure (and subsequent modification) from self-effacement norms, thus questioning its universality. Advocates of the latter view point to Christianity's robust self-effacement norms, which they consider particularly effective in curbing self-enhancement, and ascribe Christianity an ego-quieting function...
February 16, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28206791/in-your-eyes-only-discrepancies-and-agreement-between-self-and-other-reports-of-personality-from-age-14-to-29
#2
Julia M Rohrer, Boris Egloff, Michal Kosinski, David Stillwell, Stefan C Schmukle
Do others perceive the personality changes that take place between the ages of 14 and 29 in a similar fashion as the aging person him- or herself? This cross-sectional study analyzed age trajectories in self- versus other-reported Big Five personality traits and in self-other agreement in a sample of more than 10,000 individuals from the myPersonality Project. Results for self-reported personality showed maturation effects (increases in extraversion, conscientiousness, openness to experience, and emotional stability), and this pattern was generally also reflected in other-reports, albeit with discrepancies regarding timing and magnitude...
February 16, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182449/the-family-environment-in-early-childhood-has-a-long-term-effect-on-self-esteem-a-longitudinal-study-from-birth-to-age-27-years
#3
Ulrich Orth
A better understanding is needed of the factors that shape the development of individual differences in self-esteem. Using a prospective longitudinal design, this research tested whether the family environment in early childhood predicts self-esteem in later developmental periods. Data came from a nationally representative U.S. sample of 8,711 participants, who reported on their self-esteem biannually from age 8 to 27 years. Moreover, during the participants' first 6 years of life, biannual assessments of their mothers provided information on the quality of the home environment (covering quality of parenting, cognitive stimulation, and physical home environment), quality of parental relationship, presence of father, maternal depression, and poverty status of the family...
February 9, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28150979/codevelopment-of-preschoolers-temperament-traits-and-social-play-networks-over-an-entire-school-year
#4
Jennifer Watling Neal, C Emily Durbin, Allison E Gornik, Sharon L Lo
Children enter preschool with temperament traits that may shape or be shaped by their social interactions in the peer setting. We collected classroom observational measures of positive emotionality (PE), negative emotionality (NE), effortful control (EC), and peer social play relationships from 2 complete preschool classrooms (N = 53 children) over the course of an entire school year. Using longitudinal social network analysis, we found evidence that children's traits shaped the formation of play relationships, and that the traits of children's playmates shaped the subsequent development of children's own traits...
February 2, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28150978/self-esteem-across-the-second-half-of-life-the-role-of-socioeconomic-status-physical-health-social-relationships-and-personality-factors
#5
Tilmann von Soest, Jenny Wagner, Thomas Hansen, Denis Gerstorf
Self-esteem development across adulthood has been in the center of interest for some time now. However, not much is known about factors that shape self-esteem and its development in the second half of life and whether the factors differ with age and gender. To examine these questions, this study uses 2-wave data from the population-based NorLAG study in Norway (N = 5,555; Mage = 58 years; 51% women) and combines self-report data on self-esteem and personality with registry-based information on socioeconomic status (education, income, unemployment), health problems (sick leave, lifetime history of disability), and social relationships (cohabiting partner, lifetime history of divorce and widowhood)...
February 2, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095008/moving-on-or-digging-deeper-regulatory-mode-and-interpersonal-conflict-resolution
#6
Christine E Webb, Peter T Coleman, Maya Rossignac-Milon, Stephen J Tomasulo, E Tory Higgins
Conflict resolution, in its most basic sense, requires movement and change between opposing motivational states. Although scholars and practitioners have long acknowledged this point, research has yet to investigate whether individual differences in the motivation for movement from state-to-state influence conflict resolution processes. Regulatory Mode Theory (RMT) describes this fundamental motivation as locomotion. RMT simultaneously describes an orthogonal motivational emphasis on assessment, a tendency for critical evaluation and comparison...
January 16, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095007/personality-and-behavior-prediction-and-consistency-across-cultures-a-multimethod-study-of-blacks-and-whites-in-south-africa
#7
Velichko H Fetvadjiev, Deon Meiring, Fons J R van de Vijver, J Alewyn Nel, Lusanda Sekaja, Sumaya Laher
The cross-cultural universality of behavior's consistency and predictability from personality, assumed in trait models though challenged in cultural psychological models, has usually been operationalized in terms of beliefs and perceptions, and assessed using single-instance self-reports. In a multimethod study of actual behavior across a range of situations, we examined predictability and consistency in participants from the more collectivistic Black ethnic group and the more individualistic White group in South Africa...
January 16, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080098/knowledge-of-the-self-control-benefits-of-high-level-versus-low-level-construal
#8
Karen E MacGregor, Jessica J Carnevale, Nicole E Dusthimer, Kentaro Fujita
Research indicates that inducing high-level construal (processing that highlights invariant, essential features) relative to low-level construal (processing that highlights idiosyncratic, peripheral features) promotes self-control (Fujita & Carnevale, 2012). In the present work, we investigate to what extent people recognize the self-control benefits of high-level construal, and explore the consequences of this knowledge. Studies 1 and 2 provide initial evidence that individuals are aware that high-level relative to low-level construal promotes self-control in the dieting domain...
January 12, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28068116/the-crowded-life-is-a-slow-life-population-density-and-life-history-strategy
#9
Oliver Sng, Steven L Neuberg, Michael E W Varnum, Douglas T Kenrick
The world population has doubled over the last half century. Yet, research on the psychological effects of human population density, once a popular topic, has decreased over the past few decades. Applying a fresh perspective to an old topic, we draw upon life history theory to examine the effects of population density. Across nations and across the U.S. states (Studies 1 and 2), we find that dense populations exhibit behaviors corresponding to a slower life history strategy, including greater future-orientation, greater investment in education, more long-term mating orientation, later marriage age, lower fertility, and greater parental investment...
January 9, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28068115/state-trait-decomposition-of-name-letter-test-scores-and-relationships-with-global-self-esteem
#10
Enrico Perinelli, Guido Alessandri, M Brent Donnellan, Mariola Łaguna
The Name Letter Test (NLT) assesses the degree that participants show a preference for an individual's own initials. The NLT was often thought to measure implicit self-esteem, but recent literature reviews do not equivocally support this hypothesis. Several authors have argued that the NLT is most strongly associated with the state component of self-esteem. The current research uses a modified STARTS model to (a) estimate the percentage of stable and transient components of the NLT and (b) estimate the covariances between stable/transient components of the NLT and stable/transient components of self-esteem and positive and negative affect...
January 9, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28068114/he-never-willed-to-have-the-will-he-has-historicist-narratives-civilized-blame-and-the-need-to-distinguish-two-notions-of-free-will
#11
Michael J Gill, Stephanie C Cerce
Harsh blame can be socially destructive. This article examines how harsh blame can be "civilized." A core construct here is the historicist narrative, which is a story-like account of how a person came to be the sort of person she is. We argue that historicist narratives regarding immoral actors can temper blame and that this happens via a novel mechanism. To illuminate that mechanism, we offer a novel theoretical perspective on lay beliefs about free will. We distinguish 2 senses of free will: (a) Freedom of action, which portrays the will as a dynamic choice-making mechanism and concerns whether the actor can exert volitional control via that mechanism at the time of action, and (b) Control of self-formation, which portrays the will as an enduring disposition (e...
January 9, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27977221/the-invisibility-cloak-illusion-people-incorrectly-believe-they-observe-others-more-than-others-observe-them
#12
Erica J Boothby, Margaret S Clark, John A Bargh
Whether at a coffee shop, in a waiting room, or riding the bus, people frequently observe the other people around them. Yet they often fail to realize how much other people engage in the same behavior, and that they, therefore, also are being observed. Because it is logically impossible that people, on average, are the subjects of observation more than they are objects of it, the belief that one watches others more than one is watched is an illusion. Several studies show that people incorrectly believe that they observe others more than other people observe them...
December 15, 2016: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27977220/how-distinctive-are-morningness-and-eveningness-from-the-big-five-factors-of-personality-a-meta-analytic-investigation
#13
Anastasiya A Lipnevich, Marcus Credè, Elisabeth Hahn, Frank M Spinath, Richard D Roberts, Franzis Preckel
This study explores relations between measures of individuals' circadian preferences and the Big Five. To this end, we compared a model of circadian preferences that acknowledges morningness (M) and eveningness (E) as separate dimensions to that of a model that places M and E on a single continuum (M-E). Analyses of 620 correlations from 44 independent samples (N = 16,647) revealed weak to modest relations between both dimensions of circadian preferences and the Big Five personality traits. The strongest observed relation was found between Conscientiousness and M (ρ = ...
December 15, 2016: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27936835/the-effect-of-mood-on-judgments-of-subjective-well-being-nine-tests-of-the-judgment-model
#14
Stevie C Y Yap, Jessica Wortman, Ivana Anusic, S Glenn Baker, Laura D Scherer, M Brent Donnellan, Richard E Lucas
Life satisfaction judgments are thought to represent an overall evaluation of the quality of a person's life as a whole. Thus, they should reflect relatively important and stable characteristics of that person's life. Previous highly cited research has suggested that transient factors, such as the mood that a person experiences at the time that well-being judgments are made, can influence these judgments. However, most existing studies used small sample sizes, and few replications have been attempted. Nine direct and conceptual replications of past studies testing the effects of mood on life satisfaction judgments were conducted using sample sizes that were considerably larger than previous studies (Ns = 202, 200, 269, 118, 320, 401, 285, 129, 122)...
December 12, 2016: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27936834/artful-paltering-the-risks-and-rewards-of-using-truthful-statements-to-mislead-others
#15
Todd Rogers, Richard Zeckhauser, Francesca Gino, Michael I Norton, Maurice E Schweitzer
Paltering is the active use of truthful statements to convey a misleading impression. Across 2 pilot studies and 6 experiments, we identify paltering as a distinct form of deception. Paltering differs from lying by omission (the passive omission of relevant information) and lying by commission (the active use of false statements). Our findings reveal that paltering is common in negotiations and that many negotiators prefer to palter than to lie by commission. Paltering, however, may promote conflict fueled by self-serving interpretations; palterers focus on the veracity of their statements ("I told the truth"), whereas targets focus on the misleading impression palters convey ("I was misled")...
December 12, 2016: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27936833/understanding-the-cognitive-and-motivational-underpinnings-of-sexual-passion-from-a-dualistic-model
#16
Frederick L Philippe, Robert J Vallerand, Léa Bernard-Desrosiers, Valérie Guilbault, Guillaume Rajotte
Sexual passion has always been conceptualized as a one-dimensional phenomenon that emerges from interactions with partners. Drawing from the literature on passionate activities, sexual passion was defined in terms of its intrapersonal motivational and cognitive components and examined from a dualistic perspective. More specifically, in 5 studies, we investigated how 2 types of sexual passion, harmonious and obsessive, can lead to clearly distinct subjective, relational, and cognitive outcomes. Study 1 validated a scale measuring harmonious and obsessive sexual passion, and showed that each type of sexual passion leads to common, but also distinct, subjective consequences during sexual activity engagement for both singles and romantically engaged individuals...
December 12, 2016: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27929302/age-time-period-and-birth-cohort-differences-in-self-esteem-reexamining-a-cohort-sequential-longitudinal-study
#17
Jean M Twenge, Nathan T Carter, W Keith Campbell
Orth, Trzesniewski, and Robins (2010) concluded that the nationally representative Americans' Changing Lives (ACL) cohort-sequential study demonstrated moderate to large age differences in self-esteem, and no birth cohort (generational) differences in the age trajectory. In a reanalysis of these data using 2 different statistical techniques, we find significant increases in self-esteem that could be attributed to birth cohort or time period. First, hierarchical linear modeling analyses with birth cohort as a continuous variable (vs...
December 8, 2016: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27929301/the-dark-side-of-the-sublime-distinguishing-a-threat-based-variant-of-awe
#18
Amie M Gordon, Jennifer E Stellar, Craig L Anderson, Galen D McNeil, Daniel Loew, Dacher Keltner
Theoretical conceptualizations of awe suggest this emotion can be more positive or negative depending on specific appraisal processes. However, the emergent scientific study of awe rarely emphasizes its negative side, classifying it instead as a positive emotion. In the present research we tested whether there is a more negative variant of awe that arises in response to vast, complex stimuli that are threatening (e.g., tornadoes, terrorist attack, wrathful god). We discovered people do experience this type of awe with regularity (Studies 1 & 4) and that it differs from other variants of awe in terms of its underlying appraisals, subjective experience, physiological correlates, and consequences for well-being...
December 8, 2016: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27935728/on-sanction-goal-justifications-how-and-why-deterrence-justifications-undermine-rule-compliance
#19
Marlon Mooijman, Wilco W van Dijk, Eric van Dijk, Naomi Ellemers
Authorities frequently justify their sanctions as attempts to deter people from rule breaking. Although providing a sanction justification seems appealing and harmless, we propose that a deterrence justification decreases the extent to which sanctions are effective in promoting rule compliance. We develop a theoretical model that specifies how and why this occurs. Consistent with our model, 5 experiments demonstrated that-compared with sanctions provided without a justification or sanctions provided with a just-deserts justification-sanction effectiveness decreased when sanctions were justified as attempts to deter people from rule breaking...
December 1, 2016: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221092/social-and-economic-ideologies-differentially-predict-prejudice-across-the-political-spectrum-but-social-issues-are-most-divisive
#20
Jarret T Crawford, Mark J Brandt, Yoel Inbar, John R Chambers, Matt Motyl
Liberals and conservatives both express prejudice toward ideologically dissimilar others (Brandt et al., 2014). Previous work on ideological prejudice did not take advantage of evidence showing that ideology is multidimensional, with social and economic ideologies representing related but separable belief systems. In 5 studies (total N = 4912), we test 3 competing hypotheses of a multidimensional account of ideological prejudice. The dimension-specific symmetry hypothesis predicts that social and economic ideologies differentially predict prejudice against targets who are perceived to vary on the social and economic political dimensions, respectively...
March 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
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